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  #1  
Old 02-20-2018, 03:06 PM
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Pandaluver21 Pandaluver21 is online now
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Question Red Flags?

Hello,
I just got an inquiry about an opening. I asked her if she had any questions and she wrote me back.

1st question- Could I extend pickup time 15minutes
Following questions- Are we "certified", How long have we been working with kids, has there been any reports against us (said she was going to look anyway, just wanted to see what I'd say...)
She then asked a couple other questions that I have no idea what they were because of typos.
She said this was going to be hard for her because she's used to watching her daughter "all day everyday"

Do any of these seem like red flags to you?
First off, asking us to change hour hours right off the bat seems weird. I've done this job too long without a backbone and it seems like I'm asking for trouble to take someone that wants times changed right away. (also, we are a preschool not a daycare) Many of the questions she asked are on our website, so I assume she didn't actually look at it. And the "I'm going to look anyway" almost seems like she's trying to catch me in a lie? Trust me, nothing to lie about here!
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  #2  
Old 02-20-2018, 03:08 PM
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Michael Michael is online now
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Trust your gut instincts.

Here are some other threads on Red Flags: https://www.daycare.com/forum/tags.php?tag=red+flags
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  #3  
Old 02-20-2018, 03:18 PM
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One word...............RUN!!!!
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Old 02-20-2018, 03:29 PM
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I would say no way. Sounds like trouble waiting to happen to me.
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  #5  
Old 02-20-2018, 03:33 PM
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Blackcat31 Blackcat31 is offline
 
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The second a parent asks you to bend, break of waive a policy just for them, I stop.

Nope, just nope.

It bothers me that parents feel comfortable asking a complete stranger to basically do a "favor" for them before even considering to ask a friend/family member or neighbor first.
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  #6  
Old 02-20-2018, 04:06 PM
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Yay I'm not crazy!
I am going to write her back, see if I can get a better view of things?
Now to figure out what to write her...
Should I address each question? Should I send my handbook and leave it at that?
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  #7  
Old 02-22-2018, 06:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pandaluver21 View Post
Hello,
I just got an inquiry about an opening. I asked her if she had any questions and she wrote me back.

1st question- Could I extend pickup time 15minutes
Following questions- Are we "certified", How long have we been working with kids, has there been any reports against us (said she was going to look anyway, just wanted to see what I'd say...)
She then asked a couple other questions that I have no idea what they were because of typos.
She said this was going to be hard for her because she's used to watching her daughter "all day everyday"

Do any of these seem like red flags to you?
First off, asking us to change hour hours right off the bat seems weird. I've done this job too long without a backbone and it seems like I'm asking for trouble to take someone that wants times changed right away. (also, we are a preschool not a daycare) Many of the questions she asked are on our website, so I assume she didn't actually look at it. And the "I'm going to look anyway" almost seems like she's trying to catch me in a lie? Trust me, nothing to lie about here!
The asking if you could extend pickup time really doesn't bother me, but the highlighted part where she asks you a question and says she's going to look anyway, but wanted to see what you'd say is insulting. Why doesn't she come out and say that she wants to see if you'd lie to her. That part sticks in my craw.


I hope you feel better fast!!!
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  #8  
Old 02-27-2018, 05:53 PM
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Pandaluver21 Pandaluver21 is online now
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Well, the good news is I am feeling much better!

The bad news is, I gave her the benefit of the doubt, set up a walk-through, and she was a no show

Oh well, moving on...
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  #9  
Old 02-27-2018, 07:15 PM
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Blackcat31 Blackcat31 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pandaluver21 View Post
Well, the good news is I am feeling much better!

The bad news is, I gave her the benefit of the doubt, set up a walk-through, and she was a no show

Oh well, moving on...
Sorry...

Someday she might feel bad for being so flakey ....

But I donít think anyone should ever feel bad for giving someone a chance!

Glad to hear youíre feeling better too!
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  #10  
Old 02-28-2018, 10:14 AM
Liz Downs Liz Downs is offline
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Default Red flag

Hi everyone just throwing my 2 cents in here:
When a potential client is interviewing you for a child care spot you, as a provider, should also be conducting your own interview to see if the child and the family is a good fit for your program. This is a two-way relationship! If your gut instincts tell you that something is not right follow these instincts.
The area where you need to be concerned is how you decline the opening to the prospective parent. You can spend all kinds of time and energy handing out your policies, procedures and parent handbook, and having walk-throughs. But, the bottom line is you instinctually "know" that this is a bad fit right from the initial contact.
So, tell the prospect (*at the initial point of contact) that there have been other parents looking to place their child in your program and that you do not yet know the outcome and that you will get back in touch with them once you know more. At a later point in time contact the parent and tell them that the opening has been filled and that you are sorry.
If you get into discussing ANY "whys" you feel that it is not a good fit you will likely run into the parent concluding that you were somehow discriminatory against her/her child. Now you have a potential discrimination charge to answer to. GREAT! On top of everything else you have to deal with, you definitely do not want additional stress.
Never, ever get into "why" the prospect is not a good fit. You just no longer have the opening. Save yourself time, energy, money and a potential discrimination lawsuit and move on!
Hope this helps you and other providers. Always remember that you have as much right to data gather as the potential client. Make informed decisions up front. It is easier to get into a relationship than to leave one!
Liz Downs

Last edited by Blackcat31; 02-28-2018 at 10:56 AM. Reason: Removed advertising statement
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  #11  
Old 02-28-2018, 11:02 AM
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Blackcat31 Blackcat31 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liz Downs View Post
Hi everyone just throwing my 2 cents in here:
When a potential client is interviewing you for a child care spot you, as a provider, should also be conducting your own interview to see if the child and the family is a good fit for your program. This is a two-way relationship! If your gut instincts tell you that something is not right follow these instincts.
The area where you need to be concerned is how you decline the opening to the prospective parent. You can spend all kinds of time and energy handing out your policies, procedures and parent handbook, and having walk-throughs. But, the bottom line is you instinctually "know" that this is a bad fit right from the initial contact.
So, tell the prospect (*at the initial point of contact) that there have been other parents looking to place their child in your program and that you do not yet know the outcome and that you will get back in touch with them once you know more. At a later point in time contact the parent and tell them that the opening has been filled and that you are sorry.
If you get into discussing ANY "whys" you feel that it is not a good fit you will likely run into the parent concluding that you were somehow discriminatory against her/her child. Now you have a potential discrimination charge to answer to. GREAT! On top of everything else you have to deal with, you definitely do not want additional stress.
Never, ever get into "why" the prospect is not a good fit. You just no longer have the opening. Save yourself time, energy, money and a potential discrimination lawsuit and move on!
Hope this helps you and other providers. Always remember that you have as much right to data gather as the potential client. Make informed decisions up front. It is easier to get into a relationship than to leave one!
Liz Downs
This is so not true and is very mis-leading.

It is illegal to discriminate against children or parents because of race, color, gender, religion, age, disability, or national origin. Protected class as defined by the ADA also fall under discrimination but declining a family due to a provider not feeling as if they are a good fit for their program is NOT discrimination.

Here is an article that explains it well.
http://tomcopelandblog.com/illegal-d...nate-parents-2

Last edited by Blackcat31; 02-28-2018 at 11:05 AM.
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  #12  
Old 03-15-2018, 03:21 PM
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Pandaluver21 Pandaluver21 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Liz Downs View Post
Hi everyone just throwing my 2 cents in here:
When a potential client is interviewing you for a child care spot you, as a provider, should also be conducting your own interview to see if the child and the family is a good fit for your program. This is a two-way relationship! If your gut instincts tell you that something is not right follow these instincts.
The area where you need to be concerned is how you decline the opening to the prospective parent. You can spend all kinds of time and energy handing out your policies, procedures and parent handbook, and having walk-throughs. But, the bottom line is you instinctually "know" that this is a bad fit right from the initial contact.
So, tell the prospect (*at the initial point of contact) that there have been other parents looking to place their child in your program and that you do not yet know the outcome and that you will get back in touch with them once you know more. At a later point in time contact the parent and tell them that the opening has been filled and that you are sorry.
If you get into discussing ANY "whys" you feel that it is not a good fit you will likely run into the parent concluding that you were somehow discriminatory against her/her child. Now you have a potential discrimination charge to answer to. GREAT! On top of everything else you have to deal with, you definitely do not want additional stress.
Never, ever get into "why" the prospect is not a good fit. You just no longer have the opening. Save yourself time, energy, money and a potential discrimination lawsuit and move on!
Hope this helps you and other providers. Always remember that you have as much right to data gather as the potential client. Make informed decisions up front. It is easier to get into a relationship than to leave one!
Liz Downs
To say I no longer have the opening would be a lie, I will not do that.
I have no problem explaining "why" in the simplest of terms.
I set up a walk-through with this family. They didn't show up, messaged later and said that they thought it was the following day. I again (against my better judgement) told her we could try again the following week. Guess who didn't show up. Trust me, there was no "discrimination" going on. I would have to know something about the person to discriminate against them anyway...
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