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  #1  
Old 04-12-2016, 06:58 AM
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Default Children Separated by Pay Type

Recently, my one year old was moved to a new room at her day care center. This was not unexpected as I knew she couldn't stay with the babies forever. However, shortly after the move, I learned that the center was separating children by the method in which they are paid. Private pay infants and toddlers are in one room together, while infants and toddlers receiving DHS subsidy have not been moved and are grouped by age and like development.

The center is the recipient of a grant, which I believe is issued by the state. The grant provides diapers and formula for children who qualify. The child must receive DHS subsidy to qualify. The grant also provided the center with new furniture including cribs and shelving/cubbies, new flooring and new toys/ equipment for every room. Every room except the "private pay" room.

As a result of these recent developments, my child is now in a disorganized, thrown together, make-shift room with babies much younger than her. Honestly, I'm upset. I want to address this with the director, but I don't want to come forth without solid reasoning and cause unnecessary drama either. I feel like children being separated because of payment method is not ethical. What would you do if you were in this situation.
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Old 04-12-2016, 07:07 AM
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I cannot speak for legalities from the daycare perspective because I don't accept subsidy, so I'm not sure.

However, I can speak personally. I would never segregate my daycare like that. They're children and all are entitled to the same proper care and equipment. And if you're unhappy with it, there's nothing wrong with at least asking what is going on. If you're not satisfied (as I don't believe I would be), I'd pull and take somewhere else. No drama necessary.
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Old 04-12-2016, 07:09 AM
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Recently, my one year old was moved to a new room at her day care center. This was not unexpected as I knew she couldn't stay with the babies forever. However, shortly after the move, I learned that the center was separating children by the method in which they are paid. Private pay infants and toddlers are in one room together, while infants and toddlers receiving DHS subsidy have not been moved and are grouped by age and like development.

The center is the recipient of a grant, which I believe is issued by the state. The grant provides diapers and formula for children who qualify. The child must receive DHS subsidy to qualify. The grant also provided the center with new furniture including cribs and shelving/cubbies, new flooring and new toys/ equipment for every room. Every room except the "private pay" room.

As a result of these recent developments, my child is now in a disorganized, thrown together, make-shift room with babies much younger than her. Honestly, I'm upset. I want to address this with the director, but I don't want to come forth without solid reasoning and cause unnecessary drama either. I feel like children being separated because of payment method is not ethical. What would you do if you were in this situation.
How did this information come your way?
Also what state is this?

As for approaching the director, just ask.

If it's true, there IS reason to address it.
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Old 04-12-2016, 07:44 AM
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How did this information come your way?
Also what state is this?

As for approaching the director, just ask.

If it's true, there IS reason to address it.
I posted this question before I was registered under this username. I am the OP

The center has been very open about the grant and the changes it would bring to the center. However, I have a family member at the center. More specifically the director, who informed me of the private pay vs subsidy situation. This information is very true. This is in Oklahoma.

I have no problem approaching the situation, I am simply seeking opinions to determine if I may be blowing this out of proportion.
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Old 04-12-2016, 07:55 AM
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I would be livid! I can not believe this is legal.......Segregation of any kind should not be tolerated.The school should have all the children grouped as licencing says.I know many schools have infants up to age 15 months .Then they move on...I can not imagine this is legal.That would be like having school children who receive free or discounted lunch not only sitting separately but getting different meals.I hope its not legal. If I were you I would absolutely talk to the Directer.If you do not get the answers I would call licencing.Good luck.
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Old 04-12-2016, 07:56 AM
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The grant is per room. The room is for subsidy aka "at risk" children.

The supplies are FOR those children specifically. With required supplies lists.

You will have to complain at a federal level for this. I know we have been.
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Old 04-12-2016, 08:07 AM
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The grant is per room. The room is for subsidy aka "at risk" children.

The supplies are FOR those children specifically. With required supplies lists.

You will have to complain at a federal level for this. I know we have been.
So are you saying the feds are segregating this? I guess I am glad I don't accept subsidy. Not sure it would make a difference in home care anyway. But to me, any improvements I make to my program should be to the benefit of all children. It is my belief if you benefit one, you benefit them all!
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Old 04-12-2016, 08:13 AM
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I would be livid! I can not believe this is legal.......Segregation of any kind should not be tolerated.
The staff in that room also have higher training requirements to meet the specialized needs of "at risk" kids.

It is part of a grant. For that specific room.

Think franchised head start.
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Old 04-12-2016, 08:17 AM
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So are you saying the feds are segregating this?
No. Eventually it will spread to all rooms as they meet certain requirements. They are usually tiered.

I've had 10 grand worth of supplies so far, in three separate stages over 4 years.
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Old 04-12-2016, 08:18 AM
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The staff in that room also have higher training requirements to meet the specialized needs of "at risk" kids.

It is part of a grant. For that specific room.

Think franchised head start.
Because that program has been such a raving success!
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Old 04-12-2016, 08:24 AM
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Because that program has been such a raving success!
Yeah, I think that is why they are beta testing this program.
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Old 04-12-2016, 08:47 AM
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Now, if I were to have top of the line supplies and ONLY allow my private pay clients children access, but kept the state pay kids in a different room with old toys, etc. I would get in big trouble.

I find this alarming.
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Old 04-12-2016, 08:52 AM
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I posted this question before I was registered under this username. I am the OP

The center has been very open about the grant and the changes it would bring to the center. However, I have a family member at the center. More specifically the director, who informed me of the private pay vs subsidy situation. This information is very true. This is in Oklahoma.

I have no problem approaching the situation, I am simply seeking opinions to determine if I may be blowing this out of proportion.
Personally, I DO feel it's something complaint worthy.... at ANY level that will listen. Feedback is any consumers biggest advocate.

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Originally Posted by rosieteddy View Post
I would be livid! I can not believe this is legal.......Segregation of any kind should not be tolerated.The school should have all the children grouped as licencing says.I know many schools have infants up to age 15 months .Then they move on...I can not imagine this is legal.That would be like having school children who receive free or discounted lunch not only sitting separately but getting different meals.I hope its not legal. If I were you I would absolutely talk to the Directer.If you do not get the answers I would call licencing.Good luck.
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Now, if I were to have top of the line supplies and ONLY allow my private pay clients children access, but kept the state pay kids in a different room with old toys, etc. I would get in big trouble.

I find this alarming.
See, now I've come across many different types of discrimination but it always seems that ANY TIME the action benefits the less fortunate, it's not defined as discrimination.

There are certain "requirements" I must give families in my care that are receiving subsidy but do not have to extend the same to those that do not receive subsidy.

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Originally Posted by Cat Herder View Post
The grant is per room. The room is for subsidy aka "at risk" children.

The supplies are FOR those children specifically. With required supplies lists.

You will have to complain at a federal level for this. I know we have been.
I've gotten many grants/perks etc from federal programs but I've never had one, nor heard of one that was so blatantly discriminating.
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Old 04-12-2016, 08:54 AM
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Now, if I were to have top of the line supplies and ONLY allow my private pay clients children access, but kept the state pay kids in a different room with old toys, etc. I would get in big trouble.

I find this alarming.
It really is no different than the gifted, alternative, charter and special ed programs all throughout our public education systems.

The board of education is not interested in fair. They assume parents who can Will provide those experiences and supplies for their own children. These federal programs are for those who can't.

I also suspect some is about statistic gathering. Showing improvements in a select group.
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Old 04-12-2016, 09:22 AM
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I've gotten many grants/perks etc from federal programs but I've never had one, nor heard of one that was so blatantly discriminating.
But it is not really.

They are still growing and adding a room. Somebody's kids had to go in there. The grant is to benefit subsidy kids, so subsidy kids get first choice of slots in new rooms.

Just like a Pre-K class and the standard "4 year old class" in the same private center. One belongs to and is overseen by the BOE, the other is a private center overseen by CCR&R. KWIM?
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Old 04-12-2016, 09:24 AM
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I'm still confused. Every room in this center was part of the grant. Once, the grant materials were applied to the entire center, another make-shift room was opened for private pay babies. So, are you telling me that these children whose parents pay out-of-pocket don't receive the same standard of care as the subsidized children? What makes subsidized children "at risk"? And why is income even a factor when it comes to child care standards? I make $12/mo over the income limits for DHS subsidy in my state. I understand that there has to be defined limitations for this. However, it's absolutely insane to say that my $12/mo extra is reason to put my child in a sub-standard room. $12/mo means my child doesn't deserve the same staff with "higher training requirements". $12/mo justifies the center is allowed to not hold every room to the same standards.
As PlayCare noted, If the tables were turned and only the private pay children had access to the newest equipment while DHS children were grouped together in a separate room, this would be a HUGE issue.
I'm having a difficult time wrapping my head around the idea that child care is not equal to all children, regardless of their parents income. Such discrimination is a great injustice to our children, regardless of income status.
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Old 04-12-2016, 09:25 AM
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But it is not really.

They are still growing and adding a room. Somebody's kids had to go in there. The grant is to benefit subsidy kids, so subsidy kids get first choice of slots in new rooms.

Just like a Pre-K class and the standard "4 year old class" in the same private center. One belongs to and is over seen by the BOE, the other is a private center over seen by CCR&R. KWIM?
But that kind of separate seems so blatantly obvious and so clearly divided.... I mean atleast attempt to look as if 'everyone' has a shot...kwim?

Even Head Start accepts a certain number of children/families over income to keep up the appearance of non-discrimination.
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Old 04-12-2016, 09:29 AM
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BC and Mama, I hear you both. You are preaching to the choir. This is why I don't accept subsidy.

It will follow you all through your childs education. It just will.

My honor kids had to share a book between 3 students while the kids with a criminal record were given laptops to take home. It is how it will be....

The only real vote we have is with our feet.
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Old 04-12-2016, 09:30 AM
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It really is no different than the gifted, alternative, charter and special ed programs all throughout our public education systems.

The board of education is not interested in fair. They assume parents who can Will provide those experiences and supplies for their own children. These federal programs are for those who can't.

I also suspect some is about statistic gathering. Showing improvements in a select group.
How so? Those programs above are avalible for all students that NEED those things, regardless of income.
(I'm speaking specially to SPED programs, talented and gifted programs. In my state/area charter schools are awful and no parent in their right mind would send their kid )

One of my kids receives some sped services. We weren't told we were on our own because we had the ability pay for it. My other child is in gifted classes, same thing. The school/state provides those things. I mean, we can't force the school to allow our one child who struggles into the talented and gifted program. But that's because she's perfectly ordinary not because we make too much.
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Old 04-12-2016, 09:39 AM
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Playcare, I was referring to the amount allocated per program.
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Old 04-12-2016, 09:59 AM
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put my child in a sub-standard room.
I think this is the real issue. "Substandard". "Meets regulations" is now viewed as substandard.

My bet is after reading the state regulations and comparing them to the federal program regulations most will realize the new room is not actually substandard.

It is what was the norm and still above what many programs offer.

Not calling you out, Mama, just using that statement. I hear it a lot when discussing "quality" programs.
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Old 04-12-2016, 10:14 AM
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But that kind of separate seems so blatantly obvious and so clearly divided.... I mean atleast attempt to look as if 'everyone' has a shot...kwim?

Even Head Start accepts a certain number of children/families over income to keep up the appearance of non-discrimination.
I would expect that as soon as the new room makes ratio and becomes profitable they will upgrade it themselves. A few months, maybe?

I would ask them what their improvement plan was for that room. Try to nail them down to a specific date.
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Old 04-12-2016, 10:17 AM
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I think this is the real issue. "Substandard". "Meets regulations" is now viewed as substandard.

My bet is after reading the state regulations and comparing them to the federal program regulations most will realize the new room is not actually substandard.

It is what was the norm and still above what many programs offer.

Not calling you out, Mama, just using that statement. I hear it a lot when discussing "quality" programs.
I'm not fully up to date on the licensing requirements. However, I am not completely in the dark about them either. When I say "substandard", I'm comparing to the rest of the center. Perhaps I should have chosen a different word. Maybe second-rate, inferior or lesser would be more appropriate here. Whatever the chosen adjective, the actions of the center don't sit well with me. To say that one child does not deserve the same quality of environment as another based on income is atrocious. I understand why the center wants to grant money. But they should have considered the ramifications that would ensue when segregating children in this manner.
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Old 04-12-2016, 10:21 AM
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I would expect that as soon as the new room makes ratio and becomes profitable they will upgrade it themselves. A few months, maybe?

I would ask them what their improvement plan was for that room. Try to nail them down to a specific date.
Yes, I will absolutely be questioning improvements to the new room. I appreciate the input from everyone involved in this thread. I now feel like I am informed enough to bring this to the director and see where it goes.
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Old 04-12-2016, 10:23 AM
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But they should have considered the ramifications that would ensue when segregating children in this manner.
I am confident they did.

I am not trying to upset you. I am trying to explain it from a business perspective.

The risk of losing a few private pay clients did not outweigh the risk of losing a federal contract.

Again, I would expect them to upgrade as soon as the room becomes profitable enough to support it.
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Old 04-12-2016, 10:48 AM
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The risk of losing a few private pay clients did not outweigh the risk of losing a federal contract.
This is what breaks my heart. It is so incredibly difficult for private pay parents to find child care in my area. The affordable centers are riddled with non-compliances. The compliant centers are out of reach or have a one year waiting list. The only reason I have a spot in this center is because I was subsidy when I enrolled.
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Old 04-12-2016, 10:53 AM
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This is what breaks my heart. It is so incredibly difficult for private pay parents to find child care in my area. The affordable centers are riddled with non-compliances. The compliant centers are out of reach or have a one year waiting list. The only reason I have a spot in this center is because I was subsidy when I enrolled.
Mine as well. It is why I keep my rates low by applying for every grant possible without having to accept subsidy. My waiting list is at 4 years, now..

It is getting harder and harder to do. We are being forced out of business. Our ratios keep being lowered while our training, regulations and supply lists keep getting more and more expensive.

I hope you stick around the forum. You have more of an ability to make a difference than most providers with this issue.
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Old 04-12-2016, 11:03 AM
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Mine as well. It is why I keep my rates low by applying for every grant possible without having to accept subsidy. My waiting list is at 4 years, now..

It is getting harder and harder to do. We are being forced out of business. Our ratios keep being lowered while our training, regulations and supply lists keep getting more and more expensive.

I hope you stick around the forum. You have more of an ability to make a difference than most providers with this issue.
Yea, please feel welcome to stick around!

I have found that it just isn't worth it to me to accept subsidy. The hoops they want me to jump through here are outrageous. And the pay is substandard! I have found I can lower my rates for private pay, and skip subsidy payments, because the low rate the pay, and the amount of money it would cost me to keep up to the demands of the system. I am sure I would loose money taking subsidy. I would be full and have a waiting list longer than I am tall if I did, because many providers in my area won't take it.
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Old 04-12-2016, 11:24 AM
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I will definitely stick around. I really appreciate the open discussion here. Honest without being salty. Thank you all, I am armed with knowledge and will go forth into the director's office with confidence!
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Old 04-12-2016, 11:53 AM
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I will definitely stick around. I really appreciate the open discussion here. Honest without being salty. Thank you all, I am armed with knowledge and will go forth into the director's office with confidence!
Well if what is being said here is true, it may not do any good. The director may be powerless over the situation. That would make me sad. Is it a corporate center? Some of those big corporate centers don't give the directors much power either.
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Old 04-12-2016, 12:02 PM
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Well if what is being said here is true, it may not do any good. The director may be powerless over the situation. That would make me sad. Is it a corporate center? Some of those big corporate centers don't give the directors much power either.
It is not a corporate center. It's locally owned by a couple with 5 or 6 other centers. This one is unique in that it is in a church, with no affiliation to the church itself. I understand that the director may not have any control over this situation. I still feel like I need to address my concerns with her. Surely I'm not the only parent who feels this way. Even if nothing changes for my child, perhaps somewhere down the line, it can change for others.
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Old 04-12-2016, 12:04 PM
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It is not a corporate center. It's locally owned by a couple with 5 or 6 other centers. This one is unique in that it is in a church, with no affiliation to the church itself. I understand that the director may not have any control over this situation. I still feel like I need to address my concerns with her. Surely I'm not the only parent who feels this way. Even if nothing changes for my child, perhaps somewhere down the line, it can change for others.
Yes still talk to her for sure. Perhaps since it isn't a big corporate place maybe she can do something. Let us know how it goes!
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Old 04-13-2016, 09:02 AM
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If the tables were turned and only the private pay children had access to the newest equipment while DHS children were grouped together in a separate room, this would be a HUGE issue.
I honestly don't know where you can go with that (there must be a place or a person for that), but if you ever do go somewhere to complain about this, use the quoted as one of your points. equality and all that. liberty and justice for all, right?
otherwise, sorry you have to go through that, especially since you don't seem to have any other option, and just pulling your child may do more harm than good.
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Old 04-13-2016, 09:24 AM
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I honestly don't know where you can go with that (there must be a place or a person for that), but if you ever do go somewhere to complain about this, use the quoted as one of your points. equality and all that. liberty and justice for all, right?
otherwise, sorry you have to go through that, especially since you don't seem to have any other option, and just pulling your child may do more harm than good.
The media is always a good place to vent.

Whatever method of media a person chooses to use is up to them but providers in my state have had some great successes by "venting" and sharing feedback via our local and statewide media sources.
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Old 04-13-2016, 09:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Cat Herder View Post
Mine as well. It is why I keep my rates low by applying for every grant possible without having to accept subsidy. My waiting list is at 4 years, now..

It is getting harder and harder to do. We are being forced out of business. Our ratios keep being lowered while our training, regulations and supply lists keep getting more and more expensive.

I hope you stick around the forum. You have more of an ability to make a difference than most providers with this issue.
I refuse to accept subsidy, and because of this I have an odd clientele that is all higher income but for whatever reason chose not to use a nanny (typically because they only have one child and want the socialization/school aspect) Dr's, dentists, local newswoman, etc.

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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
The media is always a good place to vent.

Whatever method of media a person chooses to use is up to them but providers in my state have had some great successes by "venting" and sharing feedback via our local and statewide media sources.
I would comment or message a local news on facebook. That you have loved the care received, but are shocked with the regulations of segregation that the state has enforced.

Yes, please stick around! It's wonderful to have a parent perspective!
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Old 04-14-2016, 01:11 PM
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Don't think I haven't thought about going to media with this issue! I want to talk to the director first, as she is a family member. Unfortunately she has been out sick. After she has had a chance to respond, I would like to talk to the owner because she is the facilitator of all this. She's very brash and I can see her telling me to take my child elsewhere if
I'm not happy. She will be the one to really fan the flames and send me straight to media outlets!
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Old 04-14-2016, 01:25 PM
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http://www.heritage.org/research/rep...empty-promises

This might interest you, Mama. Notice how long this debate has been going...

Scroll down to the Oklahoma section..
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Old 04-14-2016, 02:16 PM
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I'm still going to argue that those gains that children make, then lose, is because of our public schools, NOT because they didn't make them in the first place.

I was a family childcare provider for 14 years, and have been a HS Home Visitor for 6 months. I am appalled at the difference between the children I cared for then and the children I serve now. They are so behind, for the most part, it's sad. As frustrated as I sometimes got with daycare families that didn't seem to really care what was going on with their children during the day (how or what they learned), at least I had them 9 hours a day and they learned! The kiddos I serve now, I see 1 1/2 hours a week. I see progress; but 1 1/2 hours a week is a drop in the bucket.

We have to document every single visit to every single child, and track their development. We have to do quarterly reports to show their gains. I'm telling you, as frustrating as it is, the gains are there. Without HS, these kids would be way behind when they get to school.

As far as one classroom getting grant money and therefore being able to offer better materials or equipment for those kids, I wish it weren't the case. But, honestly, that's what the money is allotted for. We used to be able to get grants that benefited ALL the children in our group; those grants are gone. Years ago, having low-income children in your group did give you extra "points" in your grant application, but it wasn't as in-your-face as this program seems to be.
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Old 04-14-2016, 04:40 PM
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I'm still going to argue that those gains that children make, then lose, is because of our public schools, NOT because they didn't make them in the first place.

I was a family childcare provider for 14 years, and have been a HS Home Visitor for 6 months. I am appalled at the difference between the children I cared for then and the children I serve now. They are so behind, for the most part, it's sad. As frustrated as I sometimes got with daycare families that didn't seem to really care what was going on with their children during the day (how or what they learned), at least I had them 9 hours a day and they learned! The kiddos I serve now, I see 1 1/2 hours a week. I see progress; but 1 1/2 hours a week is a drop in the bucket.

We have to document every single visit to every single child, and track their development. We have to do quarterly reports to show their gains. I'm telling you, as frustrating as it is, the gains are there. Without HS, these kids would be way behind when they get to school.

As far as one classroom getting grant money and therefore being able to offer better materials or equipment for those kids, I wish it weren't the case. But, honestly, that's what the money is allotted for. We used to be able to get grants that benefited ALL the children in our group; those grants are gone. Years ago, having low-income children in your group did give you extra "points" in your grant application, but it wasn't as in-your-face as this program seems to be.
Well I can only speak for my experience with HS. DD qualified when she was little, due to her assessment. She also qualified for pre K where she would have been bussed. I beleived that HS would be better so sent her there. She learned nothing that she wouldn't have learned at my home daycare, maybe less. When I asked them about it, the teacher told me (and I can quote I was so appalled I remember it to this day) "we don't teach in HS, this is more for socialization so they can learn to play". I was at least doing some teaching in my daycare. I really feel like I cheated her sending her to HS. She was not ready for kindy. Now to be fair, she has a July 23 birthday so part of not being ready MAY have been age, but the school wouldn't hold her back when we asked they wanted to put her in special ed with in the autistic room 4 hours a day for first grade. DD did not then and has never been diagnosed with any medical or mental issues to cause learning problems. They threatened to take us to court to put her in that classroom. We changed schools she had the same teacher first and second grades who worked her backside up to help DD catch up.

We moved to Ohio in the middle of second grade, the teacher told us there was no way DD would pass the test in third grade to move on and suggested we hold her back in second. It made a world of difference for her with NO special ed, and no autistic classroom.

So in my experience, HS is a complete and total waste of taxpayer dollars and gets us nowhere.

Which brings me to my next question. Now not only do we have HS but we have "no child left behind". How do we go from Head Start to left behind?
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Old 04-16-2016, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Cat Herder View Post
The grant is per room. The room is for subsidy aka "at risk" children.

The supplies are FOR those children specifically. With required supplies lists.

You will have to complain at a federal level for this. I know we have been.


You saved me a lot of typing.
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Old 04-16-2016, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Thriftylady View Post
Well I can only speak for my experience with HS. DD qualified when she was little, due to her assessment. She also qualified for pre K where she would have been bussed. I beleived that HS would be better so sent her there. She learned nothing that she wouldn't have learned at my home daycare, maybe less. When I asked them about it, the teacher told me (and I can quote I was so appalled I remember it to this day) "we don't teach in HS, this is more for socialization so they can learn to play". I was at least doing some teaching in my daycare. I really feel like I cheated her sending her to HS. She was not ready for kindy. Now to be fair, she has a July 23 birthday so part of not being ready MAY have been age, but the school wouldn't hold her back when we asked they wanted to put her in special ed with in the autistic room 4 hours a day for first grade. DD did not then and has never been diagnosed with any medical or mental issues to cause learning problems. They threatened to take us to court to put her in that classroom. We changed schools she had the same teacher first and second grades who worked her backside up to help DD catch up.

We moved to Ohio in the middle of second grade, the teacher told us there was no way DD would pass the test in third grade to move on and suggested we hold her back in second. It made a world of difference for her with NO special ed, and no autistic classroom.

So in my experience, HS is a complete and total waste of taxpayer dollars and gets us nowhere.

Which brings me to my next question. Now not only do we have HS but we have "no child left behind". How do we go from Head Start to left behind?
I don't doubt this one bit! However, the children I work with are not IN daycare. They are at home, most of them in fairly disfunctional families. Most all the parents work, but they work part-time/split-shift/second shift low-income jobs. Our job as Home Visitors is to try to help the children develop socially, emotionally, and cognitively so that when they get to school, they are where most of their peers are. We do health screenings, make sure they get their checkups, immunizations, and dental exams.

As for our centers, yes, they are play based. They also do developmental and mental health assessments,provide healthy meals (food program), set goals for individual children, and plan activities based on those goals. The social aspect his HUGE, but as childcare providers, I'm pretty sure that's what we've been arguing all along. It's not about craming a whole lot of facts into their brains before they get to school; it's about them being ready to learn once they get to school. With HS, we just have to document everything. To death...

Children who live in poverty are less likely to have the experiences middle-income children do. There are no trips to the zoo, the children's museum, sometimes even the grocery store. They don't get read to, they don't go to the library. We've got families of 5 or 6 people who live in campers year round. Not exactly an ideal learning enviroment.

So, I agree that maybe it didn't help your DD any more than your daycare did. But, that's because you run a quality daycare program. Most of our kiddos would be at home, with the same 1 or 2 adults, until they reached Kindy if it weren't for HS. "Head Start" is really a kinder way to say "So they're not so far behind". If we sold it as "hey, we don't want your kid to be behind when they get to school because your poor and undereducated", most people would probably not say "yeah, sure, that's me".

I don't know if HS is the most efficient way to spend taxpayer money to make sure low-income children are ready for school. But, I will say that I do not beleive it's a waste of money.
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Old 04-20-2016, 09:48 AM
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I have met with the director at my center regarding the issues of segregation based on payment method and the quality of equipment and care provided in the "private pay room".

She was able to show me the plans in place for improving the room, which does not include furniture, equipment or toys at this time. It is strictly a wall being built which will allow the rooms to become more organized and "put together". (If you'll recall, the room is in a make-shift state right now.) She has lined up 2 additional teachers with early childhood education degrees for the room. However, DHS is backlogged for completing background and fingerprint checks (according to the director). In the meantime, the room has revolving teachers, which is taking a toll on the infants and toddlers that occupy it. They need stability, and that's not what they're getting right now.

I was not the first parent to come forth with concerns about the segregation. Many parents have expressed concern about their child being moved to this less than appealing room. One parent stated that he felt like he was "Throwing his hard earned money down the drain" each time he stepped into the room. Which I understand his frustration. He pays a large amount every month to one of the top-rated centers in our area and in return, his child is not afforded the same benefits and experiences as those who pay nothing each month.

I do feel a little better after having aired my concerns. But I know that there will not be a quick resolution. If I want to see progress I will have to stick around and wait it out.
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Old 04-20-2016, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by MamaMightSnap View Post
I have met with the director at my center regarding the issues of segregation based on payment method and the quality of equipment and care provided in the "private pay room".

She was able to show me the plans in place for improving the room, which does not include furniture, equipment or toys at this time. It is strictly a wall being built which will allow the rooms to become more organized and "put together". (If you'll recall, the room is in a make-shift state right now.) She has lined up 2 additional teachers with early childhood education degrees for the room. However, DHS is backlogged for completing background and fingerprint checks (according to the director). In the meantime, the room has revolving teachers, which is taking a toll on the infants and toddlers that occupy it. They need stability, and that's not what they're getting right now.

I was not the first parent to come forth with concerns about the segregation. Many parents have expressed concern about their child being moved to this less than appealing room. One parent stated that he felt like he was "Throwing his hard earned money down the drain" each time he stepped into the room. Which I understand his frustration. He pays a large amount every month to one of the top-rated centers in our area and in return, his child is not afforded the same benefits and experiences as those who pay nothing each month.

I do feel a little better after having aired my concerns. But I know that there will not be a quick resolution. If I want to see progress I will have to stick around and wait it out.
Sadly that statement (bolded above ^^) applies to ALOT of things in society now days.
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Old 04-20-2016, 10:26 AM
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I do feel a little better after having aired my concerns. But I know that there will not be a quick resolution. If I want to see progress I will have to stick around and wait it out.
You could ask for reduced tuition to match your new reduced services.

You could start a PTA fundraiser for supplies.

You could find another center/provider.

Waiting for other people to meet my needs is not in my nature. I am glad you said something, though.
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Old 04-20-2016, 01:39 PM
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You could ask for reduced tuition to match your new reduced services.

You could start a PTA fundraiser for supplies.

You could find another center/provider.

Waiting for other people to meet my needs is not in my nature. I am glad you said something, though.
Reduced rate, that's a great idea! As is a parent sponsored fundraiser. Rally all of the parents in the entire center to raise funds, then tell them "Sorry! Your child will only benefit from these funds if they are private pay!"

I've thought about finding a new provider, but it took me SO LONG to get into this center. I had to push back my start date with my employer because I didn't have child care. I figure by the time my name gets to the top of another center's waiting list, my baby will be in school and this won't be an issue any longer.

I'm definitely keeping an eye on this and will hold the director to her promises of improvements. I'm patient, I can sit back and let them try to keep me happy.
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Old 04-21-2016, 05:46 AM
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Originally Posted by MamaMightSnap View Post
Reduced rate, that's a great idea! As is a parent sponsored fundraiser. Rally all of the parents in the entire center to raise funds, then tell them "Sorry! Your child will only benefit from these funds if they are private pay!"

I've thought about finding a new provider, but it took me SO LONG to get into this center. I had to push back my start date with my employer because I didn't have child care. I figure by the time my name gets to the top of another center's waiting list, my baby will be in school and this won't be an issue any longer.

I'm definitely keeping an eye on this and will hold the director to her promises of improvements. I'm patient, I can sit back and let them try to keep me happy.
So do some interview with other day cares and get put on their waiting list. You never know you could get a call sooner than you think.
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Old 04-21-2016, 06:35 AM
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Well I can only speak for my experience with HS. DD qualified when she was little, due to her assessment. She also qualified for pre K where she would have been bussed. I beleived that HS would be better so sent her there. She learned nothing that she wouldn't have learned at my home daycare, maybe less. When I asked them about it, the teacher told me (and I can quote I was so appalled I remember it to this day) "we don't teach in HS, this is more for socialization so they can learn to play". I was at least doing some teaching in my daycare. I really feel like I cheated her sending her to HS. She was not ready for kindy. Now to be fair, she has a July 23 birthday so part of not being ready MAY have been age, but the school wouldn't hold her back when we asked they wanted to put her in special ed with in the autistic room 4 hours a day for first grade. DD did not then and has never been diagnosed with any medical or mental issues to cause learning problems. They threatened to take us to court to put her in that classroom. We changed schools she had the same teacher first and second grades who worked her backside up to help DD catch up.

We moved to Ohio in the middle of second grade, the teacher told us there was no way DD would pass the test in third grade to move on and suggested we hold her back in second. It made a world of difference for her with NO special ed, and no autistic classroom.

So in my experience, HS is a complete and total waste of taxpayer dollars and gets us nowhere.

Which brings me to my next question. Now not only do we have HS but we have "no child left behind". How do we go from Head Start to left behind?
I had a home visitor when I was starting up my day care. She asked if I would be sending dd to the three year olds HS. I said no, if I can homeschool my child k-12 then why not preschool. She agreed and admitted HS for three yo was for socialization and play. She also commented that my dd was on target and that she didn't see the need to continue with home vists.

As for no child left behind, I was told there target was more of a finanaclly means. My foster kids got there field trips paid for and continued transportion to and from school, even when they move to a Foster home that was out of the school district. (sometimes this meant that the school would pay for a taxi, or another person to drive the child)
*Side note, I told the school no way was my 8 yo foster girl giving to ride with a random taxi driver, my sister volunteer to do it and they paid her.

The program also continues transportation for children that become homeless (like the family losses a home due to fire or eviction and move out of school district) , so they don't have to continue changing schools every time they move.

There is another part of the program that supplies foster kids with school supplies, which any way states that foster homes refuse to supply the kids with the supplies but on other hand my one foster girl gave away everything that I bought for her (or i think it was bullied from her), so it came in handy when she needed more stuff.

I know that the transportation is at every school but the supplies and field trip thing did vary. One school sent back my check and told me it was covered, while the other school said that "if they had the funds available" -
School supplies was the same way, one child came home with supplies, while the other one got in trouble for not having the supplies needed.
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