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daycare
06-28-2011, 05:58 PM
yes another question about my niece....lol..you guys can join my drama I am going through right now.

do you remember the movie rain man...the guy would always recite lines from movies and say them over and over. or would say the same things over and over.

My niece does this,...example I was trying to get her to go to the bathroom and she will say train, chuga chuga choo choo like 15 times.....then she will say more did my shoes go, my shoes go, my shoes go...then reapeat again several times... She does make some connection with what you say, but then will out of know where make very unsual comments...

like I willl say eat your food, she will say....hello my kitty hello my kitty hello my kitty over and over....she will call me by name and then say it again...


what do you guys think about this and how do I work with it? Or can i???

Kaddidle Care
06-28-2011, 06:27 PM
Ride the wave babe!

My son used to recite the blendi pens commercial verbatum! Also did the Malfoy dialog from the Harry Potter game: Well, well, well.. if it isn't the famous Harry Potter... etc.

I thought he was Rain man too! He still chatters incessantly but his teacher doesn't complain so I guess he does it best for me. :cool:

It may just be a comfort/coping thing. The new routine is just that - new. Hang in there and like I said, ride the wave.

Blackcat31
06-28-2011, 06:45 PM
LOL!! My ds did repeat repeat too when he was 3!! :lol: His was "Fall into the gap, fall into the gap" over and over and over and over. It was a GAP commercial that he just caught one day and apparently it made a huge impact on him. It was funny though! :lol:

daycare
06-28-2011, 07:58 PM
I guess my concern is not that she's repeating it all the time it's that's her response to questions have no relation to what was asked.

Like. Eat your food her latest response was in the window I see the window the window I see the window. Then say something like my shoe where my shoes my shoe.
Lol maybe it's a nervous thing ??

SilverSabre25
06-28-2011, 08:15 PM
I would say it sounds like echolalia, but she's not repeating what's being said around her, she's repeating other stuff. Perhaps it's something similar to or related to echolalia?

I still think that it sounds like this poor child desperately needs a professional evaluation and some intensive therapies if she's going to manage to grow up even relatively normal. I'm sorry your family is going through an emergency, but I can't help feeling like perhaps it's for the best for your niece?

jojosmommy
06-29-2011, 11:57 AM
All of your posts are pointing to typical autism behaviors. I pasted some info- obviously some children will exhibit some/other traits, just some info.



Most parents of autistic children suspect that something is wrong by the time the child is 18 months old and seek help by the time the child is age 2. Children with autism typically have difficulties in:

•Pretend play

•Social interactions

•Verbal and nonverbal communication

Some children with autism appear normal before age 1 or 2 and then suddenly "regress" and lose language or social skills they had previously gained. This is called the regressive type of autism.

People with autism may:

•Be overly sensitive in sight, hearing, touch, smell, or taste (for example, they may refuse to wear "itchy" clothes and become distressed if they are forced to wear the clothes)

•Have unusual distress when routines are changed

•Perform repeated body movements

•Show unusual attachments to objects

The symptoms may vary from moderate to severe.

Communication problems may include:

•Cannot start or maintain a social conversation

•Communicates with gestures instead of words

•Develops language slowly or not at all

•Does not adjust gaze to look at objects that others are looking at

•Does not refer to self correctly (for example, says "you want water" when the child means "I want water")

•Does not point to direct others' attention to objects (occurs in the first 14 months of life)

•Repeats words or memorized passages, such as commercials

•Uses nonsense rhyming

Social interaction:

•Does not make friends

•Does not play interactive games

•Is withdrawn

•May not respond to eye contact or smiles, or may avoid eye contact

•May treat others as if they are objects

•Prefers to spend time alone, rather than with others

•Shows a lack of empathy

Response to sensory information:

•Does not startle at loud noises

•Has heightened or low senses of sight, hearing, touch, smell, or taste

•May find normal noises painful and hold hands over ears

•May withdraw from physical contact because it is overstimulating or overwhelming

•Rubs surfaces, mouths or licks objects

•Seems to have a heightened or low response to pain

Play:

•Doesn't imitate the actions of others

•Prefers solitary or ritualistic play

•Shows little pretend or imaginative play

Behaviors:

•"Acts up" with intense tantrums

•Gets stuck on a single topic or task (perseveration)

•Has a short attention span

•Has very narrow interests

•Is overactive or very passive

•Shows aggression to others or self

•Shows a strong need for sameness

•Uses repetitive body movements

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002494/

jojosmommy
06-29-2011, 12:09 PM
Check out firstsigns.org

Also, Autism Society:
http://www.autism-society.org/

has symptoms,diagnosis info, and even a blog under Living with Autism which you may find some stories to connect to.

Blackcat31
06-29-2011, 12:14 PM
Here is another fantastic site for autism. Chalk full of resources, curriculum ideas, and helpful links.

http://tinsnips.org/

daycare
06-29-2011, 12:15 PM
All of your posts are pointing to typical autism behaviors. I pasted some info- obviously some children will exhibit some/other traits, just some info.



Most parents of autistic children suspect that something is wrong by the time the child is 18 months old and seek help by the time the child is age 2. Children with autism typically have difficulties in:

•Pretend play

•Social interactions

•Verbal and nonverbal communication

Some children with autism appear normal before age 1 or 2 and then suddenly "regress" and lose language or social skills they had previously gained. This is called the regressive type of autism.

People with autism may:

•Be overly sensitive in sight, hearing, touch, smell, or taste (for example, they may refuse to wear "itchy" clothes and become distressed if they are forced to wear the clothes)

•Have unusual distress when routines are changed

•Perform repeated body movements

•Show unusual attachments to objects

The symptoms may vary from moderate to severe.

Communication problems may include:

•Cannot start or maintain a social conversation

•Communicates with gestures instead of words

•Develops language slowly or not at all

•Does not adjust gaze to look at objects that others are looking at

•Does not refer to self correctly (for example, says "you want water" when the child means "I want water")

•Does not point to direct others' attention to objects (occurs in the first 14 months of life)

•Repeats words or memorized passages, such as commercials

•Uses nonsense rhyming

Social interaction:

•Does not make friends

•Does not play interactive games

•Is withdrawn

•May not respond to eye contact or smiles, or may avoid eye contact

•May treat others as if they are objects

•Prefers to spend time alone, rather than with others

•Shows a lack of empathy

Response to sensory information:

•Does not startle at loud noises

•Has heightened or low senses of sight, hearing, touch, smell, or taste

•May find normal noises painful and hold hands over ears

•May withdraw from physical contact because it is overstimulating or overwhelming

•Rubs surfaces, mouths or licks objects

•Seems to have a heightened or low response to pain

Play:

•Doesn't imitate the actions of others

•Prefers solitary or ritualistic play

•Shows little pretend or imaginative play

Behaviors:

•"Acts up" with intense tantrums

•Gets stuck on a single topic or task (perseveration)

•Has a short attention span

•Has very narrow interests

•Is overactive or very passive

•Shows aggression to others or self

•Shows a strong need for sameness

•Uses repetitive body movements

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002494/
thanks so much for posting this... I read up on the echolalia and OMG fits her to a T.
some of the stuff that is listed here about autusim stands true, but I have not been in her company long enough to see more.
She was supposed to be here today, but my MIL was too tired to get up to get her here....I am really upset about the fact that she is not here, because I told them that I will not work with them if they are not going to be consistent. I told them that this is super hard on me and my other DCK. Every time someone creates change in her life, I am starting all over again from day one.

I am hoping that my MIL find care for her soon with someone that is educated enough to help her. I can't help her, I don't know how. The only thing that I can do is ride the wave and just try my best.

again thanks for all of the responses...

daycare
06-29-2011, 12:21 PM
•Rubs surfaces, mouths or licks objects

so after reading this, it made me remember a conversation that I had with my SIL a few months ago.... she told me that her daughter licks her ear (moms ear) all the time, rubs on things all the time and will put all of her toys in her mouth acting as if she were smoking..... EXample, she took a drum sitck and held it like a cigarette and will lick and put it in her mouth. Her mom said she does this with lots of things...

Her mom told me about it, becuase she was concerned that her daughter may have been exposed to sexual abuse.

Michael
06-29-2011, 01:42 PM
Found some of these Repeating Child threads: http://www.daycare.com/forum/tags.php?tag=repeating+child

and Autism: http://www.daycare.com/forum/tags.php?tag=autism

jojosmommy
06-30-2011, 11:40 AM
Do you think MIL thought it would be nice to give you a break for a day?

I have dealt with difficult cases and often find that the caregiver wants to go easy on you and give you a break here and there b/c they know it is hard caring for their child.

daycare
06-30-2011, 11:59 AM
Do you think MIL thought it would be nice to give you a break for a day?

I have dealt with difficult cases and often find that the caregiver wants to go easy on you and give you a break here and there b/c they know it is hard caring for their child.
sorry what is this in regards too? lol Im lost