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-   -   A Good Article Comparing Montessori and Waldorf (https://www.daycare.com/forum/showthread.php?t=65918)

Heidi 10-15-2013 08:14 AM

A Good Article Comparing Montessori and Waldorf
 
http://www.whywaldorfworks.org/02_W_...Montessori.pdf

Lyss 10-15-2013 07:51 PM

Thanks for sharing :)

Laurel 10-16-2013 04:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Heidi (Post 399085)

I know nothing about Waldorf but I have worked in a Montessori preschool for several years.

I don't agree that the children all work alone on their own and emphasis is not on socializing. Our rules were that a child pick their work and do it on their own mat/table. However if another child comes over and wants to join that child then they must ask and if the child with the work says it is okay then they do it together. If the child says "no thank you" or "not now" then that is respected. I always likened it to an office setting. If you are working and do not want to be disturbed that is okay and if not that is okay too.

There is another part I don't agree with but no time now.

Also, I can't get a real sense of what Waldorf is from this article so had a hard time comparing its aspects to Montessori. I guess I'll have to look it up.

Laurel

Heidi 10-16-2013 05:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Laurel (Post 399502)
I know nothing about Waldorf but I have worked in a Montessori preschool for several years.

I don't agree that the children all work alone on their own and emphasis is not on socializing. Our rules were that a child pick their work and do it on their own mat/table. However if another child comes over and wants to join that child then they must ask and if the child with the work says it is okay then they do it together. If the child says "no thank you" or "not now" then that is respected. I always likened it to an office setting. If you are working and do not want to be disturbed that is okay and if not that is okay too.

There is another part I don't agree with but no time now.

Also, I can't get a real sense of what Waldorf is from this article so had a hard time comparing its aspects to Montessori. I guess I'll have to look it up.

Laurel

I did see in the beginning that she said that all Montessori's may be a little different. I know in my sons' Montessori years ago, they could work in pairs, too.

Willow 10-16-2013 09:13 AM

I didn't realize how much I pulled from both until they were compared side by side like that likethis

Blackcat31 10-16-2013 09:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Willow (Post 399616)
I didn't realize how much I pulled from both until they were compared side by side like that likethis

Now add the Reggio aspects and you probably utilize all 3 more than you realize. ;)

I think a majority of early childhood approaches are similar but either applied a bit differently or interpreted differently.

The commonalities are greater than their differences. likethis

Willow 10-16-2013 09:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blackcat31 (Post 399620)
Now add the Reggio aspects and you probably utilize all 3 more than you realize. ;)

I think a majority of early childhood approaches are similar but either applied a bit differently or interpreted differently.

The commonalities are greater than their differences. likethis

How true is that lol

I could always start a new one with my hodge podge and see how far it gets :D

JoseyJo 10-27-2013 10:51 AM

Thank you for this great link! I read it through and searched for more articles comparing the two.

I have found that we are definitely not Montessori, but have a good mix of Reggio and Waldorf aspects in our curriculum. I had in my mind that Montessori was something completely different than it is so now if a parent interviewing mentions they want/like the Montessori method I know that isn't going to be a good fit :)


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