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06-27-2018 01:43 PM
hwichlaz
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
In your car scenario, the car is still available to the owner. This is the difference. Their spouse/friend/roommate or whatever could drive them around, they could sit in the driveway playing their car stereo if they chose, whatever. The lein holder is not going to come reposses the car for 6 weeks so the car can have a little vacay time while demanding that payment still be made. If this happened you'd all be here crying in the forums, while continuing to charge your customers for services not rendered.
I still have to make my car payment when itís stuck in the repair shop
06-25-2018 06:11 AM
amberrose3dg
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josiegirl View Post
With that train of thought, how would you feel if your 'slot' was all of a sudden taken by another family, if it's not saved? Then it becomes drop-in care and that could be even a higher rate, plus you'd have to confirm it all the time. What family wants to work around that sort of unpredictable plan??
The ones that are too" cheap" to pay when they aren't there.
06-24-2018 03:36 AM
Josiegirl
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
as you say we pay for the "slot" that would mean that for a holiday that the daycare is closed there is no "slot" they are closed, that would be like paying for a reservation that doesn't exits.
With that train of thought, how would you feel if your 'slot' was all of a sudden taken by another family, if it's not saved? Then it becomes drop-in care and that could be even a higher rate, plus you'd have to confirm it all the time. What family wants to work around that sort of unpredictable plan??
06-23-2018 05:43 PM
Unregistered As a college educated (BA, Psych, emph. on Development), group family child care provider of 30 years, I charge a weekly set rate, whether your child is in attendance or not. I also have paid Holidays, (honored either the Friday before or Monday after if they fall on a weekend), 10 paid vacation days (equivalent to two weeks paid vacation), and 9 paid PTO days, accrued by industry standard formula based on hours worked. This equals 28 paid days off! I offer a coupon for one free week of care annually. An advance schedule of time off is provided for the year to allow for alternate caregiver arrangements, however, I reserve 4 PTO days for illness or emergency. Thank you to all of my families who over the years have supported my professionalism, and helped me sustain my longevity and commitment to my career. I especially want to thank former daycare children, who are now bringing their children to my in -home child care. And lastly, I thank my grown children, ages 30, 27, and 24 for their many sacrifices of home, personal space, and, too often, me; my husband, who listens, but never interferes, nor complains; my custodial grandchildren, ages 9, 5, and 4, who have learned to love caregiving, made valuable friends, and help out alot!
02-20-2018 06:39 AM
kathykats
Quote:
Originally Posted by A mom View Post
Our daycare provider charges only for the days my daughter is physically there so long as we tell them by the Sunday evening of that particular week. So we do not pay for holidays, we do not pay for our vacations, and we don't pay for any days I know in advance that she won't be there. They use this open communication system of scheduling to give their caretakers more flexibility in their own schedules. So no, not all providers charge for the "slot." Some actually charge for the care that is provided.
Does you provider give you a receipt for taxes? I give a receipt for taxes to my parents. They get about 35% back of what they pay me throughout the year. I also pay taxes on what I charge, so I charge a weekly fee as well, unless I am closed. They get 1 week a year off for vacation and I schedule my vacation then, they don't pay for that week. But it is 1/2 pay for any additional weeks, unless they bring the children a day or two, then it is full rate.
02-12-2018 11:03 AM
Leigh
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
as you say we pay for the "slot" that would mean that for a holiday that the daycare is closed there is no "slot" they are closed, that would be like paying for a reservation that doesn't exits.
There is no slot on Saturday nor Sunday (at most daycares). Would you expect a discount for those days, as well? Why not? It makes no sense to me that a person can not understand the logic to this.

I figure out what I need each year. I divide it by the number of children I am allowed to have in care. I plan for being closed for certain holidays and a few sick days. Maybe a few vacation days, if I am lucky. My rates are set based on this number that I must have yearly.

I certainly COULD let parents have days where they don't pay for closures, illness, vacation, etc. BUT, that number that I NEED does not change. So, I would just raise my rates to cover those closure days to ensure that I made my goal income. My clients are going to pay that number that I need to hit whether they pay it in higher rates with "free" days (that aren't truly free) or whether they pay it with a lower weekly fee that is the same every week.

Either way, my business needs to make a certain amount to stay solvent. I am going to get to that number or I won't stay in business.

If you don't like paying the same amount weekly, why not ask to pay a higher rate so you can feel like you're getting something for nothing?
02-07-2018 08:12 PM
BrynleeJean Its definitely legal
But they do have to have it in their policy or whatever handbook they give you to read and sign when you enroll.
They can't just not have it written and be like "oh I'm closed tomorrow but thought it would be nice if you paid me"
they don't usually do that its probably in their policy handbook that you signed, you just missed it

Good luck
01-22-2018 06:20 PM
mommyneedsadayoff
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
as you say we pay for the "slot" that would mean that for a holiday that the daycare is closed there is no "slot" they are closed, that would be like paying for a reservation that doesn't exits.
I think you are confused. Each daycare is allowed a certain amount of children that they are allowed to take. The slot you are referring to is not the number of days, it is the number of children a dc can can have enrolled. So if your daycare can only have eight children, you are paying for one of those eight slots. If you want to come back the day after a closed holiday and have your spot still available, then you pay regardless...or pay according to the CONTRACT YOU SIGNED.
01-22-2018 04:12 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Exactly my thoughts *Interested*
Sometimes I think parents whine more than children. You are paying for the slot, not for the hour. If you want it spelled out.... you have a yearly flat rate. It is broken down for your convenience. Or would you rather pay by the year?? The only thing to change this is what the policy makes exceptions to. Have you ever heard of salary pay? No matter how many hours you work, it is a flat pay. It is the same principle. Got a problem? Start your own day care and see what we are talking about, then maybe you would understand better. If we catered to everyones whims, we would watch your precious for free 24/7.
as you say we pay for the "slot" that would mean that for a holiday that the daycare is closed there is no "slot" they are closed, that would be like paying for a reservation that doesn't exits.
12-18-2017 12:18 PM
Cat Herder
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
It would certainly be a bit more understandable IF the school was still having to pay their employees on holidays, snow days, or other days they decide to be closed. However, WE ARE NOT PAID for any of those days that parents still pay....other than VETERANS DAY MEMORIAL DAY, CHRISTMAS DAY, THANKSGIVING DAY, & NY DAY.... So the preschool is winning and everyone else loses, including your child's teacher.
I know it seems that way but the simple truth is that bit of "extra" income is already figured into the years budget that decided tuition and pay scale. Payroll is one of the smaller costs associated with running a center.
12-18-2017 11:43 AM
Unregistered It would certainly be a bit more understandable IF the school was still having to pay their employees on holidays, snow days, or other days they decide to be closed. However, WE ARE NOT PAID for any of those days that parents still pay....other than VETERANS DAY MEMORIAL DAY, CHRISTMAS DAY, THANKSGIVING DAY, & NY DAY.... So the preschool is winning and everyone else loses, including your child's teacher.
12-06-2017 12:07 PM
Snowmom
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
This is an ignorant statement. Of course it's less than minimum wage. Why would you even be working if your just giving exactly what you make directly to someone else, only you pay taxes on the money, and gas etc. so your actually in the red. They watch more than one child at a time Thad where the profit is.
Bolded:
It is NEVER a guarantee that we will have a full roster. Never.
There are years I net less than minimum wage and years I have net triple the minimum wage.
Paid holiday closures are the only perk I get in this job.
If people want to balk at paying those, they are not people I want in my home and in my business.
12-06-2017 10:08 AM
LysesKids
Quote:
Originally Posted by bklsmum View Post
We also have a lot of expenses that go along with providing childcare! Bottom line is that if you don't like paying what you agreed to pay then that is YOUR problem, not your provider's. Find another provider who's policies you do agree with but don't agree to something and then bitch about it being unfair later!
Exactly... It's why I have my families read my policies on the website before they sign the contract... They don't like the rules, then don't set up an interview lol
12-06-2017 09:45 AM
LysesKids
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
This is an ignorant statement. Of course it's less than minimum wage. Why would you even be working if your just giving exactly what you make directly to someone else, only you pay taxes on the money, and gas etc. so your actually in the red. They watch more than one child at a time Thad where the profit is.
Darlin' after I paid my taxes, food, extra utilities, gas to buy supplies, etc I made just 2,792 last year... I had 4,000 in medical bills & 10,000 alone in the last 2 months due to pneumonia for this year & I don't have medical insurance because TN didn't expand Obama care... I am so negative already I'm about to file bankruptcy, I'm probably more in the red than if I worked a minimum wage job... at least then I wouldn't be paying 15% taxes instead of just the employees share ( BTW, I'm a single with no spouse covering other costs... my income is the only one); not every provider has 6-10 kids... I'm allowed 4 at most because I do infants only
12-06-2017 06:25 AM
Blackcat31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
This is an ignorant statement. Of course it's less than minimum wage. Why would you even be working if your just giving exactly what you make directly to someone else, only you pay taxes on the money, and gas etc. so your actually in the red. They watch more than one child at a time Thad where the profit is.
This is equally as ignorant.

Not all parents work for minimum wage.
The child care provider pays taxes on the income as well.
My profit isn't from the fact that I watch more than one child at a time.
My profit comes from the quality care provided to the children in attendance, whether that be one or 10 children.

...and to say "Why would you be working just to give the money you are making directly to someone else?" is akin to providers that wonder why parents have children they bring directly to daycare for someone else to "raise".

Bottom line for all parents is if you can't afford child care, stay home with your child and provide care yourself.
If you can afford child care and you choose to use it, do so but stop complaining about it.
12-06-2017 05:00 AM
bklsmum
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
This is an ignorant statement. Of course it's less than minimum wage. Why would you even be working if your just giving exactly what you make directly to someone else, only you pay taxes on the money, and gas etc. so your actually in the red. They watch more than one child at a time Thad where the profit is.
We also have a lot of expenses that go along with providing childcare! Bottom line is that if you don't like paying what you agreed to pay then that is YOUR problem, not your provider's. Find another provider who's policies you do agree with but don't agree to something and then bitch about it being unfair later!
12-05-2017 03:55 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by AC23 View Post
If it was in the contract you must honor it or give notice and leave. After seeing what all goes into becoming a provider they deserve these days. Back ground checks, many inspections on safety, fire, public health conducted. Trainings in CPR/First Aid/Rescue breathing along with many other areas to include depending on the state a minimum of 6 or more training hours a year. The list could go on criteria that must be met and the pay that many home providers are much less than someone working in a child care center. For instance a home provider may charge for arguement sake $200 a week for up to 50 hours a week. That breaks down to $4.00 an hour. Gee that means that you or anyone paying that a week is paying less than minimum wage to someone that is watching their child. I think paying for holidays or other closures is more than worth it. I think most people under estimate what goes into child care profession along with the importance of this area. what price tag are you willing to put on your child? I know I wouldn't think twice about paying that or more for my infant. Currently I choose not to work so I can stay home with her because I would rather scrap by than allow my child to be put in child care with someone I don't know.
This is an ignorant statement. Of course it's less than minimum wage. Why would you even be working if your just giving exactly what you make directly to someone else, only you pay taxes on the money, and gas etc. so your actually in the red. They watch more than one child at a time Thad where the profit is.
12-04-2017 01:15 PM
Blackcat31 I am pretty sure that even if child care was open 24/7/365 parents would still be complaining

I have ONE question. Just ONE.

Is it really that horrible to pay the person that provides love and care to YOUR child a day's pay, a week's pay or even a months pay while they take a MUCH needed break?!

I mean the provider cares for the ONE thing that should be THE most important person in your life so why is paying them for the small amount of time off they take that big of a deal?

The fact that so many parents simply don't see the value in that says ALOT about parents today.

I'm glad my kids didn't ever have to feel like they weren't worthy of a few extra days pay that I still paid their provider when she closed.

It made their time with our provider that much more important and worth it because my provider was healthy (BOTH physically and mentally) because she didn't have the added stress of worrying about income due to vacation.
12-04-2017 01:06 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meeko View Post
You probably have a car payment. So I am going to assume that if for some reason you broke your leg and couldn't drive for 6 weeks, that you will be calling the lien holder and crying about how it's not fair you have to pay the monthly payment when you can't drive the car.......

Things happen. You still have to pay for your car.
Things happen. You still have to pay your daycare provider.
In your car scenario, the car is still available to the owner. This is the difference. Their spouse/friend/roommate or whatever could drive them around, they could sit in the driveway playing their car stereo if they chose, whatever. The lein holder is not going to come reposses the car for 6 weeks so the car can have a little vacay time while demanding that payment still be made. If this happened you'd all be here crying in the forums, while continuing to charge your customers for services not rendered.
11-28-2017 11:51 AM
Ariana childcare is a very unique self employment category. We are usually in high demand and can set terms that work for us.

I do know many businesses that set their own terms but very few can be compared to childcare. The only thing that comes somewhat close is season tickets to a sports game. You buy the tickets and pay for them whether you attend the games or not. No one complains about that because they are getting something out of it. Like childcare you knew upfront you had to pay for it whether or not you attend. When parents donít directly benefit from a service they donít see the value in it (not all parents thankfully).
11-24-2017 07:04 AM
daycarediva as a parent with kids in music, karate, and other sports.

We pay regardless. Bad weather? No football? Pay the same.

Music store is on vacation for a week at christmas, we pay our regular payments for instruments (even though they are unavailable to service them if needed) AND lessons, even though my kids will be missing two each.

If I charged even $1 more per day it would add up to more money over the year than my paid time off.

and again, look around at different daycares. It's highly unlikely that was the ONLY one in your area. Call the local licensing office and ask for referrals. You should be able to get a copy of the contract you signed. If you don't like the policies, speak to them about it- look elsewhere- don't sign and complain.

I have two parents who I wrote a special contract up for.

Parent 1- We added up the days her school age child would attend on scheduled days off, 1/2 days, etc (I don't take her regularly, just days off of school or half days) and she pays me a set monthly amount that covers her time here. So instead of owing me over $300 the week of christmas-new years, her rate is spread out over the year. She has a balance due if she pulls before the school year ends, though.

parent 2- we added up the 10 holidays/year that I am closed, and she pays additional money per week. She's actually paying MORE than she would if she paid like everyone else, but she still feels like she gets a break. She doesn't need alternate care (I only close for major holidays, eg. christmas day). but she doesn't get PTO at her job, so I guess the small break that week helps her.
11-23-2017 04:30 AM
Josiegirl
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgruntled Dad View Post
I had never thought about hiring a nanny before and most likely wouldn't because I think social experience my child receives by being with other kids is good for her.

I have never seen the contract but its the only daycare in the area that had slots. so would have had to use it regardless.

The money is not the issue. I'm and overseas government contractor and make close to $200k/yr. Like I said its a perception thing. I may not agree with it but its whats available. Everyone has their own opinion on the matter. so, whether your for it or against it is up to you.
Considering my daycare 'scam' allows me to make about 44K a year, and you make 200K a year, I can see where our perceptions would be vastly different. And out of my 44K a year come all the taxes and expenses of providing quality childcare so my 'scam' makes a profit of *maybe* 16K where I can actually provide for my own household, help my 2 dds pay off their college tuition, pay cellphone/vet bills, save(hahaha) and survive. So please tell me again why I should NOT charge per enrollment and just attendance, because any provider knows for a fact, that a dcf will always do what works for them and go the free route. A week such as this one, would give me 3 days pay as opposed to the 5 day rate I'll be getting. I wouldn't be able to take any recharge vacation time during Christmas, to spend with my own family or return to care for others' families refreshed and ready. Being a provider is a high burn-out career already and to work making even less money would extinguish any flame I have left.

Just wanted to give a more personal take on the perspective of the childcare scam.
11-23-2017 02:01 AM
Disgruntled Dad I had never thought about hiring a nanny before and most likely wouldn't because I think social experience my child receives by being with other kids is good for her.

I have never seen the contract but its the only daycare in the area that had slots. so would have had to use it regardless.

The money is not the issue. I'm and overseas government contractor and make close to $200k/yr. Like I said its a perception thing. I may not agree with it but its whats available. Everyone has their own opinion on the matter. so, whether your for it or against it is up to you.
11-22-2017 05:33 PM
Leigh
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgruntled Dad View Post
Our day care cost $245/week for 4 days/week. There are 208 days in the year 2017 that my child will be scheduled for day care. According to google there are approximately 10 holidays this year. Thatís 198 days that the day care would be open for us assuming that all holidays fall on my childís scheduled days. Thatís $3.10 more a day or $12.40/week for a total of $257.40 per week. So back to the perception $257.40 per week looks better than getting charge $61.25 for a day that no service is rendered and now you have to go pay some else to take care of your child.
Not sure if I stated this earlier but I do understand having to pay for the days if I cancel.
Why not ask your provider to allow you to pay that $257.40 per week if it is easier for you?

I don't charge based on attendance because I don't set my rates based on attendance. I figure what I need to bring in for the year to cover expenses and salary, then I divide what I need by the number of spaces that I have. That's how I set rates. If I gave "free" days for holidays, I'd have to add that into the regular rate in order to make my goal income. Believe it or not, we're not getting rich in this business...55% of what I bring in goes right back out in EXPECTED expenses. It is more when a dishwasher, washing machine, water heater or something goes out (because they get used a LOT more in a daycare home than another home, we replace appliances more often) or when a child causes damages.

I would certainly allow a parent to pay me in whatever way works for them as long as I get my yearly tuition. I've had payments weekly, every other week, twice a month, once a month, even had one parent pay quarterly in advance. All that matters to me is that tuition gets paid. Perhaps your provider would work with you to find a payment schedule that works for you?
11-22-2017 12:26 PM
mommyneedsadayoff
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgruntled Dad View Post
Our day care cost $245/week for 4 days/week. There are 208 days in the year 2017 that my child will be scheduled for day care. According to google there are approximately 10 holidays this year. Thatís 198 days that the day care would be open for us assuming that all holidays fall on my childís scheduled days. Thatís $3.10 more a day or $12.40/week for a total of $257.40 per week. So back to the perception $257.40 per week looks better than getting charge $61.25 for a day that no service is rendered and now you have to go pay some else to take care of your child.
Not sure if I stated this earlier but I do understand having to pay for the days if I cancel.
But that is your perception. An extra $12-15 a week may not seem like a big deal to you, but to many parents calling around for rates, hearing $140 versus $155 IS a major deal. Keep in mind that many also have more than one child so for some, it could be more like $100+ more dollars a month. I guess, in my case, I am competing with other in home daycares and the fees are already low, so in order to actually get clients at a higher fee, I have to offer WAY more things than just "unpaid" holidays. I have to offer curriculum, organic food, all of the newest and latest toys and developmental strategies, and most importantly, "flexibility" in my hours and policies, ect. Parents want more and more for their money. The more you charge, the more they expect. Most of the people who spend higher amounts on childcare get a nanny for their own convenience and the ability to be in control or they go to a center which offers 12 hour days and rarely closes. So, some parents are willing and able to spend more money, but rarely do they spend it on something intangible, like vacation time. If you feel it is wrong to be charged when the daycare is closed, then you will still feel it is wrong even if you are paying upfront for it each week, versus on the actual week. Perception is one thing, but people are not stupid.

The problem is the mentality that daycare is not a business and is not allowed to operate as such. The other issue is that parents do not seem to understand that their child is a piece of the pie that makes the daycare operate. Think of it like a timeshare. There are only so many spots we are allowed to have, so if you want the spot, you pay for it year round, even if it is not being used or is not able to be used (when closed). The fee you pay each week gives you the comfort that your childcare, even if closed for a day or two, will be there for you those other 200+days. But each spot comes at a price, so if each spot is worth $7500 a year, then whether you pay it in 52 equal payments, or in 48, it is all the same. In fact, I highly doubt any provider would ever turn down the offer of being prepaid, so if it really bothers you, then add an extra $50 to all your payments and you will accrue a balance to be used at the holidays. This is something all parents should be doing on their own anyway(you know...emergency fund and whatnot) and they should not need a daycare to enforce their budgeting for them. We can all perceive situations in our own way, but part of being an adult is to plan for reality. It shows maturity and responsibility for ones self and family. And the reality is that you can choose which daycare fits you best, so if you want to pay higher fees and no vacation time or lower fees 52 weeks a year, then search for the daycare that offers it!
11-22-2017 11:22 AM
storybookending
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgruntled Dad View Post
P.S. If I had paid all year for my child to go then decided in mid November that I no longer need the services you just made a little extra that year.

Donít worry though the next largest scam in American do it the same way. Colleges and other schools. They donít give back tuition when there is a snow day or the teacher calls out and cancels classes (college). would you expect to pay for guitar lesson if the instructor canceled?
It depends what the contract states. Find a daycare that doesnít charge for holidays/days off if thatís what you are looking for. YOU signed a contract saying you would pay for those days. No one forced your hand. If you donít like it, leave.
11-22-2017 11:20 AM
Blackcat31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgruntled Dad View Post
Our day care cost $245/week for 4 days/week. There are 208 days in the year 2017 that my child will be scheduled for day care. According to google there are approximately 10 holidays this year. Thatís 198 days that the day care would be open for us assuming that all holidays fall on my childís scheduled days. Thatís $3.10 more a day or $12.40/week for a total of $257.40 per week. So back to the perception $257.40 per week looks better than getting charge $61.25 for a day that no service is rendered and now you have to go pay some else to take care of your child.
Not sure if I stated this earlier but I do understand having to pay for the days if I cancel.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgruntled Dad View Post
P.S. If I had paid all year for my child to go then decided in mid November that I no longer need the services you just made a little extra that year.

Donít worry though the next largest scam in American do it the same way. Colleges and other schools. They donít give back tuition when there is a snow day or the teacher calls out and cancels classes (college). would you expect to pay for guitar lesson if the instructor canceled?

Can I ask why not hire a nanny?

That way they work FOR you and YOU get to dictate everything.... including costs and what days they work/don't work.

Why did you choose to enroll in family child care or a center verses hiring a nanny?
11-22-2017 11:16 AM
Disgruntled Dad P.S. If I had paid all year for my child to go then decided in mid November that I no longer need the services you just made a little extra that year.

Donít worry though the next largest scam in American do it the same way. Colleges and other schools. They donít give back tuition when there is a snow day or the teacher calls out and cancels classes (college). would you expect to pay for guitar lesson if the instructor canceled?
11-22-2017 11:06 AM
Disgruntled Dad
Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyneedsadayoff View Post
The current perception of daycare is that it's too expensive. What you are asking us to do is to make it even more expensive per week or per month to account for the days we are closed for vacation and holidays. When you try to sell that to parents in reality, it means an increased price to a point that is higher than other daycares in the area which means you may have a hard time getting clients. Parents like to worry about vacation and holiday pay close to the holidays, but when they sign up in March it is the last thing on their mind and obviously not an issue because they sign the contracts. At that point it is about the money they are out each week or month, not the holiday pay. It comes November when the holiday season is rolling around and all of a sudden it's a problem. That's when you get into daycare Hoppers who will leave right before vacation time for providers to get out of paying for it. so you can charge a steady fee throughout the year or you can charge much more per week or month to account for not paying for those handful of vacations and holidays. Either way you're going to be called too expensive or unfair because you're taking time off and still being paid for it. It's really a no-win situation for the provider in terms of getting grief about their worth. This is why we have contracts and this is why you should read them before you sign them.
Our day care cost $245/week for 4 days/week. There are 208 days in the year 2017 that my child will be scheduled for day care. According to google there are approximately 10 holidays this year. Thatís 198 days that the day care would be open for us assuming that all holidays fall on my childís scheduled days. Thatís $3.10 more a day or $12.40/week for a total of $257.40 per week. So back to the perception $257.40 per week looks better than getting charge $61.25 for a day that no service is rendered and now you have to go pay some else to take care of your child.
Not sure if I stated this earlier but I do understand having to pay for the days if I cancel.
11-22-2017 07:33 AM
mommyneedsadayoff
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgruntled Dad View Post
I totally get that in your line of work you should be paid when you are retrieving supplies for the job, because you are providing a service during those hours. You wouldnít expect to be paid for that time if you were shopping for your self during that time should you?

However for a business that provides services such as child care: they should not charge you for days/time when they are not providing a service. They should plan ahead for this and charge appropriately throughout the year to cover expenses such as closed hours doing administrative items, holidays, and anticipation average of days closed annually. If nothing more than for perception.

If I pay for a month of internet and there is a problem where it doesnít work Iím credit for time as long it the problem is on the service providers end.
The current perception of daycare is that it's too expensive. What you are asking us to do is to make it even more expensive per week or per month to account for the days we are closed for vacation and holidays. When you try to sell that to parents in reality, it means an increased price to a point that is higher than other daycares in the area which means you may have a hard time getting clients. Parents like to worry about vacation and holiday pay close to the holidays, but when they sign up in March it is the last thing on their mind and obviously not an issue because they sign the contracts. At that point it is about the money they are out each week or month, not the holiday pay. It comes November when the holiday season is rolling around and all of a sudden it's a problem. That's when you get into daycare Hoppers who will leave right before vacation time for providers to get out of paying for it. so you can charge a steady fee throughout the year or you can charge much more per week or month to account for not paying for those handful of vacations and holidays. Either way you're going to be called too expensive or unfair because you're taking time off and still being paid for it. It's really a no-win situation for the provider in terms of getting grief about their worth. This is why we have contracts and this is why you should read them before you sign them.
11-22-2017 05:51 AM
Blackcat31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgruntled Dad View Post
However for a business that provides services such as child care: they should not charge you for days/time when they are not providing a service. They should plan ahead for this and charge appropriately throughout the year to cover expenses such as closed hours doing administrative items, holidays, and anticipation average of days closed annually. If nothing more than for perception.
I edited your second paragraph. It should read:

"However for parents that have small children needing services such as child care: they should plan ahead for this and budget appropriately throughout the year to cover expenses such as closed hours doing administrative items, holidays, and anticipation average of days closed annually."
11-22-2017 04:29 AM
Josiegirl
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgruntled Dad View Post
I totally get that in your line of work you should be paid when you are retrieving supplies for the job, because you are providing a service during those hours. You wouldnít expect to be paid for that time if you were shopping for your self during that time should you?

However for a business that provides services such as child care: they should not charge you for days/time when they are not providing a service. They should plan ahead for this and charge appropriately throughout the year to cover expenses such as closed hours doing administrative items, holidays, and anticipation average of days closed annually. If nothing more than for perception.

If I pay for a month of internet and there is a problem where it doesnít work Iím credit for time as long it the problem is on the service providers end.
You don't pay your internet if it goes off for awhile? I always get charged unless I cancel.
Maybe all those of you who are complaining about being charged for a provider's day off, should become a provider. You'd be more understanding of it all. And really, what difference would it make if we charge a constant rate through out the year to charge time off or if we up our rates to include PTO but not charge for our days off? You'd be complaining about that too. Thank God all of my dcfs appreciate my work I do with their children and respect a provider's need for down time too. I don't abuse it and they're well aware of it when they enroll and READ their contract.

Sigh one of the age old gripes from people on the other side of our perspective.
11-21-2017 11:28 PM
Disgruntled Dad
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike View Post
A lot of people don't understand how business works. The hours we are doing something for them is our only working hours.

In my reno business, I sometimes work by the hour. I learned long ago that even if I know what materials I will need for the day, don't get that, then go to work. Go to the job site first, then go back out to get materials. I've even had cases where I ran out to get materials in the middle of the day, and at the end of the day, they would say I only worked 7 hours because I was gone for an hour.
I totally get that in your line of work you should be paid when you are retrieving supplies for the job, because you are providing a service during those hours. You wouldnít expect to be paid for that time if you were shopping for your self during that time should you?

However for a business that provides services such as child care: they should not charge you for days/time when they are not providing a service. They should plan ahead for this and charge appropriately throughout the year to cover expenses such as closed hours doing administrative items, holidays, and anticipation average of days closed annually. If nothing more than for perception.

If I pay for a month of internet and there is a problem where it doesnít work Iím credit for time as long it the problem is on the service providers end.
11-10-2017 08:51 PM
lovemykidstoo
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
QUIT YELLING!

We use inside voices here
LMAO BC. I love your response. Hahahah!
11-10-2017 03:30 PM
Blackcat31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I love this. Providers that charge on holidays or inclement weather days use that as an advantage to get paid time off. They claim for their profession to be such a hassle especially when having children of their own but what I know they're aware of is, they all know this prior to making the decision to become childcare providers. Keep in mind, child care providers, the consideration of not charging for these days are allowing the parents to pay who is available when you're not. Yes it only makes sense to abide by policy but even still, STOP ROBBING THE PARENTS BECAUSE YOU DECIDE YOU DON'T WANT TO GET YOUR LAZY ASSES OUT OF BED DUE TO A LITTLE SNOW ON THE GROUND. THE SOUTH DOESN'T GET NEARLY AS MUCH SNOW AS THE NORTH AND SCHOOL IS STILL GOING, WORKING IS STILL FLOWING.
QUIT YELLING!

We use inside voices here
11-10-2017 02:49 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by A mom View Post
Our daycare provider charges only for the days my daughter is physically there so long as we tell them by the Sunday evening of that particular week. So we do not pay for holidays, we do not pay for our vacations, and we don't pay for any days I know in advance that she won't be there. They use this open communication system of scheduling to give their caretakers more flexibility in their own schedules. So no, not all providers charge for the "slot." Some actually charge for the care that is provided.
I love this. Providers that charge on holidays or inclement weather days use that as an advantage to get paid time off. They claim for their profession to be such a hassle especially when having children of their own but what I know they're aware of is, they all know this prior to making the decision to become childcare providers. Keep in mind, child care providers, the consideration of not charging for these days are allowing the parents to pay who is available when you're not. Yes it only makes sense to abide by policy but even still, STOP ROBBING THE PARENTS BECAUSE YOU DECIDE YOU DON'T WANT TO GET YOUR LAZY ASSES OUT OF BED DUE TO A LITTLE SNOW ON THE GROUND. THE SOUTH DOESN'T GET NEARLY AS MUCH SNOW AS THE NORTH AND SCHOOL IS STILL GOING, WORKING IS STILL FLOWING.
09-15-2017 10:22 AM
storybookending I understand this is an old thread, I've actually read it a few times before. I started out just last summer. I didn't charge for holidays or limit their amount of days off which I have found to be a mistake.

Due to current ages I have 6 fillable spaces. I have 4 filled with children that have been here since the beginning not paying for holidays or days their children just don't come for whatever reason.

I have a sibling set ages 3 and 1. They do not attend on Mondays. I will grandfather them in and never ask them to pay for Mondays but after they age out I will only be taking full time children, or parents willing to pay the full weekly rate if they do have a day off. I may state when it is time to renew contracts that this family is only allowed 5 days off from their Tues-Friday schedule going forward. Mom was open to it when I started but I wasn't thinking long term and told her she didn't have to pay when they weren't here. I don't see myself ever charging this family for my holidays and I'll just consider them grandfathered in. As far as I know there are no plans for another child for this family. Mom said maybe if they had a different dad LOL.

My 3rd child is also 3. She is full time but does not pay for holidays or days mom has off. Mom honestly doesn't take off that much and when she does it is usually a day the schools are closed when I have the option of picking up the school aged older siblings of my youngest dcb. Next September she will start 4K and bus here in time for lunch and nap and honestly spend only 2-3 awake hours here before mom picks up. Her older brother did this last year and she paid for full days for him. I don't feel as bad losing money on the few days she's off because of this. I will probably never charge her holidays/days off. She's more than paid up considering the 4K schedule in this area. I assume this family is done having kids, mom has 4, dad has 13 including moms two youngest.. but honestly this fact right here and the fact that I never asked has me wondering some days.

My last of the original 4 is my niece, her mother is also my best friend. Doesn't pay when she's off, doesn't pay holidays, doesn't pay the whole month of August when she's off. I lose so much money having her here. I would never dream of asking them to pay any of this time, although some days I do hold a little bit of resentment. This child is a handful but honestly she's the reason I started daycare and I love her more than anything else in this world. Serious talks will be had when they decide to have a second child. I can't afford to take a loss like this on two children.

The above 4 children also pay $2 less a day than all future enrollees that did not start the summer I opened my doors.

Then there is the ones that didn't start that summer..

About 6 months in to starting daycare I started an infant. He is currently 9.5 months old. I stupidly cannot remember what is in that contract as I just edited the master document and didn't save a copy of what they had signed. Live and learn. I believe I had holidays paid. Mom paid for Memorial Day and Labor Day. The week of the 4th of July I also took off Monday the 3rd. She asked me that Friday what she owed and I just charged her for 3 days so didn't take the 4th paid. I don't charge for any extra days I take off other than the holidays listed in the contract and got myself all confused having everyone on different contracts. All contracts renew at the New Year so I will make sure I have it right this time.
In addition to holidays this child gets 10 days off for whatever reason that the parents do not have to pay. The child has missed 3 days of those 10 so far. They reset in January and do not roll over. Baby was not planned has two older siblings in elementary school and mom got her tubes tied so there will not be another for this family.

My 6th child just started Sept 1st. Had to pay Labor Day having just started the Friday before. Also gets 10 whatever unpaid days. All other holidays listed in my contract are paid. Mom mentioned that dad wants another. He has a high schooler and they have a 7 year old and the 2 year old together.

Still learning as I go about this! Sorry for the long post and props to anyone who made it through. I feel the current contract that I have my 6th child on now is great thanks to things I have read on this site. It'll just be a few years of losing income on my first few families. I do owe them a lot for helping me open my doors, I literally didn't even have furniture when I started and the kids ate at an outdoor table in my dining room until that all came in. I might've walked in my house if I were them and walked right out.
09-15-2017 07:33 AM
LysesKids
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
Sounds like your daycare has issues with communication.
I'd discuss this with the director or the owner.
Parents have a right to know in advance which days the daycare will be open or closed.
The only exception is severe illness last minute like was my case the week... How did I know I would get Pneumonia and have to close no warning. The parents all knew I wasn't feeling well, but I tried to stay open anyway. They were the ones that finally got me to go to the Dr's
09-15-2017 06:58 AM
Blackcat31
Quote:
Originally Posted by LouLou View Post
What about when I take my child to daycare on their scheduled day and they are "close" for staff conference and training without prior announcement.
Sounds like your daycare has issues with communication.
I'd discuss this with the director or the owner.
Parents have a right to know in advance which days the daycare will be open or closed.
09-15-2017 06:55 AM
LouLou What about when I take my child to daycare on their scheduled day and they are "close" for staff conference and training without prior announcement.
03-24-2017 01:07 PM
LysesKids
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I get it, but I feel like daycares take advantage of this, having days off such as good friday, black Friday? And why in the world does a daycare need "inservice " day?
In service days usually means the provider is taking a state training that day... in some states weekdays are the only time classes are offered and most are mandatory if we want to stay licensed. My families all know the first week in January, when my scheduled days off are for the entire year, with the exception of maybe one or two classes by years end and some of us don't take Good Friday , Easter or even minor Federal Holidays off... we each run differently
03-24-2017 07:32 AM
Jupadia
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I get it, but I feel like daycares take advantage of this, having days off such as good friday, black Friday? And why in the world does a daycare need "inservice " day?
It's not taking advantage when you have days off that are planned and listed in the contract. In fact I have both Easter Monday and good Friday off. Both days are listed in my contract and I get paid for them. I'm not overly religious but use the time to rest and recharge.
03-24-2017 07:17 AM
Snowmom
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I get it, but I feel like daycares take advantage of this, having days off such as good friday, black Friday? And why in the world does a daycare need "inservice " day?
I include Good Friday in my 12 paid holidays off per year.
Good Friday is my Easter holiday.

I take 2 days at Thanksgiving to spend with my family. One of which is the day after Thanksgiving, which happens to be Black Friday...do I even care that the retail industry has dubbed it a name? Not even in the least.

One of the main reasons clients chose in-home daycares is the family feel (and the cheaper costs), yet don't expect us to actually HAVE family needs ourselves. I truly don't understand it.
03-24-2017 06:37 AM
Mike
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
There is a lot more to operating a business than just those times in which we are caring for the kids.
A lot of people don't understand how business works. The hours we are doing something for them is our only working hours.

In my reno business, I sometimes work by the hour. I learned long ago that even if I know what materials I will need for the day, don't get that, then go to work. Go to the job site first, then go back out to get materials. I've even had cases where I ran out to get materials in the middle of the day, and at the end of the day, they would say I only worked 7 hours because I was gone for an hour.
03-24-2017 06:06 AM
Blackcat31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I get it, but I feel like daycares take advantage of this, having days off such as good friday, black Friday? And why in the world does a daycare need "inservice " day?
Daycare's taking advantage?.... hardly. There is so much more to this business that you (general you as a client) see/understands.

I am open and care for kids 50 hours a week

I spend approximately 20 hours a week doing other daycare related things (prepping, trainings, shopping, cleaning etc)

There is a lot more to operating a business than just those times in which we are caring for the kids.

I'd rather take a Wednesday or a random Monday off but instead I try to ease the issue closing causes for clients and close during days where most families are off themselves or can easily find alternate care. Those days are usually holidays or days near holidays.
03-24-2017 04:25 AM
bklsmum
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I get it, but I feel like daycares take advantage of this, having days off such as good friday, black Friday? And why in the world does a daycare need "inservice " day?
Many people observe Good Friday as a holy day and most people have black Friday off. As far as "inservice" days, daycares have required training they have to do and some are only offered during working hours.
03-24-2017 03:49 AM
Unregistered I get it, but I feel like daycares take advantage of this, having days off such as good friday, black Friday? And why in the world does a daycare need "inservice " day?
01-25-2017 12:11 PM
Cat Herder
Quote:
Originally Posted by hwichlaz View Post
I don't charge if I'm closed, but that's because the majority of my clients have to then pay someone else to care for their kids. Most are deputies, firefighters, etc. BUT, I'm open for holidays that aren't generally celebrated....so in those instances I charge everyone normally scheduled for that day. Basically....if I'm open I get paid, if I close I do not.

This is the norm where I live, or I'd do it differently. Unfortunately for me, it's what the market supports.
Same here. That is why my rates are based on a 50 week tuition year, instead of a 52 week calendar year. The result is the same; I am paid for my two week vacation.

You live, you learn, you manage your risk.
01-24-2017 06:09 PM
hwichlaz I don't charge if I'm closed, but that's because the majority of my clients have to then pay someone else to care for their kids. Most are deputies, firefighters, etc. BUT, I'm open for holidays that aren't generally celebrated....so in those instances I charge everyone normally scheduled for that day. Basically....if I'm open I get paid, if I close I do not.

This is the norm where I live, or I'd do it differently. Unfortunately for me, it's what the market supports.
01-13-2017 01:30 PM
Leigh
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Herder View Post
The issue, most likely, has nothing to do with payroll. More likely it is due to mortgage, business taxes, insurances, supplies, maintenance, etc. Payroll, in my experience, was not the biggest expense for owners. It was already figured into the total annual expenses, before deciding on tuition rate. The way to save money was to hire less experienced providers for less pay.
Exactly this. You figure rates by ANNUAL expenses and break it up into weekly (or whatever) payments. If I were to NOT charge for days off, I'd have to build those expenses into my rates to cover them. I STILL need the same amount annually to meet my expenses and pay myself a salary.
01-13-2017 10:44 AM
Cat Herder
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I've worked at child care centers and I think charging for holidays is really just a way for the center's owner to collect extra money. At my center, the parents paid a flat weekly rate even for the weeks that had a holiday or inclement weather. Yet, all of the employees were hourly so we were not paid for the holiday or day off. The child care owner just collected that extra money from that day off and did not have to pay anyone but herself (she was also the director).

I don't understand when people say "well you're salaried in your job and get paid for the holiday so you should pay". That would be a valid point if the employees at the center were salaried which they aren't. You're only paying the greedy owner. BTW I have no children, just a former child care worker.
The issue, most likely, has nothing to do with payroll. More likely it is due to mortgage, business taxes, insurances, supplies, maintenance, etc. Payroll, in my experience, was not the biggest expense for owners. It was already figured into the total annual expenses, before deciding on tuition rate. The way to save money was to hire less experienced providers for less pay.
01-13-2017 09:27 AM
Unregistered I've worked at child care centers and I think charging for holidays is really just a way for the center's owner to collect extra money. At my center, the parents paid a flat weekly rate even for the weeks that had a holiday or inclement weather. Yet, all of the employees were hourly so we were not paid for the holiday or day off. The child care owner just collected that extra money from that day off and did not have to pay anyone but herself (she was also the director).

I don't understand when people say "well you're salaried in your job and get paid for the holiday so you should pay". That would be a valid point if the employees at the center were salaried which they aren't. You're only paying the greedy owner. BTW I have no children, just a former child care worker.
11-21-2016 11:53 AM
Blackcat31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
My childs daycare provider said she was told she was not charging correct for holidays and that she needs to get paid double time for holidays that she doesn't work. I was told last minute and honestly I don't have that kind of money. Sad.
I agree with previous posters... the provider probably realized that other providers are charging more than her and she decided to do the same. Like others said, there is no rule about what or how providers charge.

But in my state, I can not make a policy change without giving families a 2 week notice of these changes so your provider "may" have had to give you advance notice but that depends on what state you are in and if your state has those types of rules/regulations.

As far as how much a provider charges and when, that is up to her. If her clients agree then its all fair and good.
11-21-2016 11:37 AM
daycarediva
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
My childs daycare provider said she was told she was not charging correct for holidays and that she needs to get paid double time for holidays that she doesn't work. I was told last minute and honestly I don't have that kind of money. Sad.
There is no regulation on charges, so I think the 'I was told I was not charging correctly...' sounds like an excuse.

I do NOT charge double time. It's standard for businesses to pay employees time and a half for working on holidays. home daycares are considered self employed, so no state labor regulations apply unless they have an employee.

Do you have a handbook? I would ask for clarification, maybe compromise and tell her that you are willing to pay for the holiday that your child isn't in attendance for, but you're not willing to pay twice the normal rate.
11-21-2016 11:27 AM
mommyneedsadayoff
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
My childs daycare provider said she was told she was not charging correct for holidays and that she needs to get paid double time for holidays that she doesn't work. I was told last minute and honestly I don't have that kind of money. Sad.
Many people get paid time and a half to work on the holidays, but I have not heard of charging 2 times the usual rate for holidays, especially when you are closed. I would ask more questions and without more information, it is hard to give you too much advice. Good luck to you though!
11-21-2016 11:24 AM
Unregistered My childs daycare provider said she was told she was not charging correct for holidays and that she needs to get paid double time for holidays that she doesn't work. I was told last minute and honestly I don't have that kind of money. Sad.
11-04-2016 09:25 AM
daycarediva
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Ok well you have a point just not too many options that accommodate the hours worked here, long days with care needed until minimum 8pm. So many provider close at 4 or 5 and so forth, nice for them but frankly I have no idea what kind of jobs their customers are working I typically haven't even gone to lunch by then.
This is old, but start your own daycare in the area that markets to this need of later hours. Sounds like the demand is there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Well, I came to this forum for ideas/advice regarding tuition guidelines. It was a simple question, IMO, and I was glad to be getting the info from providers and professionals...until I read what most of these "professionals" had to say.
I don't understand the attitude and anger towards a parent asking a simple question. Being most of us parents asking this question do not own or run a daycare why would we know all the ins and outs? And yet most of the replies here are belittling and rude. That alone would make me pull my child out of your daycare. How dare you be so nasty?! A question is asked and all that was needed was a simple explanation or breakdown, no need for sarcasm and multiple exclamation points. Don't like the career path of running a daycare? Don't like parents and their "whining"? Start a new career!
Honestly, most parents came to this particular thread to complain. My reply isn't snarky or rude. Don't sign a contract that you don't agree with. If you disagree or find it unfair that your provider has paid time off, or is paid when your child is out sick, find one that doesn't.

If you have questions about anything, ask your provider first. Most have vastly different policies and even between states licensing regulations vary quite a bit. I hope that helps (and I would be happy to answer any question I could)

For what it's worth- I love my littles, but the parents can be even more stressful than 6 kids under 5, simply because as you stated they don't understand the field because they don't work in it.
11-04-2016 04:55 AM
Unregistered Well, I came to this forum for ideas/advice regarding tuition guidelines. It was a simple question, IMO, and I was glad to be getting the info from providers and professionals...until I read what most of these "professionals" had to say.
I don't understand the attitude and anger towards a parent asking a simple question. Being most of us parents asking this question do not own or run a daycare why would we know all the ins and outs? And yet most of the replies here are belittling and rude. That alone would make me pull my child out of your daycare. How dare you be so nasty?! A question is asked and all that was needed was a simple explanation or breakdown, no need for sarcasm and multiple exclamation points. Don't like the career path of running a daycare? Don't like parents and their "whining"? Start a new career!
10-11-2016 12:43 PM
Meeko
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I haVe non problem with the daycare being closed on Holidays but it's not fair to charge a parent for a week of daycare of the child is not there aT all that week and it's not fair to assume all parents get holidaY pay! HolidaY pay is not federally mandatory and not all parents get paid for taT time off and some parents are self employed once again not getting extra paY for time off. I worked at a nursing home taT did not give is any holiday pay benefits so why should I have to pay for services I didn't receive. My child was not in daycare for two whole weeks yet in have to pay them. For what? No services were rendered during those two weeks .
You probably have a car payment. So I am going to assume that if for some reason you broke your leg and couldn't drive for 6 weeks, that you will be calling the lien holder and crying about how it's not fair you have to pay the monthly payment when you can't drive the car.......

Things happen. You still have to pay for your car.
Things happen. You still have to pay your daycare provider.
07-27-2016 09:12 AM
daycarediva
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly Songs View Post
I am moving to California tomorrow ! I get NO paid leave, NO vacation pay, NO sick pay. I get paid for hours I work, that's it. I'm a nanny and I also don't get paid if mom or dad take a day off and they don't need me. It's 100 percent my own fault. The situation will be remedied soon.
This is why providers charge for holidays/closures/sick days.

WE cannot afford to live off of an unsteady paycheck. Providers cannot afford to stay in business if suddenly Susie is home for a week because grandma is visiting, and then the power goes out so she isn't paid for anyone for 2 days, or the stomach bug hits and 3 children are out.

Parents need to go to work, and they NEED quality childcare. Please plan ahead for this expense. Children are expensive. Providers are already paid such a low wage, and then to nickel and dime them on top of it? It just shows how little parents value the love and care we give their child, and the amount of hours we work to maintain our spaces, license, programming, degrees, etc.

So many providers are former working moms. They start out thinking "I'm going to do this differently, I am not going to charge for the days the children aren't here, or holidays..." and I guarantee you nine times out of ten they suffer massive burnout, are forced to close, or change their policies.

I started out in this field working 6am-11pm. I did two shifts of children, I charged hourly. I almost lost my mind and my bills were backing up. I hated every second of childcare. I closed, regrouped and reopened with the same policies my (amazing) former provider had. I have been steady for 6 years now.
07-26-2016 11:00 PM
spedmommy4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silly Songs View Post
I am moving to California tomorrow ! I get NO paid leave, NO vacation pay, NO sick pay. I get paid for hours I work, that's it. I'm a nanny and I also don't get paid if mom or dad take a day off and they don't need me. It's 100 percent my own fault. The situation will be remedied soon.
I don't know about how the law applies to a nanny position. I do know that your employer would still be required to withhold taxes.

And, even when I only had one employee, I was still subject to the leave law. You can find more information on it here: http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/paid_sick_leave.htm
07-26-2016 08:14 PM
Blackcat31
Quote:
Originally Posted by spedmommy4 View Post
I can't find the original post that you are responding to
First page
Post #24

http://www.daycare.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3
07-26-2016 08:08 PM
Silly Songs I am moving to California tomorrow ! I get NO paid leave, NO vacation pay, NO sick pay. I get paid for hours I work, that's it. I'm a nanny and I also don't get paid if mom or dad take a day off and they don't need me. It's 100 percent my own fault. The situation will be remedied soon.
07-26-2016 06:36 PM
spedmommy4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
My Home Child Care is a Licensed Business. I have disrupted my Children's lives for the last 23 years to run it. I have laws I have to follow, my house, furnishings and yard are not "my own" to do with as I please. On my weekends, holidays and vacations, I am more likely than not, working on upkeep and changes that need to be done to satisfy my License. All the endless paperwork etc. just to do a job that most people would NEVER do. I'm "open" 11 hours a day. I get up before 4:30 and work almost straight thru till bedtime, to make sure I provide the services I am charging for. My business runs my life, not the other way around.
Besides, What part of Tuition don't you understand? I pay for College for my children. Tuition is charged for the degree, not the days actually in the classroom. My tuition charged guarantees that your child is loved, respected, protected, fed healthy foods, kept warm/cool, gets plenty of exercise, is happy and healthy when you pick him/her up and will be ready for Kindergarten when they move on.
No business can operate if their income is not steady. You want reliable Daycare? Shop around, look at their houses and ask what is offered but most importantly read contracts. If you want cheap, don't expect your child to be getting the kind of care I provide because it is just not possible.,
I can't find the original post that you are responding to but I'll add to your logical reasons. In California, as a home based provider, I employed two people. In order to retain good staff, I offered paid holidays just like the childcare centers. I couldn't reasonably pay my staff for holidays if I didn't charge parents for them.

In addition to holiday pay, California law required me to pay my employees 24 hours of sick leave each year. (Plus employee taxes and workman's comp). Home based businesses are a business just like any other.
07-26-2016 12:37 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlesReese View Post
I personally don't own a day care, nor do I ever plan on it. However,
I do understand that it is a business, but any business should know what is ethical and unethical or does anyone have a conscious these days.

After reading some of the post that had been written some time ago, I wonder how you think you should be paid for holidays and for inclement weather when you donít watch children.

My problem is this, if you watch a child then you should be paid for those services. If you donít then there should be no charge. My wife and I have to deal with her brother and his wife. They donít have a day care, but they sure do operate their home like it is. (Of course there home can be treated as such.)

Earning my Masterís and learning more and more about businesses and how they operate helps me understand what is ethical and not ethical. So again let me ask the question, why should daycareís be paid for services not rendered for bad weather, holidays, or when children can be watched by their parents?

Just saying, ďyou get paid holidays why shouldnít weĒ is not an valid argument.

Itís dishonest to charge parents when you donít watch children. I do agree that policies should be up front and in writing. But again are your policies honest? If they are, then Iím sure parents will enjoy doing business with you, if not your probably still going to have that migraine.

Companies still have to take out federal income tax, state income tax, health care fees, retirement, S.S. fees, and disability. Of course some of these are mandatory while others are voluntarily. So as a daycare are you doing all of this? Do you offer retirement for your employees, paid holidays, paid time off, and sick leave?

Again, why should parents pay a daycare for services they didnít provide?

If someone on this blog can give me an honest and valid argument then maybe you can persuade me to understand why you should be paid for services not provided?
My Home Child Care is a Licensed Business. I have disrupted my Children's lives for the last 23 years to run it. I have laws I have to follow, my house, furnishings and yard are not "my own" to do with as I please. On my weekends, holidays and vacations, I am more likely than not, working on upkeep and changes that need to be done to satisfy my License. All the endless paperwork etc. just to do a job that most people would NEVER do. I'm "open" 11 hours a day. I get up before 4:30 and work almost straight thru till bedtime, to make sure I provide the services I am charging for. My business runs my life, not the other way around.
Besides, What part of Tuition don't you understand? I pay for College for my children. Tuition is charged for the degree, not the days actually in the classroom. My tuition charged guarantees that your child is loved, respected, protected, fed healthy foods, kept warm/cool, gets plenty of exercise, is happy and healthy when you pick him/her up and will be ready for Kindergarten when they move on.
No business can operate if their income is not steady. You want reliable Daycare? Shop around, look at their houses and ask what is offered but most importantly read contracts. If you want cheap, don't expect your child to be getting the kind of care I provide because it is just not possible.,
06-08-2016 12:03 PM
Leigh At my last job outside the home, I worked about 141 days per year, and made more than most families with two wage earners make. The job before that, I had about 8 weeks of paid time off. There is a daycare provider in my town who, I swear, must have more time off than she is open. She's full, though, always. Because she's awesome, and she's probably so awesome because she's smart enough to take some downtime to recharge. This is a HARD job, and it's very emotionally and physically demanding. A provider should be expected to take plenty of time off so that he or she doesn't burn out. This is a benefit to the children, IMO. 8 weeks does seem like a lot of time off, because it's not the standard in the daycare industry, but it's still only 8 out of 52 weeks. Considering that YOUR vacation (I'm guessing you and your wife probably have 3 weeks or more), sick time (2 weeks or more), and holidays (7-15 days, depending on your employer) probably come close to that, it isn't so excessive.

As already mentioned: If you aren't comfortable with it, DON'T sign the contract and find someone else to care for your kids. No one is going to pass a law telling a business owner that they can't take vacation. No law is needed. If people don't sign on with her, she'll adjust her days off or go out of business. It's too late to complain AFTER you have AGREED to it.
06-04-2016 06:35 PM
Annalee
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
Wow thats alot of time off that YOU agreed to..

You're provider is a great business women!

If you read the whole thread you probably read the "secret" everyone seems to miss, gloss over or just plain ignore...

No one forces you (general you as a parent) to place your children in child care (in home or center) and no one forces you to sign a contract you do not agree with or cannot abide by.

There is a right fit for everyone and if you choose to enroll in a program and WILLINGLY sign a contract agreeing to the terms set forth by the provider/owner you are forfeiting your right to complain about it.
06-04-2016 02:25 PM
Thriftylady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I've read most posts here, and while an interesting debate, I just want you all to know what my children's daycare situation is.

1 person running their own daycare, they have 6 kids, all are full time (4 or 5 days a week). It's $1500 a month for 5 days, $1200 a month for 4 days.

Now here's the kicker...

These are the days off the daycare takes that we have to PAY for:
MLK - 1 day
Presidents - 1 day
Spring Break - 5 days (1 week)
Memorial Day - 1 day
Independence Day - 1 day
Summer Break - 15 days (3 weeks)
Labor Day - 1 day
Veteran's Day - 1 day
Thanksgiving - 5 days (1 week)
Winter Break - 10 days (2 weeks)

Now if you count that, it totals 41 days. 41 business days. That's OVER 8 WEEKS that daycare is closed during the year that we have to pay for. 2 MONTHS OFF, 1/6th of the year, that we are paying for without getting any service. And the worst part is this is not unusual for our area. My wife and I both work full time, and we have to trade off taking time off work to cover the days daycare is closed to watch out own kids.

So like I said, I've read most of the posts in this thread, and I agree that daycares should take holidays paid cause most others get them too. I'm all for the 10 major holidays a year, including days around Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Years (hell, take a whole week off during X-mas, that's fine), but 2 months off is a crazy hardship for parents, and there really should be some kind of law preventing daycares from charging for more then the first 2 weeks they take off.
I agree with the others. I don't take that much time off, in my area parents don't have jobs to get that much time off. It sounds like your provider may have lot of teacher parents, who get that time off. If that is the case, then she has set her hours and days off to match what most of her clients need. But you DID sign the contract. And complaining about it after you agreed to and signed it, well that isn't fair. You had one option, which was not to sign that contract. Now you have another option which is to give the notice your contract requires, and find a new provider with less days off. So see, at the end of the day you did and still do have choices.
06-04-2016 11:30 AM
mommyneedsadayoff
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I've read most posts here, and while an interesting debate, I just want you all to know what my children's daycare situation is.

1 person running their own daycare, they have 6 kids, all are full time (4 or 5 days a week). It's $1500 a month for 5 days, $1200 a month for 4 days.

Now here's the kicker...

These are the days off the daycare takes that we have to PAY for:
MLK - 1 day
Presidents - 1 day
Spring Break - 5 days (1 week)
Memorial Day - 1 day
Independence Day - 1 day
Summer Break - 15 days (3 weeks)
Labor Day - 1 day
Veteran's Day - 1 day
Thanksgiving - 5 days (1 week)
Winter Break - 10 days (2 weeks)

Now if you count that, it totals 41 days. 41 business days. That's OVER 8 WEEKS that daycare is closed during the year that we have to pay for. 2 MONTHS OFF, 1/6th of the year, that we are paying for without getting any service. And the worst part is this is not unusual for our area. My wife and I both work full time, and we have to trade off taking time off work to cover the days daycare is closed to watch out own kids.

So like I said, I've read most of the posts in this thread, and I agree that daycares should take holidays paid cause most others get them too. I'm all for the 10 major holidays a year, including days around Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Years (hell, take a whole week off during X-mas, that's fine), but 2 months off is a crazy hardship for parents, and there really should be some kind of law preventing daycares from charging for more then the first 2 weeks they take off.
Wow, thanks for your permission

If you want a law to limit time off, it would have to also include all business/jobs (including yours), not just the businesses that affect you. My husband gets 4 weeks off, so he should be capped right? My sister has been with her company over 15 years and has 10 weeks, so I guess she should give that time off back to the company she has worked her booty off for because YOU want a law. As Black cat said, YOU had a choice. Sign the contract or don't. Maybe their should be a law that parents who don't read the contract or who break the contract, should face criminal charges and jail time. I mean, when they bail on us and don't pay what they said they would pay, they are in essence, stealing from us, right? Obviously, I am kidding, but you would be amazed at the number of parents who sign contracts and the break them DAILY. Daycare is a privilege, not a right. Just because you don't like yours (even after you agreed to the terms), does not mean you have the right to make all of us change (through threat of law) to make YOU happy.
06-04-2016 08:27 AM
Blackcat31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I've read most posts here, and while an interesting debate, I just want you all to know what my children's daycare situation is.

1 person running their own daycare, they have 6 kids, all are full time (4 or 5 days a week). It's $1500 a month for 5 days, $1200 a month for 4 days.

Now here's the kicker...

These are the days off the daycare takes that we have to PAY for:
MLK - 1 day
Presidents - 1 day
Spring Break - 5 days (1 week)
Memorial Day - 1 day
Independence Day - 1 day
Summer Break - 15 days (3 weeks)
Labor Day - 1 day
Veteran's Day - 1 day
Thanksgiving - 5 days (1 week)
Winter Break - 10 days (2 weeks)

Now if you count that, it totals 41 days. 41 business days. That's OVER 8 WEEKS that daycare is closed during the year that we have to pay for. 2 MONTHS OFF, 1/6th of the year, that we are paying for without getting any service. And the worst part is this is not unusual for our area. My wife and I both work full time, and we have to trade off taking time off work to cover the days daycare is closed to watch out own kids.

So like I said, I've read most of the posts in this thread, and I agree that daycares should take holidays paid cause most others get them too. I'm all for the 10 major holidays a year, including days around Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Years (hell, take a whole week off during X-mas, that's fine), but 2 months off is a crazy hardship for parents, and there really should be some kind of law preventing daycares from charging for more then the first 2 weeks they take off.
Wow thats alot of time off that YOU agreed to..

You're provider is a great business women!

If you read the whole thread you probably read the "secret" everyone seems to miss, gloss over or just plain ignore...

No one forces you (general you as a parent) to place your children in child care (in home or center) and no one forces you to sign a contract you do not agree with or cannot abide by.

There is a right fit for everyone and if you choose to enroll in a program and WILLINGLY sign a contract agreeing to the terms set forth by the provider/owner you are forfeiting your right to complain about it.
06-04-2016 03:50 AM
Josiegirl
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I've read most posts here, and while an interesting debate, I just want you all to know what my children's daycare situation is.

1 person running their own daycare, they have 6 kids, all are full time (4 or 5 days a week). It's $1500 a month for 5 days, $1200 a month for 4 days.

Now here's the kicker...

These are the days off the daycare takes that we have to PAY for:
MLK - 1 day
Presidents - 1 day
Spring Break - 5 days (1 week)
Memorial Day - 1 day
Independence Day - 1 day
Summer Break - 15 days (3 weeks)
Labor Day - 1 day
Veteran's Day - 1 day
Thanksgiving - 5 days (1 week)
Winter Break - 10 days (2 weeks)

Now if you count that, it totals 41 days. 41 business days. That's OVER 8 WEEKS that daycare is closed during the year that we have to pay for. 2 MONTHS OFF, 1/6th of the year, that we are paying for without getting any service. And the worst part is this is not unusual for our area. My wife and I both work full time, and we have to trade off taking time off work to cover the days daycare is closed to watch out own kids.

So like I said, I've read most of the posts in this thread, and I agree that daycares should take holidays paid cause most others get them too. I'm all for the 10 major holidays a year, including days around Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Years (hell, take a whole week off during X-mas, that's fine), but 2 months off is a crazy hardship for parents, and there really should be some kind of law preventing daycares from charging for more then the first 2 weeks they take off.
I agree that much time off seems excessive. But I'll bet if you looked around, not everybody does it. Usually an area offers lots of different options for parents' needs. What about centers?
06-04-2016 12:44 AM
Unregistered I've read most posts here, and while an interesting debate, I just want you all to know what my children's daycare situation is.

1 person running their own daycare, they have 6 kids, all are full time (4 or 5 days a week). It's $1500 a month for 5 days, $1200 a month for 4 days.

Now here's the kicker...

These are the days off the daycare takes that we have to PAY for:
MLK - 1 day
Presidents - 1 day
Spring Break - 5 days (1 week)
Memorial Day - 1 day
Independence Day - 1 day
Summer Break - 15 days (3 weeks)
Labor Day - 1 day
Veteran's Day - 1 day
Thanksgiving - 5 days (1 week)
Winter Break - 10 days (2 weeks)

Now if you count that, it totals 41 days. 41 business days. That's OVER 8 WEEKS that daycare is closed during the year that we have to pay for. 2 MONTHS OFF, 1/6th of the year, that we are paying for without getting any service. And the worst part is this is not unusual for our area. My wife and I both work full time, and we have to trade off taking time off work to cover the days daycare is closed to watch out own kids.

So like I said, I've read most of the posts in this thread, and I agree that daycares should take holidays paid cause most others get them too. I'm all for the 10 major holidays a year, including days around Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Years (hell, take a whole week off during X-mas, that's fine), but 2 months off is a crazy hardship for parents, and there really should be some kind of law preventing daycares from charging for more then the first 2 weeks they take off.
05-28-2016 12:22 PM
Thriftylady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marianpy1 View Post
The answer to this question all comes down to business marketing. If you have heavy competition you must have something to be able to offer parents to draw them in. Perhaps it is no payment when daycare is closed. If you can get away with charging because of your highly rated reputation and flood of available fsmilies needing care then do so. In my business area where competition if fierce but i an a highest rated daycare in the state i have opted for no charge. I charge extremely high rates, pay 2 employees but still run a very profitable business. I treat my customers well and make them happy so i have stayed in business with no problem fir over 30 yrs. my waiting list is 2 yrs long. Its all about good business practices!!
You hit the nail on the head. We all have to decide what/how we want to do things. The market here isn't that good. So my rates are low. I do still charge regardless. Since I have a nurse in care, and am not against taking others, knowing they do have to work some holidays, I am open on holidays (except Christmas) if and ONLY if the parents are required to work. And they pay an extra fee for that. I got Monday off because nurse wanted to work but when I reminded her of the extra fee, she suddenly didn't need to. And that fee is way to low, only an extra $10 per day per child. I am going to be raising it this fall. But, they have a choice give the the paid day off on their normally slightly above market rate for my area, OR pay extra for holiday care. I will NOT work on Christmas, children should be with family then. My family will not celebrate that and leave the kids high and dry.
05-28-2016 06:47 AM
Marianpy1 The answer to this question all comes down to business marketing. If you have heavy competition you must have something to be able to offer parents to draw them in. Perhaps it is no payment when daycare is closed. If you can get away with charging because of your highly rated reputation and flood of available fsmilies needing care then do so. In my business area where competition if fierce but i an a highest rated daycare in the state i have opted for no charge. I charge extremely high rates, pay 2 employees but still run a very profitable business. I treat my customers well and make them happy so i have stayed in business with no problem fir over 30 yrs. my waiting list is 2 yrs long. Its all about good business practices!!
12-22-2015 03:48 PM
MissAnn One more thing. If I chose not to charge for holidays or vacations you better bet that my weekly fee would go up! Either way we need to make a living just like anybody else. And believe me with all of the experience I have I do not make a killing at this! If you are pleased with your providers care then I think you should let her know that you appreciate her.
12-22-2015 03:35 PM
MissAnn
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I haVe non problem with the daycare being closed on Holidays but it's not fair to charge a parent for a week of daycare of the child is not there aT all that week and it's not fair to assume all parents get holidaY pay! HolidaY pay is not federally mandatory and not all parents get paid for taT time off and some parents are self employed once again not getting extra paY for time off. I worked at a nursing home taT did not give is any holiday pay benefits so why should I have to pay for services I didn't receive. My child was not in daycare for two whole weeks yet in have to pay them. For what? No services were rendered during those two weeks .
I own my own business. I have a degree in early childhood education along with over 20 years experience. I keep my rates low all year long and yes I do get holiday pay as well as vacation pay.

The fact that you do not have holiday pay patient has nothing to do with me or my contract. If paying my vacation or holiday pay is a dealbreaker then it's best that you find another provider.

I hope that eventually you will also had vacation and holiday pay. I worked years without it.
12-22-2015 12:35 PM
Blackcat31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I haVe non problem with the daycare being closed on Holidays but it's not fair to charge a parent for a week of daycare of the child is not there aT all that week and it's not fair to assume all parents get holidaY pay! HolidaY pay is not federally mandatory and not all parents get paid for taT time off and some parents are self employed once again not getting extra paY for time off. I worked at a nursing home taT did not give is any holiday pay benefits so why should I have to pay for services I didn't receive. My child was not in daycare for two whole weeks yet in have to pay them. For what? No services were rendered during those two weeks .
I don't care if my clients get paid time off or not.
It has nothing to do with me.

My only concern is that those clients that do CHOOSE my program understand that I charge based on enrollment NOT on attendance or time used.

If prospective clients don't like my rules/policies regarding paying for certain days, then don't sign on with me and find a provider that doesn't charge that way.

Seems like a pretty simple solution to me.

You had a choice in regards to whether you agreed to your providers terms.

If you signed on with her/him then you agreed to pay those days and don't get to whine about it.
12-22-2015 11:46 AM
Thriftylady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I haVe non problem with the daycare being closed on Holidays but it's not fair to charge a parent for a week of daycare of the child is not there aT all that week and it's not fair to assume all parents get holidaY pay! HolidaY pay is not federally mandatory and not all parents get paid for taT time off and some parents are self employed once again not getting extra paY for time off. I worked at a nursing home taT did not give is any holiday pay benefits so why should I have to pay for services I didn't receive. My child was not in daycare for two whole weeks yet in have to pay them. For what? No services were rendered during those two weeks .
I am open this week. One of my families has a parent off work all week and decided not to come. Their choice but my contract state pay is regardless of attendance. They can either pay me and continue on or pay me and give their two weeks notice, but bottom line they signed the contract. I am closed on Christmas, and I do get paid for that day. No holiday pay is not federally mandated, but the feds don't make my policies either.
12-22-2015 11:41 AM
Unregistered I haVe non problem with the daycare being closed on Holidays but it's not fair to charge a parent for a week of daycare of the child is not there aT all that week and it's not fair to assume all parents get holidaY pay! HolidaY pay is not federally mandatory and not all parents get paid for taT time off and some parents are self employed once again not getting extra paY for time off. I worked at a nursing home taT did not give is any holiday pay benefits so why should I have to pay for services I didn't receive. My child was not in daycare for two whole weeks yet in have to pay them. For what? No services were rendered during those two weeks .
11-17-2015 02:21 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Originally Posted by Unregistered
Exactly my thoughts *Interested*
"Sometimes I think parents whine more than children. You are paying for the slot, not for the hour. If you want it spelled out.... you have a yearly flat rate. It is broken down for your convenience. Or would you rather pay by the year?? The only thing to change this is what the policy makes exceptions to. Have you ever heard of salary pay? No matter how many hours you work, it is a flat pay. It is the same principle. Got a problem? Start your own day care and see what we are talking about, then maybe you would understand better. If we catered to everyones whims, we would watch your precious for free 24/7. "

My, you sound like a provider who really doesn't like parents or children... Maybe time to find a new profession? I am a healthcare professional and think it is completely fair to provide my childcare provider for the same paid holidays that most other professionals receive.. These would be Christmas, Thanksgiving, etc.. But, we had one who wanted paid time off for every school vacation day, including the 2 weeks off at Christmas paid! This is an extreme hardship on parents who must pay "double" and find someone else to cover those days. Many of these parents aren't lucky enough to be getting ANY paid holidays of their own... Of the ones who are, only parents who happen to be school teachers are getting as many paid holidays as this childcare provider. (We found someone new). If this woman wants so many paid holidays she should go back to college and get a teaching degree.
"Amen"
11-02-2015 10:17 AM
Leigh
Quote:
Originally Posted by nannyde View Post
Not like Kmart closing. More like... when you go to a hotel and rent a room you don't complain to your landlord you had to pay for two places to live those days.

When you go to work during the day you don't complain to your cable and internet company that no ones home to use it so you don't want to pay for those hours.
That's exactly the best way to put it. I, along with many other providers, charge a yearly rate. Clients get the choice to pay it weekly, every 2 weeks, monthly, quarterly, or yearly. Most all of mine pay weekly or every other, one does pay quarterly (in advance). When I figure my rates, I figure what I have to have to stay in business per child, per year. That doesn't change because a client has a job where they have to work a holiday. It's on the client to either schedule their own vacation for my days off (which is what I did when I was a parent using daycare) or for the parent to find alternate care. It's absolutely no more unfair for my business to get my yearly rate than it is for a landlord or cable company to get their monthly rate. The only difference is that MY profit margins are MUCH MUCH smaller than Comcast's or your landlord's.
11-01-2015 04:08 PM
daycarediva
Quote:
Originally Posted by nannyde View Post
It's not access. It's agreement.

You made an agreement with your cable company that you would pay a flat fee regardless of use. You made an agreement with your landlord that if you were going to rent the place you paid whether you were there or not. If you are hospitalized and are gone for a month... you pay.

If your power goes out and you can't run your tv... you still pay the cable company.


If you want a pay as you go daycare, get one. Tons of newbies have that deal. A smattering of experienced providers have it. Find that provider. Don't enter an agreement where you pay and can't use the service if you don't agree.

Agreeing to it and believing it's unfair is what is unfair.
This is what annoys providers about having to rehash this conversation. If you don't agree with a provider's policy- don't sign on with them. It really IS that simple. No irate parents, no annoyed daycare providers. There are a million ways to operate in this business. Find one that works for you.
11-01-2015 03:33 PM
Josiegirl I used to work at the hospital, a place where everyone took shorter shifts on every holiday, had to work 2 weekends then off the 3rd. That was before I had kids. I made the choice to switch jobs after I started a family so that I wouldn't have to work those days. If it's something you truly want to change you can find a way.

Another thought is are there friends or family in the picture who can take turns helping out?

I never used to believe in taking paid holidays off as a provider, I accepted it as one of the downsides of the business. It took me a lot of years(about 25 or so) plus quite a few daycare business trainings to finally tell myself I deserved paid holidays too. I needed them! That's when I rewrote my policies to include payment was due 52 weeks a year regardless of attendance. And I believe that's becoming more the norm now.
11-01-2015 01:51 PM
nannyde
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I am not being denied access to those places or services though, the landlord doesn't lock me out when I go to a hotel. The cable company doesn't turn off services when I'm normally scheduled to work and force me to purchase satellite TV or Netflix if I call in sick and want to watch TV when I normally don't.


Some of you seem really upset, maybe instead to of demanding an end to the discussion in CAPS, move on to a topic you enjoy more? We're just talking, no one is trying to hurt your feelings.
The simplest solution is to pay a higher weekly rate each week to cover the vacation/holiday slots so you are paid up by the time the day or week comes up. I have offered to every parent to pay an additional 15 percent per week up front and I won't charge for my days off. That way, I get the money upfront if you decide to book before I take the time off.

Haven't had any takers on that. Lots of daycare providers build their days off into their weekly fee and just set aside the money and pull it out as they take time off. That way the parent pays upfront but has the money to pay one other person on the times off.

Maybe look for that.
11-01-2015 01:46 PM
MarinaVanessa
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I am not being denied access to those places or services though
If you sign up for a gym membership and the gym closes for a holiday you don't get prorated for the holidays that they are closed and they do deny you access into their building. Same goes with Costco/Sam's clubs etc where you pay a yearly membership to be able to shop there, if they close for a holiday you don't get prorated and can't shop there on those days.
11-01-2015 01:46 PM
Thriftylady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I am not being denied access to those places or services though, the landlord doesn't lock me out when I go to a hotel. The cable company doesn't turn off services when I'm normally scheduled to work and force me to purchase satellite TV or Netflix if I call in sick and want to watch TV when I normally don't.


Some of you seem really upset, maybe instead to of demanding an end to the discussion in CAPS, move on to a topic you enjoy more? We're just talking, no one is trying to hurt your feelings.
The thing is no matter what is is always about choices. Every provider has choices, as does every parent. I am a provider that does do the "odd" hours that many others don't. So it is possible to find one who does. I also had a mom ask me to provide care on Thanksgiving. She is a nurse and has to work. And I told her if she really needs me I will, but she will be paying extra for that service. Even lower level jobs pay more for working a holiday, and so she can afford to pay a little more for holiday care. And if she didn't have to work, there is no way in heck I would do it. I can see where if more providers did holidays, parents would just take the kids because the daycare was open and sadly many parents just don't seem to want to be with their kids.
11-01-2015 01:41 PM
nannyde
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I am not being denied access to those places or services though, the landlord doesn't lock me out when I go to a hotel. The cable company doesn't turn off services when I'm normally scheduled to work and force me to purchase satellite TV or Netflix if I call in sick and want to watch TV when I normally don't.


Some of you seem really upset, maybe instead to of demanding an end to the discussion in CAPS, move on to a topic you enjoy more? We're just talking, no one is trying to hurt your feelings.
It's not access. It's agreement.

You made an agreement with your cable company that you would pay a flat fee regardless of use. You made an agreement with your landlord that if you were going to rent the place you paid whether you were there or not. If you are hospitalized and are gone for a month... you pay.

If your power goes out and you can't run your tv... you still pay the cable company.


If you want a pay as you go daycare, get one. Tons of newbies have that deal. A smattering of experienced providers have it. Find that provider. Don't enter an agreement where you pay and can't use the service if you don't agree.

Agreeing to it and believing it's unfair is what is unfair.
11-01-2015 01:33 PM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by nannyde View Post
Not like Kmart closing. More like... when you go to a hotel and rent a room you don't complain to your landlord you had to pay for two places to live those days.

When you go to work during the day you don't complain to your cable and internet company that no ones home to use it so you don't want to pay for those hours.
I am not being denied access to those places or services though, the landlord doesn't lock me out when I go to a hotel. The cable company doesn't turn off services when I'm normally scheduled to work and force me to purchase satellite TV or Netflix if I call in sick and want to watch TV when I normally don't.


Some of you seem really upset, maybe instead to of demanding an end to the discussion in CAPS, move on to a topic you enjoy more? We're just talking, no one is trying to hurt your feelings.
11-01-2015 12:23 PM
Meeko
Quote:
Originally Posted by nannyde View Post
Not like Kmart closing. More like... when you go to a hotel and rent a room you don't complain to your landlord you had to pay for two places to live those days.

When you go to work during the day you don't complain to your cable and internet company that no ones home to use it so you don't want to pay for those hours.
11-01-2015 11:31 AM
daycarediva *insert picture of beating a dead horse here*

If you have a problem with your childcare closing for holidays, or charging for closing for holidays. FIND ALTERNATE CHILD CARE.

Period, end of discussion. Wish you the best, yadda yadda.
11-01-2015 10:39 AM
nannyde
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I'm not complaining that they're closed I'm complaining that the closure means parents pay double for that day. It's not like Kmart closing or whatever, I can just wait on shopping there, maybe you see now
Not like Kmart closing. More like... when you go to a hotel and rent a room you don't complain to your landlord you had to pay for two places to live those days.

When you go to work during the day you don't complain to your cable and internet company that no ones home to use it so you don't want to pay for those hours.
11-01-2015 09:47 AM
Play Care
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Ok well you have a point just not too many options that accommodate the hours worked here, long days with care needed until minimum 8pm. So many provider close at 4 or 5 and so forth, nice for them but frankly I have no idea what kind of jobs their customers are working I typically haven't even gone to lunch by then.
But, those are in home providers. As an in home provider I market to teachers, higher level white collar employees (those with shorter work days, flex time, work from home arrangements) etc. After having a couple of clients sign on with me knowing my hours but then complaining about it after that fact, I no longer accept clients whose work schedules don't mesh with what I am able to offer.

Day care centers typically offer hours until 6 or 7 at night. I've never heard of any center closing before 6.

Based on what you've written you already know that in home day cares are not an option for you with your current job. Time to start center shopping.
11-01-2015 09:17 AM
MarinaVanessa
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Ok well you have a point just not too many options that accommodate the hours worked here, long days with care needed until minimum 8pm. So many provider close at 4 or 5 and so forth, nice for them but frankly I have no idea what kind of jobs their customers are working I typically haven't even gone to lunch by then.
Again however, working at this job is a choice you have made. I used to be there too. I worked retail or restaurant jobs where I wasn't off until midnight on some nights, since I was the parent it was my responsibility to find child care for my child. I didn't and couldn't afford to pay a flat fee per week on my salary and hours so I found a daycare that would allow me to pay only for the hours that I actually used. It was also my responsibility to find child care for my child after my daycare closed. I;m the parent, these are my responsibilities and my choices.

After a while I got tired of working the hours that I was working so I got a different job in an office that was 9-5 mon-fri. Most daycares are open until 6pm so if fit better and I still paid for daycare on days that the daycare was closed for holidays, I budgeted for these days. Then later when I wanted to add to my family I made the decision to change my career and go into daycare to be able to stay home with my kids while still bringing home an income. So you see, choices are ours to make and there are always options. There are always different child care options with different policies and different structures, all parents have to do is make a list of what they need, what they wish they could get and start calling around. If you don't like your options, change them.
11-01-2015 08:06 AM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by nannyde View Post

Don't stomp your feet and complain that a business you need on Holidays isn't open. Look at all the workers and say to yourself... I'm going after THAT job so I can have the days off paid.
I'm not complaining that they're closed I'm complaining that the closure means parents pay double for that day. It's not like Kmart closing or whatever, I can just wait on shopping there, maybe you see now
11-01-2015 08:02 AM
Unregistered
Quote:
Originally Posted by Play Care View Post
Life is unfair.
Most adults realize this. It's pretty clear when a baseball or football players make *millions* for tossing a ball around and our military and First Responders make peanuts. Or how CEO's make billions and their employees are on food stamps (I'm looking at you, Walmart) So yeah, life is unfair.

That said, when I was working in a job that was highly family unfriendly, I put in notice and found other employment that worked better for my family. I didn't blame anyone else. I didn't cry about life being unfair. I took personal responsibility for my situation and made the necessary changes.

If you can't find other employment (or don't want to) there must be day care centers that are open most days of the year. Here the centers only take major holidays, which would leave 5 days out of the entire year you would have to make other arrangements.


Let this be the year we problem SOLVE instead of complaining.
Ok well you have a point just not too many options that accommodate the hours worked here, long days with care needed until minimum 8pm. So many provider close at 4 or 5 and so forth, nice for them but frankly I have no idea what kind of jobs their customers are working I typically haven't even gone to lunch by then.
11-01-2015 06:32 AM
nannyde
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
It just seems really unfair, where I work we OPEN every day except Christmas, then daycare close so not only is the parent working, they pay for the daycare to close AND for additional childcare, how is that fair??? And yes we ALL know you are "business owners" no need to come rushing in to deliver that lecture, folks!!!
What's unfair about a worker like you having to work on holidays and a worker like me who can command a salary that includes paid holidays? If you want to command or score a job where part of the benefit package includes paid holidays then get to getting the education, experience, and create the demand for your work that compensates you with paid holidays.

It aint free. I've been working since I'm 14 and have over three decades in my field. I went to college for a degree and license that enables me to ask for and receive holiday benefits. I haven't worked a job since college that didn't pay me to be off or offer me time and a half for working the day if I so choose.


You want that? Then go get it.

Don't stomp your feet and complain that a business you need on Holidays isn't open. Look at all the workers and say to yourself... I'm going after THAT job so I can have the days off paid.
11-01-2015 05:18 AM
Play Care
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
It just seems really unfair, where I work we OPEN every day except Christmas, then daycare close so not only is the parent working, they pay for the daycare to close AND for additional childcare, how is that fair??? And yes we ALL know you are "business owners" no need to come rushing in to deliver that lecture, folks!!!
Life is unfair.
Most adults realize this. It's pretty clear when a baseball or football players make *millions* for tossing a ball around and our military and First Responders make peanuts. Or how CEO's make billions and their employees are on food stamps (I'm looking at you, Walmart) So yeah, life is unfair.

That said, when I was working in a job that was highly family unfriendly, I put in notice and found other employment that worked better for my family. I didn't blame anyone else. I didn't cry about life being unfair. I took personal responsibility for my situation and made the necessary changes.

If you can't find other employment (or don't want to) there must be day care centers that are open most days of the year. Here the centers only take major holidays, which would leave 5 days out of the entire year you would have to make other arrangements.
For those few days you could always split your paid personal days with your spouse, so then you're down to 2 days out of the year you personally need to take off. Or maybe Grandma or Grandpa is retired and would like to spend the day with the grandchild, etc.

Let this be the year we problem SOLVE instead of complaining.
11-01-2015 02:09 AM
Unregistered It just seems really unfair, where I work we OPEN every day except Christmas, then daycare close so not only is the parent working, they pay for the daycare to close AND for additional childcare, how is that fair??? And yes we ALL know you are "business owners" no need to come rushing in to deliver that lecture, folks!!!
10-13-2015 07:45 AM
Blackcat31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
My question: my daycare provider added holidays to our original contract and now charges a higher amount then what we would normally pay. My child only uses afterschool care and on days when she has a holiday we are charged $10 more then our normal rate. This really upsets me. This is not part of the original contract and I understand things change occur and I have rolled with the punches, but to charge MORE on holidays is ridiculous right? I get paid holidays but I don't get holiday bonuses for not working.
Have you asked your provider to explain the change?

If not, I would right away since the holiday season is approaching quickly.

If you have and she explained it clearly then you have two choices at that moment. Resign a new contract agreeing to the change or withdraw and find other care arrangements.

fwiw~ I don't agree with what your provider is doing but since the law says that a self-employed business owner can set their own policies, she is not doing anything illegal so the choice to accept it or to not accept it and move on is strictly up to you.
10-13-2015 07:27 AM
Unregistered My question: my daycare provider added holidays to our original contract and now charges a higher amount then what we would normally pay. My child only uses afterschool care and on days when she has a holiday we are charged $10 more then our normal rate. This really upsets me. This is not part of the original contract and I understand things change occur and I have rolled with the punches, but to charge MORE on holidays is ridiculous right? I get paid holidays but I don't get holiday bonuses for not working.
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