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  #1  
Old 07-24-2009, 03:26 PM
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Question Daycare Supply List

Hello,

I am enrolling my 2 year old in a new daycare next month. I met with the Director and toured the facilities over the summer and was very impressed. I have also heard great things, plenty of references. Last month, I put down a non-refundable "registration fee" of $90 and book fees of $30. I also had to buy uniforms, which I spent almost $100 for! I was assuming that would cover all supplies and things that my daughter would need.

Today I received a letter in the mail with an extensive Supply List. It includes Clorox wipes (cleaning supplies?!.. those should already be available!!) and crayons, markers.. all the basic school supplies plus specific items from Hobby Lobby like finger paints and such.

Ok... she's 2.... and I'll be paying outgrageous tuition plus a registration fee (for what?), so... what's with the supply list?

Her other daycare just required pull-ups, wipes, a blanket, and change of clothes.. plus, no uniforms!!

And, no.. when I met with the director, I was not told about the uniforms or supply list. I read the handbook and bought the uniforms.

Anyway, is this normal? Does anyone else have a supply list for their 2 year old daycare?

Last edited by Michael; 09-09-2010 at 11:25 PM. Reason: spelling
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  #2  
Old 07-24-2009, 06:03 PM
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Wow! Personally, I think that is crazy. Uniforms and books for 2 yr olds?
Where was your daughter before, in a daycare facility or an at home provider?
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Old 07-24-2009, 07:45 PM
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They make uniforms for two year olds? What, little blue polo onesies and snap leg khakis?

I think you might be getting milked.

Supplies should be part of the package deal, you know, what you pay tuition for.
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Old 07-24-2009, 10:23 PM
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Sounds like you've enrolled your child in Himmler and Goebels and Goering child care center.

Uniforms? For what? They're TWO, it's not like they're having fashion wars.....at that age, we had all we could do to get our son to wear clothes! Thankfully he outgrew his hippy phase, and now is in his "cutoff shorts and that's it phase" for the summer.
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Old 07-25-2009, 06:07 AM
GretasLittleFriends GretasLittleFriends is offline
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I understand the $90 in non-refundable. What about the $30 book fee? Can you return the uniforms? If it were me, I'd be looking for someplace else.

Uniforms, that just boggles my mind. I can understand a mild dress code as I kind of have one. Nothing really, just that the children need to wear play clothes, not dressy clothes. I could understand even with a child in diapers requiring snap pants or something like that for ease of changing, but that seems a little much.

As far as a supply list, I could understand diapers, wipes, things like that. Even a box of Kleenexes or a snack once in a while, but these should really be supplied by the daycare.
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Old 07-25-2009, 06:10 AM
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Oh, and I forgot to ask... How much extra are they charging you for meals and snacks?
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  #7  
Old 08-02-2009, 02:00 PM
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Default daycare list

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Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Hello,

I am enrolling my 2 year old in a new daycare next month. I met with the Director and toured the facilities over the summer and was very impressed. I have also heard great things, plenty of references. Last month, I put down a non-refundable "registration fee" of $90 and book fees of $30. I also had to buy uniforms, which I spent almost $100 for! I was assuming that would cover all supplies and things that my daughter would need.

Today I recieved a letter in the mail with an extensive Supply List. It includes Clorox wipes (cleaning supplies?!.. those should already be available!!) and crayons, markers.. all the basic school supplies plus specific items from Hobby Lobby like finger paints and such.

Ok... she's 2.... and I'll be paying outgrageous tuition plus a registration fee (for what?), so... what's with the supply list?

Her other daycare just required pull-ups, wipes, a blanket, and change of clothes.. plus, no uniforms!!

And, no.. when I met with the director, I was not told about the uniforms or supply list. I read the handbook and bought the uniforms.

Anyway, is this normal? Does anyone else have a supply list for their 2 year old daycare?
Yes
It is great to have a list for all ages this help keep the cost of childcare down.
And it helps teachers all supplies on hand at all times.
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  #8  
Old 08-28-2009, 06:59 PM
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Default Uniforms for 2 year olds

Hello all. My DD is enrolled at an independent home daycare (not a private corporation/franchise): $220/wk since 6 mos old. I provide breakfast, lunch, diapers/pull ups, and wipes. The day care provides 2 snacks. Uniforms were mandatory starting 18 mos.: $6.99 for screen printed logo t-shirt and $10.99 for screen printed logo gym shorts. My two year old is being promoted to the 3 year old class (potty trained (fairly consistent) and we will pay $180/wk. The uniform will consist of the "standard" uniform for the public schools in this area (peter pan collared shirt, skorts/pants or jumper - the sizes start at 2T).

After reading this, I am surprised that so many parents (or mothers) are shocked at the idea of uniforms at 2 years old. Based on my area, a large suburb near an East Coast metropolitan area, my experience seemed (note the past tense) to be the norm.

I would love to find a quality daycare that didn't cost an arm and a leg and provided the nurturing experience that my DD has had at this day care. At 2, she can count past 20, knows upper and lowercase letters, identifies animals, can communicate using very basic sign language, has been on field trips to the zoo, circus and a local civics program and is learning words by sight. In her new class she will also begin learning Spanish. Christmas party included Santa Claus and two elves. Easter party consisted of an Easter Bunny that scared most of the little ones (ha). Free picture opportunities during all special events. I am quite pleased with my DD's progress and find that the monetary sacrifice for food, supplies and uniforms is a minor inconvenience and less important that her good health and welfare.
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  #9  
Old 08-31-2009, 07:30 AM
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I think if the kids are going on a lot of outings a uniform might be beneficial for a group setting. That way they're easily identifiable to not only the providers but also the public so if one strays, they can be easily returned to the group (obviously we don't want to think of that happening but it can and it does) ...

As for providing Clorox wipes, crayons and all of that stuff ... I would think that would be included personally. I guess if the references all check out I'd give it a shot, but I'd be VERY quick to pull my daughter as soon as I heard something I didn't like from this place ... but that's just me ...
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Old 09-12-2009, 01:14 AM
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In my experience, my daughter is gong to a day care learning center. They teach my 3 year old daughter the numbers, the colors, the shapes and much more. Since she started going, her speech has improved tremendously. Sometimes she even corrects me, Ha! I think there are many day cares that have the kids watch TV all day long or play all day long and don't stimulate you child's little brains. What I pay and what I see from my daughter's learning process is worth the effort. I wouldn't change her day care for saving some bucks, even with this economy crisis.
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Old 09-12-2009, 05:31 AM
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I do chldcare in my home. I have kids between 5 months-5 yrs. I have 2 of my own. A 2 yr old and 5 yr old. My son, who is 2, can count to 20, knows the entire alphabet, knows about 30 signs in sign language, knows animals and their sounds, he has a v-tech tote N go computer, which he can turn on/off and set it to whatever he wants to work on(letters,numbers or whatever) So, you don't have to spend a lot of money. All it takes is someone who is willing to work with the children. Plus, not all children are the same. My son is eager to learn on the other hand, Ihave a dcb who will be 4 in Dec. He has no interest in learning. He would rather play all day. At home, this is what he does or watches tv I have no tv in my dc. At home, my son does watch Seasame St. and other educational shows. I think it's sad, especially when we work on the alphabets and the dcb doesn't know what letter it is, but my son can.
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Old 09-12-2009, 08:21 AM
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In regards to the last two posts...

I am very new at being a daycare provider, however, I've been a parent for about 14 years. In my mind, and perhaps I'm wrong, I do believe that learning should begin at home. Though the kids in my care do work on colors, counting, and our alphabet, I also believe that free play is extremely important. When my daughter was little (she's now 14) she could pick up any book and read a paragraph out of it at age 4. My son who just turned 5 can recognize letters and their sounds, can't yet read. I have worked equally with both of them. I have 2 daycare children (separate families) who are also 4 who can't sing the alphabet song or say the alphabet, let alone recognize the letters. These two boys can barely count to 10 either. A big part of me feels it's my duty to intervene as their care taker and teach them the things I think they should be learning. At the same time I find it EXTREMELY frustrating that the parents don't work with either one of them at all at home.
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Old 09-13-2009, 08:29 AM
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I also believe free play is important. The kids have plenty of that. It's amazing at some of the things they come up with. It's just blows me away sometimes.
The grandfather of the almost 4 yr old, doesn't seem to care. I try so hard to help the boy, because I don't want to see him struggle come school time. Now he won't start Kindergaraten until 2001/2012 year. So he does have time. But, around here, the kids are supposed to know a min. of things. For ex. the alphabet, min of counting to 10, their name, colors, shapes etc. Sometimes, I get so frustrated and think, well if his grandparent doesn't care, why should I? But I do care, that's who I am. This is the same boy who in the past month or so has started stuttering and it's getting worse. The grandfather just said that stuttering is more common in boys than girls. I have never heard of anything like that. But still, I think maybe he should see a doctor. Maybe he has other issues. IF he does, that's okay. It's better to find out now rather than later and perhaps nip in the bud. The boy doesn't go to the doctors either, because he is small for his age. He's barely 36 in tall and weighs about 25 lbs. His clothes size is 18-24 months. The grandfather doesn't like that the doctor says stuff about his size. I think the grandfather should grow up and put the child first. I have told the grandfather that I used to hear it about my son's size. He was almost 11 lbs at birth. So of course, he was only going to get bigger not smaller. For the first year and half, he was off the charts in height and weight. At his 2 yr old check-up, he didn't gain much (but of course is still within the percantage for his age) and the doctor said well, we have to keep an eye on that to make sure he keeps puttin weight on. I mean, first he complained because he was gaining too much and now, for now gaining enough. But still, I make sure my kids get their check-ups no matter how annoying the doctor can be. Okay, so for rattling.
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Old 09-14-2009, 01:50 AM
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Sounds like grandpa needs to remove his cranium from his rectum and put a little more effort forth to get this generation raised right....he's probably not going to be around or able to try it with the third generation.

What I'm saying is, if grandpa is raising this kid the same way he raised the one who brought this one into the world, maybe he should reassess his child rearing techniques so he doesn't get stuck raising the next batch.


As far as boys stuttering more than girls, I'm not a scientist, but it got me thinking.....I've never seen a little girl stutter, but have seen more than a few boys who stutter. That doesn't mean that a boy should stutter, but it makes me wonder about that.............?

I do know this-possessing a penis does not cause a stutter....I've had one for years, and never stuttered.

If he isn't getting his shots ( I think I recall you saying this in the past), the public school system is the best thing for him-they won't allow him in the front door without immunizations and proof of them, which requires a doctor visit.
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Old 09-19-2009, 12:47 PM
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Default you forgot to mention ...

what's your weekly tuition?

if you're getting a fair rate (for your area) then i don't see the problem.

as for uniforms: we teach them to dress for church. learning to present one's self appropriately is important and all too overlooked these days.

maybe the director just likes the image it projects to have the kids in uniforms. whatever... if she's providing safe and healthy learning envirnoment, who cares about the rest??
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Old 08-11-2010, 08:39 AM
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I am a provider and I am also a mom with three children ages 16 to 12 years old. I have been a provider for 12 years. Before that I was a social worker and I counseled teens with broken homes. It is embarrassing to hear parents complaining about how much they have to pay for childcare. Is it too much of a price to pay to have someone prepare and educate your child, attend to your child every needs in your absence? If that so, have you considered to work in the facility, or even volunteer to have your price reduce? What I found out from my experiences of suggesting so, many parents don't want to do the hardwork, they prefer to drop their children at the center, even on their day off. They considered it to be a "Me time". Providers job are hard; we are dealing with children and parents from different environment and spectrum. Also we have to employ people to help us do the job and the hours are so long. All we are asking, is that parent are considerate and respect us. Every facility hass rules and policies. If the rules don't work for you, it's fine, go somewhere else where the rules work for you. Do not come in this forum and trash other facilities. Help us raise our future leaders and make the world a better place for them.

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Old 08-11-2010, 04:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chickenhauler View Post
Sounds like you've enrolled your child in Himmler and Goebels and Goering child care center.

Uniforms? For what? They're TWO, it's not like they're having fashion wars.....at that age, we had all we could do to get our son to wear clothes! Thankfully he outgrew his hippy phase, and now is in his "cutoff shorts and that's it phase" for the summer.
haha funny
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Old 08-11-2010, 07:26 PM
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If he isn't getting his shots ( I think I recall you saying this in the past), the public school system is the best thing for him-they won't allow him in the front door without immunizations and proof of them, which requires a doctor visit.
Sure they will...all he has to do is sign a form stating it is against thier beliefs.
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Old 08-11-2010, 08:37 PM
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i don't think the uniform thing is SO insane...

it's probably in place because so many parents send their kids to daycare in overalls and snap up pants when they're potty training - or send them in shorts and a t shirt when it's 40 degrees outside.

i'm all for uniforms in school because of social reasons. my daughter's school doesn't have uniforms and i'm pretty much obsessed with her wardrobe. i iron her clothes - make sure her hairbows and nails/shoes match. as much as i hate to admit it, looks do matter - not only to the other kids, but to the teachers as well. it can be denied, but it makes a difference - period. i'd love it if i didn't have to iron and take off polish and buy new shoes and make hairbows. one outfit - every day - i'd love it.

sounds like a pretty high class daycare though to have uniforms AND book fees, supplies, etc.

i hate to ask, but i might as well - do the teachers at the daycare have early childhood degrees? they could have extra fees to cover the higher salaries - that's the ONLY reason i could think of. if that's not the case - i see no reason for the extra expense.
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Old 08-12-2010, 04:22 AM
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Why do some people always have to bring up "EDUCATION". Experience TRUMPS education everyday/everytime. Really, what is more important, a piece of paper or years of experience on the job.

Qualiticare....Just wondering.....how many children do you care for and how long have you been a provider.
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Old 08-12-2010, 05:56 AM
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i knew that would get a select few's juices flowing.

what other LOGICAL expense can you think of for this daycare charging for all these extras?

i've NEVER heard of a daycare charging for book or UNIFORMS on top of tuition. as i ALREADY said - the only expensive thing i can think of that this place might have that other centers DONT have is TEACHERS with DEGREES. seems to me as if they're running it like a school!

HEAVEN FORBID me think such a thing is possible! you do know that teachers gets paid more, right - or am i allowed to say that?
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Old 08-12-2010, 06:52 AM
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It really is no different than a school system charging book fees, sports fees, making the students wear uniforms, making them buy school supplies, etc. My kids went to a center for 4 years, and I always had to buy the basics in supplies, crayons, kleenex, markers, glue, etc, they gave us a list, on top of that I paid a registration fee each year, fieldtrip fees, and my weekly rate.

It is odd for a daycare to expect uniforms. Probably a higher end neighborhood where they "think" there services are worth more.

And really, are comments like "i knew that would get a select few's juices flowing." really necessary.
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Old 08-12-2010, 08:54 AM
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And really, are comments like "i knew that would get a select few's juices flowing." really necessary.
Only if one is trying to stir the pot. Not very attractive behavior for a Mod.
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Old 08-12-2010, 09:12 AM
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It really is no different than a school system charging book fees, sports fees, making the students wear uniforms, making them buy school supplies, etc. My kids went to a center for 4 years, and I always had to buy the basics in supplies, crayons, kleenex, markers, glue, etc, they gave us a list, on top of that I paid a registration fee each year, fieldtrip fees, and my weekly rate.

It is odd for a daycare to expect uniforms. Probably a higher end neighborhood where they "think" there services are worth more.
Just to chime in, it is true in my area that someone with a degree is paid more. The more degreed staff a center has would cost them more in salary expenses consequently increasing tuition rates. In the state I live in, a person that has a degree over someone who doesn't is at an extreme advantage because that boosts the center's staff education rating which can boost the center's star rating. Also in NC, a person that does not have Early Childhood credentials cannot hold a lead teacher position....only assistant.
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Old 08-12-2010, 09:19 AM
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Quote:
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Why do some people always have to bring up "EDUCATION". Experience TRUMPS education everyday/everytime. Really, what is more important, a piece of paper or years of experience on the job.

Qualiticare....Just wondering.....how many children do you care for and how long have you been a provider.
I think they are both equally important. I wouldn't send my children to an elementary school or high school where the teachers do not have a degree, I see no difference with preschool.

I also think that, while experience is highly valuable, it does not necessarily equal quality.....I have met many providers with 20+ years of experience and many of them have the worst run, dirtiest and highest turnover rates of children of any programs I have ever visited....and I have visited many.

On the other hand, I have also met providers without a degree and lots of experience who run fabulous programs, and many with very little experience who start and run awesome programs.

I think it depends on the individual provider. And, I also think it depends on what the parent wants/expects in a program.
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Old 08-12-2010, 09:35 AM
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It will obviously depend on the state and their regulations, area, etc you are in whether or not a "degree" will bring in more money. I know in our rural town, the most expensive daycare pays minimum wage, and one employee in particular has 6 of her own children in experience and over 15 years experience working as a preschool teacher in the same center, and she has no degree, but is damn good at what she does.
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Old 08-12-2010, 10:39 AM
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Only if one is trying to stir the pot. Not very attractive behavior for a Mod.
It was originally a legit and reasonable question to the OP and of course someone has to turn it into a debate. That person wasn't me. I was speaking my mind before the mod status and I'll continue to do so. There's only one person whose opinion of my behavior matters and that person isn't you. I refuse to be part of the childishness but continue arguing amongst yourselves.

Last edited by Michael; 08-12-2010 at 10:56 AM.
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Old 08-12-2010, 02:59 PM
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There's only one person whose opinion of my behavior matters and that person isn't you.



It's Michael, right???
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Old 08-12-2010, 07:30 PM
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There's only one person whose opinion of my behavior matters and that person isn't you.



It's Michael, right???
good guess
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Old 09-08-2010, 11:24 AM
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Sure they will...all he has to do is sign a form stating it is against thier beliefs.
So he can spread measles to a family with an infant at home too young to be immunized. 164,0000 children die from measles each year.
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Old 09-08-2010, 11:32 AM
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I think they are both equally important. I wouldn't send my children to an elementary school or high school where the teachers do not have a degree, I see no difference with preschool.

I also think that, while experience is highly valuable, it does not necessarily equal quality.....I have met many providers with 20+ years of experience and many of them have the worst run, dirtiest and highest turnover rates of children of any programs I have ever visited....and I have visited many.

On the other hand, I have also met providers without a degree and lots of experience who run fabulous programs, and many with very little experience who start and run awesome programs.

I think it depends on the individual provider. And, I also think it depends on what the parent wants/expects in a program.


I agree. Parents get to shop around and choose a daycare that fits their family and priorities. For some, teachers with a degree and an accredited preschool curriculum is important- and some are willing to pay for it. Here in MN having a CDA or higher (2 yr degree or more) entitles you to a 10% increase in your pay through county programs, and many charge a similar rate to cash clients. That said- I have met some "teachers" that were horrible providers, and some great childcare professionals with nothing beyond High School and whatever traing and seminars they attend that were wonderful, dedicated childcare professionals. A great provider will be made even better by furthering their education and training- and someone who shouldn't work with kids will likely remain unsuitable regardless of education.
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Old 09-09-2010, 07:36 PM
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So he can spread measles to a family with an infant at home too young to be immunized. 164,0000 children die from measles each year.
I just want to point out that you meant either 1,640,000 OR 164,000 children die each year from measles. I don't care which figure you're quoting, though, because both are wrong. Deaths in the US are fewer than 1 a year. There were only 140 cases reported in 2008 (the most recent year I found data for) and there are only 1-3 deaths per 1000 reported cases in the US. Even in the decade before the vax was introduced, there were 4-5 MILLION cases, and only 400-500 deaths. http://www.cdc.gov/media/pressrel/2008/r080821.htm

Okay, I did find the 164,000 figure in a document from the CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5847a2.htm (it's near the bottom of the first paragraph) but it's a worldwide figure from 2008 and is total deaths, not CHILD deaths. This document was published less than a year ago and predicts worldwide deaths this year to be less than 73,000.

Sorry to jump on you, but I really, really, REALLY hate to see statistics thrown around will-nilly. Especially when they're wrong.

Edit: I also feel the need to point out that these numbers are TOTAL reported cases, not just cases/deaths in children.
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Old 09-09-2010, 11:25 PM
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Many would be surprised to see the global death from the flu:

Although difficult to assess, these annual epidemics are thought to result in between three and five million cases of severe illness and between 250,000 and 500,000 deaths every year around the world.
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/facts...2003/fs211/en/

Again, mostly elderly but a HUGE amount.
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Old 10-08-2010, 11:23 AM
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Default Costly Childcare Centers

Sounds like you want to send your child to a more elite care center - and those cost money; if it requires uniforms for a 2 year old it's for snobs, and you can expect to pay for everything. My question is why? Do you think sending your child there will give you an elevated status? Perhaps you don't think what's good enough for the rest of our children is good enough for yours? Really, it's a ridiculous question, if you're spending that much money then expect your child to be educated. The money you pay is for teacher salaries and day-to-day operations - just like a private school. Don't be so incredulous that they would ask for supplies, just like a private school would were your child at that age (and I have no doubt your child will NOT be attending a public school).
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