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Old 05-08-2013, 05:52 AM
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Default Celiacs Disease

I have a family that is interested in starting with me in June. The 2 children ages 2 and 4 both have celiacs disease.

I am NOT at all familiar with it and was wondering if anyone could fill me in.

I am trying to decide if it is going to be tough to manage/deal with or something that is not a big deal.

I AM on the food program but family has offered to provide meals.

I would just like to be able to have enough information to make an educated decision on whether or not this is something I can and am willing to do.

Thanks ladies!
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Old 05-08-2013, 06:16 AM
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It is a lot of work if it is a true celiac. They can't tolerate any gluten as it causes intestinal distress. This means you need spotless cutting boards etc. no cross contamination.


Some people throw the word celiac around loosely because gluten free is trendy right now but a true celiac will be very sick with contact - even possibly just skin contact.
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Old 05-08-2013, 06:22 AM
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Originally Posted by canadiancare View Post
It is a lot of work if it is a true celiac. They can't tolerate any gluten as it causes intestinal distress. This means you need spotless cutting boards etc. no cross contamination.


Some people throw the word celiac around loosely because gluten free is trendy right now but a true celiac will be very sick with contact - even possibly just skin contact.
So far, I have just spoken on the phone with the parent and have been told that it isn't serious, just a "little tummy issue" ~ were the words used by the parent.

Is there anything specific I should ask them?

Like I said, they are willing to provide meals.

They are a family from my waitlist and although the hours are good and will fit in with what I have going on this summer, I just want to make sure I have all the info I need before I agree or disagree.

Years ago, I wouldn't have considered a family that had any type of dietary need that differed from what I considered "normal" eating but the more I read and learn about diet now days has me really rethinking a lot of things.

Because of that, I am more willing to be accepting of different dietary needs IF it is something I can manage without jeopardizing the care of others or my sanity.
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Old 05-08-2013, 06:25 AM
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http://www.celiac.ca/index.php/about...contamination/

This is a list of how to keep your kitchen for a celiac.

The disease causes malabsorption issues of nutrients so it is essential to keep it in check.
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Old 05-08-2013, 06:46 AM
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If the parents were willing to supply all food I'd certainly consider it.

The only thing I'd be really concerned with is there being hurt feelings if meals and snacks don't match up. I could see that turning into a big "Well why does Janie get that and I don't! Not fair!" coming from both sides of the fence every single meal and snack you know?

I agree with canadiancare that it's become super trendy now to go gluten free and declare a little indigestion as Celiacs. If the parents themselves have declared it's just a little tummy issue I doubt they're truly afflicted, so at least in that regard you wouldn't have to use near the caution as you would as if they were officially diagnosed and actually suffering from it.
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Old 05-08-2013, 06:50 AM
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There are 3 actual conditions. Celiac which is a genetic auto immune disease, gluten intolerance which is similar to lactose intolerance and wheat allergy which is rare and like a peanut allergy potentially deadly.
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Old 05-08-2013, 06:53 AM
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We have a child whom I suspect has celiac, but is under 1 and too young to test.

Like PPs have said, true celiac is hard to manage because even the crumbs of food containing gluten can be dangerous.

If it is just a little tummy issue, and is more of a gluten sensitivity - I don't think it will be too hard to manage. Especially if parents are providing meals. Until our current DCB needed to avoid gluten - I didn't realize how many of our meals contain gluten.
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Old 05-08-2013, 06:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
I have a family that is interested in starting with me in June. The 2 children ages 2 and 4 both have celiacs disease.

I am NOT at all familiar with it and was wondering if anyone could fill me in.

I am trying to decide if it is going to be tough to manage/deal with or something that is not a big deal.

I AM on the food program but family has offered to provide meals.

I would just like to be able to have enough information to make an educated decision on whether or not this is something I can and am willing to do.

Thanks ladies!
My daughter is has Celiac disease. At it's worst she was having such severe tummy issues she couldn't walk and once she was screaming and we rushed her to the ER. She was off everything for a few months which rebooted her system and gave her time to heal. Now she can tolerate little amounts like wheat in a sauce or using the same cutting board for breads and even occasionally pasta but she's old enough to know not to overdue it.

I would have no issue taking on celiac children especially ones coming to care with their own food. If treats are an issue mom could just give you some gluten free cupcakes to freeze and you could bring them out on the treat days.
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Old 05-08-2013, 06:58 AM
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Originally Posted by Willow View Post
If the parents were willing to supply all food I'd certainly consider it.

The only thing I'd be really concerned with is there being hurt feelings if meals and snacks don't match up. I could see that turning into a big "Well why does Janie get that and I don't! Not fair!" coming from both sides of the fence every single meal and snack you know?

I agree with canadiancare that it's become super trendy now to go gluten free and declare a little indigestion as Celiacs. If the parents themselves have declared it's just a little tummy issue I doubt they're truly afflicted, so at least in that regard you wouldn't have to use near the caution as you would as if they were officially diagnosed and actually suffering from it.
I already have one family that completely supplies meals for their child as the child is 100% dairy free.

The issue of other's being upset doesn't seem to be an issue so I don't think that will be a roadblock or trouble. * I think *

I also do NOT take anyone's word for any condition of infliction they "say" they have. I require a doctor's statement that CLEARLY outlines the diagnosis and the requirements of the diagnosis so I am pretty sure that requirement would prove or disprove the "trendy" stuff....kwim?

My biggest concern is I really don't want to have to do anything similar to having a severe peanut allergy in care....Does that make sense?

I don't want to worry that just because a knife touched a plate, that a child could possibly die. That is WAY to much liability to take on and I am cautious and hesitant about doing any type of "special" when possible death is a concern.

I just HATE not having info so until I actually meet with the family this afternoon, I don't really have knowledge of the severity of what I may or may not be dealing with.

Quote:
Originally Posted by canadiancare View Post
There are 3 actual conditions. Celiac which is a genetic auto immune disease, gluten intolerance which is similar to lactose intolerance and wheat allergy which is rare and like a peanut allergy potentially deadly.
That's good information. Along with the link you previously provided. Thank you!
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:00 AM
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To be tested for celiac you do the opposite of an elimination diet because they need a biopsy of your lower intestine while flared up.

My friend's son was misdiagnosed with celiac when he actually had Crohn's and he was studying in my city far from home so we ended up trying to get him sorted for her. A real flare up looks excruciating.
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:05 AM
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Originally Posted by canadiancare View Post
To be tested for celiac you do the opposite of an elimination diet because they need a biopsy of your lower intestine while flared up.

My friend's son was misdiagnosed with celiac when he actually had Crohn's and he was studying in my city far from home so we ended up trying to get him sorted for her. A real flare up looks excruciating.
My daughter had the blood test for it which thankfully was positive so she didn't need the biopsy. My Grandmother needed a biopsy and she said it was a terrible experience. Granted she was 65 and already in poor health.
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:13 AM
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The child I had everything was provided-even milk. I stored the milk at my house so it wasn't having to go back and forth everyday.

Nothing could be cross contaminated so I would fix their food first then the rest afterwards. They were allowed to have the fruit/veggies but that was it. All bread, snacks, special treats, sandwiches came from home. The parents tried the best they could to have special treats and snacks to not be to different then everyone elses.

It can also cause learning delays which this child had along with physical delays. They have been in special needs class their entire schooling so far-middle school at this time.

Lots of diarehha, blow outs and immunity seemed lower so they seemed to pick alot of sicknesses up. That was the issue though, you never knew if the diarehha was from the celiac or from being sick because of being frequent.

The childs parents I had were the best and did everything they could to maintain normalicy for their child but didn't take it lightly either. They didn't throw it around as an crutch for their child but were very active in finding out everything they could about it. They always kept me up on everything and if there were changes I was the first to know.

Its not just tummy issues and shouldn't be taken as so. There is alot to learn about this and constant updating in literature on it.

Ask for a doctors/nutrionist note confirming this. Let them know unless you have an official diagnosis you won't be able to do all the "extra".

Last edited by Country Kids; 05-08-2013 at 07:27 AM. Reason: added wording
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:17 AM
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ask if the child has been tested
ask them about cross contamination (if they don't know anything about it, then I wonder if they are doing the new gluten thing)
what happens if the child eats some with gluten or wheat
what foods would they be bringing
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:18 AM
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Originally Posted by Greenplasticwateringcans View Post
My daughter had the blood test for it which thankfully was positive so she didn't need the biopsy. My Grandmother needed a biopsy and she said it was a terrible experience. Granted she was 65 and already in poor health.
Here the blood test is used to screen for antibodies but a final diagnosis is always done with the biopsy.

I don't think they test under 3 here unless there is failure to thrive happening.
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Old 05-08-2013, 07:22 AM
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Here the blood test is used to screen for antibodies but a final diagnosis is always done with the biopsy.

I don't think they test under 3 here unless there is failure to thrive happening.
The children are 2 and 4. Both have it.
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Old 05-08-2013, 08:08 AM
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The children are 2 and 4. Both have it.
I say if you think it is a good fit and you are willing to take it on go for it. You seem to be someone with a good head on your shoulders (or you play one on the Internet)
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Old 05-08-2013, 08:11 AM
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I have Celiacs.

If they are providing meals that will greatly simplify your life. I think I've read before that you use disposable cups and plates??? If so, that will also greatly simplify your life because ANY plastic plate/cup that has had anything containing gluten in it is considered contaminated even if it has gone through the dishwasher. Any serving utensils will need to be metal that you use (whether it's to scoop their food out of something or for them to eat off of).

There's also various things that have gluten in them that you don't even think about. Play-Doh is the first thing at the top of my mind when it comes to daycare.
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Old 05-08-2013, 08:11 AM
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I say if you think it is a good fit and you are willing to take it on go for it. You seem to be someone with a good head on your shoulders (or you play one on the Internet)


The only thing I promise every day is to TRY.

I'll update you more about the specifics once I meet with them this afternoon.
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Old 05-08-2013, 08:21 AM
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I have Celiacs.

If they are providing meals that will greatly simplify your life. I think I've read before that you use disposable cups and plates??? If so, that will also greatly simplify your life because ANY plastic plate/cup that has had anything containing gluten in it is considered contaminated even if it has gone through the dishwasher. Any serving utensils will need to be metal that you use (whether it's to scoop their food out of something or for them to eat off of).

There's also various things that have gluten in them that you don't even think about. Play-Doh is the first thing at the top of my mind when it comes to daycare.
I totally forgot the playdough thing!

I think its has to be a very researched thing before making the final decision.

I remember my kitchen becoming very, very sterile and not even liking my own family using it.
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Old 05-08-2013, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by EntropyControlSpecialist View Post
I have Celiacs.

If they are providing meals that will greatly simplify your life. I think I've read before that you use disposable cups and plates??? If so, that will also greatly simplify your life because ANY plastic plate/cup that has had anything containing gluten in it is considered contaminated even if it has gone through the dishwasher. Any serving utensils will need to be metal that you use (whether it's to scoop their food out of something or for them to eat off of).

There's also various things that have gluten in them that you don't even think about. Play-Doh is the first thing at the top of my mind when it comes to daycare.
Yes, I use disposable plates and cups so that part won't be an issue.

From what little info I have as of right now, it sounds as if it isn't super serious so that is good.

I will definitely be prepared though with lots of questions for this family!

The play-doh thing won't really be an issue as actual Play-doh brand stuff makes my DH gag so we rarely use anything other than modeling clay.

I have made home made play dough recipe's before but I wonder if I could use gluten free flour instead?...Do they even make that?

What do YOU use in your program?
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Old 05-08-2013, 08:50 AM
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I've had the "trendy" gluten free kid where DCP suddenly said DCB had Celiacs (DCB had been here 3mos, normal diet, no issues) but explained it the same as you are getting now "a little tummy issue." My DCP supplied the food at first for then realized how much it was costing and suddenly wanted me to provide it, but couldn't provide a DR note. DCB now eats what everyone else does (mostly), because DCM has changed her mind, "its not Celiacs, probably dairy" so now he has soy milk she provides.

In your case though, where DCPs are already providing it for both, I think I'd be willing to try. I might be hesitant if it was severe, peanut allergy like, as my kitchen is small and I'd be very paranoid of cross contamination from that or my messy little ones.
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Old 05-08-2013, 09:20 AM
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Everyone else has said a bunch of stuff already, but I just wanted to chime in and say that even things like makeup and lotions (and playdough which has been mentioned) have ingredients in them that are unsafe for those with celiacs.

And yes, I have seen somewhere, making a gluten-free playdough. On Pinterest maybe?
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Old 05-08-2013, 09:26 AM
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Quote:
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I've had the "trendy" gluten free kid where DCP suddenly said DCB had Celiacs (DCB had been here 3mos, normal diet, no issues) but explained it the same as you are getting now "a little tummy issue." My DCP supplied the food at first for then realized how much it was costing and suddenly wanted me to provide it, but couldn't provide a DR note. DCB now eats what everyone else does (mostly), because DCM has changed her mind, "its not Celiacs, probably dairy" so now he has soy milk she provides.

In your case though, where DCPs are already providing it for both, I think I'd be willing to try. I might be hesitant if it was severe, peanut allergy like, as my kitchen is small and I'd be very paranoid of cross contamination from that or my messy little ones.
thats what I'm wondering too. When someone says "a little tummy trouble" what does that really mean.
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Old 05-08-2013, 10:33 AM
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I have a child who is on a gluten and dairy free diet along with no red dye! His parents never said he had Celiacs disease, but he can't have ANY thing that contains gluten or dairy. At first I thought it would be really hard to manage. The parents did bring food at first, but I now buy it and it's not really that hard to make meals without those ingredients. Meijer (I don't know if you have one by you) has a gluten free dry section and also a freezer section, but since they are providing food, it seems like it would be easy. But after reading about all the things you have to do to prevent cross contamination if the child has true Celiacs disease, not just an intolerance I think I might be a little leary (sp?) of taking the child just because of me myself being afraid of messing up. The child that I have can eat off of plates washed in a dishwasher and stuff like that so it's just an intolerance.
And Willow brought up a good point of the other children wanting the other child's food. It would just depend on the child/ren. The child that I have that is gluten and dairy free is 32 months and he knows that certain foods will hurt his tummy and doesn't ever ask for the other children's food-he did try to grab a cracker once, but that's it. As for the other children who are 30, 21, and 19 months old, they aren't gluten free and they never really ask for the gluten free child's food and if they do, I explain that it's for M and he can't have our food or it will hurt his belly and they usually go back to their own food or occasionally I will let them try it. But with that said, I only have 4 out of my six children who eat table food sitting by each other and I sit with them when they eat so it's pretty easy to make sure everyone is eating their own food.
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Old 05-08-2013, 10:36 AM
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Fellow Celiac here. Wheat, barley and rye are the things to stay away from - all contain gluten. Others have offered great advice already. If the family is willing to provide food, I'd do that.
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Old 05-08-2013, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Country Kids View Post
I totally forgot the playdough thing!

I think its has to be a very researched thing before making the final decision.

I remember my kitchen becoming very, very sterile and not even liking my own family using it.
Sometimes you can make it a little easier on yourself by sectioning off things. I have a specific gluten free part of the pantry, certain gluten free utensils/plates/bowls, certain gluten free cabinet (for cookware), and a certain gluten free counter even. The gluten free drawer/cabinet/counter all have labels on them that read: "GLUTEN FREE! DO NOT TOUCH!" My counter is only able to be "gluten free" in this house that I purchased used because it is granite. If it were that plasticy-type of countertop (formica?) or wood I wouldn't trust it and would have to lay those flimsy cutting boards over it to set bowls/plates/cups on when preparing foods.

Sometimes, I think it'd jus be easier to wear a bubble suit.
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Old 05-08-2013, 10:41 AM
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thats what I'm wondering too. When someone says "a little tummy trouble" what does that really mean.
It affects everyone differently. If I unknowingly get a small bit of gluten, I get very sick. Like having a bad case of the flu, with diarrhea. I get so weak and run down and can barely function. I have to have someone else care for my children, because I can barely care for myself when it happens. Some people have bloating, gas, stomach pain, etc. - anything associated with stomach issues. I've known some to break out in a bad rash in addition to all the other symptoms.
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Old 05-08-2013, 10:42 AM
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Yes, I use disposable plates and cups so that part won't be an issue.

From what little info I have as of right now, it sounds as if it isn't super serious so that is good.

I will definitely be prepared though with lots of questions for this family!

The play-doh thing won't really be an issue as actual Play-doh brand stuff makes my DH gag so we rarely use anything other than modeling clay.

I have made home made play dough recipe's before but I wonder if I could use gluten free flour instead?...Do they even make that?

What do YOU use in your program?
They make several types of flours that are gluten free! I bet you could even google "homemade gluten free dough" and find a bunch of recipes!

I actually do use Play-Doh because I don't touch it. I was gifted some in October and was gifted some by another parent in March, so free is free!
I have the children clean up afterwards (they know how to make a big ball to pick up play-doh crumbs) and then I put on gloves and scrub down the tables. Their tables are already contaminated with gluten since the food program just adores grains and the only ones I'm not allergic to that I serve the kids are corn tortillas, taco shells, and rice. I wear gloves a lot!

I said it in another thread once, but I, personally, wouldn't take on a child with Celiacs. How's that for a double standard?
The lengths I go through to prepare my own meals and prevent any cross contamination are crazy and I have to make my meals when the children aren't awake. I wouldn't feel comfortable taking on a child with the same issues as me. I make and eat breakfast before they arrive. I make my lunch on my gluten free counter and eat lunch during their naptime when ALL of their lunch stuff if put away and everything is scrubbed down so that I don't accidentally ingest any gluten. I also make and prepare dinner after they are completely gone (unless I put my items in the crockpot and then they are safe as they have a lid on them).
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Old 05-08-2013, 10:47 AM
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Also once you know for sure you shouldn't "cheat" because the long term effects on your system are life span shortening. Even if it seems like "just cramps" bad stuff is happening to your intestines with every flare up.

It is a horrible but manageable condition. You just have to be diligent.
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Old 05-08-2013, 10:48 AM
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Originally Posted by butterfly View Post
It affects everyone differently. If I unknowingly get a small bit of gluten, I get very sick. Like having a bad case of the flu, with diarrhea. I get so weak and run down and can barely function. I have to have someone else care for my children, because I can barely care for myself when it happens. Some people have bloating, gas, stomach pain, etc. - anything associated with stomach issues. I've known some to break out in a bad rash in addition to all the other symptoms.
Same here with the addition of stomach pain that is tremendous. I can handle everything but the weak/run down feeling. When I've come into contact with gluten (at an old job it happened too many times due to their own careless ways), the lack of energy that I have is beyond ridiculous. I could drink 10 cups of coffee and still feel like I can barely move.
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Old 05-08-2013, 10:57 AM
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They make several types of flours that are gluten free! I bet you could even google "homemade gluten free dough" and find a bunch of recipes!

I actually do use Play-Doh because I don't touch it. I was gifted some in October and was gifted some by another parent in March, so free is free!
I have the children clean up afterwards (they know how to make a big ball to pick up play-doh crumbs) and then I put on gloves and scrub down the tables. Their tables are already contaminated with gluten since the food program just adores grains and the only ones I'm not allergic to that I serve the kids are corn tortillas, taco shells, and rice. I wear gloves a lot!

I said it in another thread once, but I, personally, wouldn't take on a child with Celiacs. How's that for a double standard?
The lengths I go through to prepare my own meals and prevent any cross contamination are crazy and I have to make my meals when the children aren't awake. I wouldn't feel comfortable taking on a child with the same issues as me. I make and eat breakfast before they arrive. I make my lunch on my gluten free counter and eat lunch during their naptime when ALL of their lunch stuff if put away and everything is scrubbed down so that I don't accidentally ingest any gluten. I also make and prepare dinner after they are completely gone (unless I put my items in the crockpot and then they are safe as they have a lid on them).
Wow, it is really interesting hearing what you can and can't do and what you have to do to manage Celiacs. Before I began caring for a child with a gluten/dairy free allergy, (his just an intolerance, but I still researched it and came across Celiacs and from seeing it on here) I had no idea that this was a disease. No one that I know of has it. I didn't know what it took to manage it so that you don't get sick.
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:07 AM
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Wouldn't be a problem for me because my family already eats gluten-free---completely grain-free in fact.
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:12 AM
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There are so many gluten free options now that's very easy to avoid gluten. There are tons of gluten-free flours, gluten-free bread, really... everything.

If the kids are intolerant to gluten and not severely allergic, I wouldn't think twice about taking them. You just wouldn't feed them any wheat, oat, or barley products. Also be aware that gluten is found in many processed foods. If the parents provide all food it should be no big deal.

If they are severely allergic and just a crumb of any of the above ingredients causes them problems, I would think really hard before agreeing to do it.
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:16 AM
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Celiac isn't an allergy. It is a disease where the villi of the small intestine (kind of like plant roots) are damaged by gluten and can't absorb nutrients properly. Continued abuse/exposure can lead to bowel cancer.
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:21 AM
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Celiac isn't an allergy. It is a disease where the villi of the small intestine (kind of like plant roots) are damaged by gluten and can't absorb nutrients properly. Continued abuse/exposure can lead to bowel cancer.
I call it an allergy because most people can identify with that when I say I can't have X, Y, Z nor can I have anything that might be cross contaminated.
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:37 AM
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I call it an allergy because most people can identify with that when I say I can't have X, Y, Z nor can I have anything that might be cross contaminated.
Understood. I just am someone who prefers to use proper vocabulary to be as accurate as possible esp. with health facts.

I wouldn't want someone to think it is as easy as popping an antihistamine or an Imodium after a plate of pasta.
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:39 AM
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Understood. I just am someone who prefers to use proper vocabulary to be as accurate as possible esp. with health facts.

I wouldn't want someone to think it is as easy as popping an antihistamine or an Imodium after a plate of pasta.
I never considered that!
I tend to discuss cross contamination in great detail to people in real life and use the words "severe allergy" hoping to convey how serious it really is. But, perhaps I shouldn't.
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:48 AM
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I never considered that!
I tend to discuss cross contamination in great detail to people in real life and use the words "severe allergy" hoping to convey how serious it really is. But, perhaps I shouldn't.
It is your disease you can own it how you want. I just know that there are people who always downplay the seriousness of certain health conditions and yours is one that can't be messed with.

There is supposed to be a vaccine that is pretty close to being ready for human testing. Fingers crossed for you.
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:51 AM
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It is your disease you can own it how you want. I just know that there are people who always downplay the seriousness of certain health conditions and yours is one that can't be messed with.

There is supposed to be a vaccine that is pretty close to being ready for human testing. Fingers crossed for you.
Like people who say my DH has an illness

He's type 1 diabetic. It isn't an illness because it isn't going to go away.
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:53 AM
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I have two peanut anaphylactic kids in my care one is my son and the other is also allergic to shrimp, gluten and corn. All meals are packed from home so we have no problems. The kids know we don't share food and for holidays and crafts we do non-food activities. I follow basic cleaning guidelines like wiping down the table and having kids wash hands after each meal. It works great for us! I've been watching the DCB with multiple food allergies for a year now with no problems. We have epi-pens on hand in case of emergency and I take them with us when we go anywhere. If you are not preparing their food or snacks I don't see any problem.

One of the main things to ask allergy families is what their level of comfort about foods and cross contamination is. I do not allow my son to eat any packaged foods because of the risk of cross contamination. But DCB's mom allows him to eat anything as long as his allergens are not a primary ingredient. We have differing comfort levels. But like I said, if the parents provide all food and snacks the only thing you will likely need to provide is a clean place to eat and supervision so the kids don't share foods.

As for play-doh, a quick Pinterest or google search will come up with tons of fun goops and flubbers that don't require flour.
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Old 05-08-2013, 11:55 AM
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Like people who say my DH has an illness

He's type 1 diabetic. It isn't an illness because it isn't going to go away.
Exactly. It isn't as easy as going off the rails with your eating and then taking a shot of insulin.
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Old 05-08-2013, 03:14 PM
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Well...the kids have Celiacs to the point of SEVERE and cross contamination is something the parent's are basically terrified of.

Mom has a severe peanut allergy so badly that she asked the I not serve anything peanut related so the kids don't carry home minute traces of anything.

The 2.5 year old is still takes a bottle and must be rocked to sleep.

Mom is insisting that the 4 year old needs a minimum of 3 hours of "intensive" academic time (mom's words).

Although the parents would be supplying all the foods, they did ask that I modify what I feed the children due to cross contamination (both for the Celiacs and mom's peanut allergy) concerns.

I am pretty sure that I am not a good fit for what they are looking for in a caregiver.

So, thanks for the info on Celiac's ladies...I appreciate the help! If I ever have a family that I do take on that has it, I will be much better prepared.
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  #43  
Old 05-08-2013, 03:20 PM
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Well...the kids have Celiacs to the point of SEVERE and cross contamination is something the parent's are basically terrified of.

Mom has a severe peanut allergy so badly that she asked the I not serve anything peanut related so the kids don't carry home minute traces of anything.

The 2.5 year old is still takes a bottle and must be rocked to sleep.

Mom is insisting that the 4 year old needs a minimum of 3 hours of "intensive" academic time (mom's words).

Although the parents would be supplying all the foods, they did ask that I modify what I feed the children due to cross contamination (both for the Celiacs and mom's peanut allergy) concerns.

I am pretty sure that I am not a good fit for what they are looking for in a caregiver.

So, thanks for the info on Celiac's ladies...I appreciate the help! If I ever have a family that I do take on that has it, I will be much better prepared.
In the end it came down to a little more then "a tummy issue" it sounds like.

I'm glad everyone was able to help you with information!

Is this the same mom that was asking "Why your hubby would come to the childcare"?

Last edited by Country Kids; 05-08-2013 at 03:21 PM. Reason: added wording
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Old 05-08-2013, 06:16 PM
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I'd say the best fit for this family would be a private in home caregiver.
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  #45  
Old 05-08-2013, 06:17 PM
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I'd say the best fit for this family would be a private in home caregiver.
That would be a great solution for them.
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  #46  
Old 05-08-2013, 06:42 PM
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I'd say the best fit for this family would be a private in home caregiver.
Boy do i agree with this.

I wasn't able to post earlier but i do have a boy who has gluten sensitivities. No cross contamination problems. He is so sweet and i think i have taught mom more about being more diligent with his sensitivities.
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  #47  
Old 05-08-2013, 08:09 PM
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Well...the kids have Celiacs to the point of SEVERE and cross contamination is something the parent's are basically terrified of.

Mom has a severe peanut allergy so badly that she asked the I not serve anything peanut related so the kids don't carry home minute traces of anything.

The 2.5 year old is still takes a bottle and must be rocked to sleep.

Mom is insisting that the 4 year old needs a minimum of 3 hours of "intensive" academic time (mom's words).

Although the parents would be supplying all the foods, they did ask that I modify what I feed the children due to cross contamination (both for the Celiacs and mom's peanut allergy) concerns.

I am pretty sure that I am not a good fit for what they are looking for in a caregiver.

So, thanks for the info on Celiac's ladies...I appreciate the help! If I ever have a family that I do take on that has it, I will be much better prepared.
Totally fits easily into a daycare.
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  #48  
Old 05-09-2013, 06:09 AM
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I have Celiacs.

If they are providing meals that will greatly simplify your life. I think I've read before that you use disposable cups and plates??? If so, that will also greatly simplify your life because ANY plastic plate/cup that has had anything containing gluten in it is considered contaminated even if it has gone through the dishwasher. Any serving utensils will need to be metal that you use (whether it's to scoop their food out of something or for them to eat off of).

There's also various things that have gluten in them that you don't even think about. Play-Doh is the first thing at the top of my mind when it comes to daycare.
Yes, to all this. I have gluten and wheat intolerance, as well as dairy intolerance, and others. I have eliminated a lot of stuff. Soy sauce is a surprising source of gluten as well. If it's true Celiac disease, you'll need some separate cooking supplies..colander, etc. Also,you have to be very careful about flour particulates from your kitchen being in the air if they're very susceptible. Good luck though-Especially if the parents provide some food, shouldn't be too hard.
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Old 05-09-2013, 10:34 AM
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funny how "a little tummy trouble" is acually something really big with this family. i don't think they are going to be able to find outside care because its going to be hard to contain other kids. I would have suggested a nanny for them. And intensive ciriculum for a 4 yr old, then what is the mom teaching her kid.
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