Daycare.com Forum

Go Back   Daycare.com Forum > Parents and Guardians Forum

Parents and Guardians Forum Parents and Guardians should post and answer questions here.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #101  
Old 03-23-2014, 10:40 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"My power goes out and I can't use my Direct TV. I want Direct TV to credit me for the days my power goes out. "

Side note- my parents work for the cable company, and people actually do call and ask for this, and they do get the credit. Have always thought it was funny, but they'd rather throw the few bucks their way or give them a free on demand movie than get yelled at!
Reply With Quote
  #102  
Old 04-01-2014, 04:09 PM
saved4always's Avatar
saved4always saved4always is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,011
Default

For my in home daycare, I watched all teacher's children. At first, I did not charge for snow days. However, one winter we had many snow days and not getting paid for all of those days killed my budget. I changed my policy to require full pay for snow days. I was there and available to watch the kids, so, I changed my policy to make snow days paid. My situation was a little different since I was technically "open".
Reply With Quote
  #103  
Old 04-01-2014, 04:21 PM
saved4always's Avatar
saved4always saved4always is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 1,011
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
As a parent I think it's bull. If I can get my child to the daycare then the daycare should provide the care. The other day my wife was dropping our kid off and the normal opening person was leaving saying they was not going to be open due to the weather. The employee made it there just fine as did my wife, but left us in a bind.

I shouldn't be forced to keep a backup plan that I can use at the drop of a hat because those plans are rarely possible. At the very least if you must charge then snow days should be only 25% of a normal day. Would it kill anyone to be a honest person and not try to screw a hard working person over? Because not only are you forcing them to pay for a service you're not providing but you are making them bend over backwards to find another provider or not go into work themselves.

If I can't make it then charge me for that day, no issues at all from me. But when I can make it and you won't then yes we have issues and I will be seeking out a different provider.
When I worked full time outside the home, there was a big snow storm. I took the bus downtown and my husband went to drop the kids off at our daycare center. My husband got there and it was closed. He was so angry and called me to come home so he could go to work. Turns out that there was a level 3 snow emergency for the county which means the county sheriff dept. determined that the roads were bad enough that only emergency vehicles were allowed to be on the roads. My husband could have totally been ticketed for driving (in spite of his opinion otherwise, his engineering job was not an "emergency" worker ). So, even though my husband got to the daycare safely, it was not actually safe for him or the daycare workers to be on the road. The daycare needs to take into account the safety of employees based on weather conditions against the inconvenience to parents.
Reply With Quote
  #104  
Old 04-02-2014, 07:03 AM
debbiedoeszip's Avatar
debbiedoeszip debbiedoeszip is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 412
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by saved4always View Post
For my in home daycare, I watched all teacher's children. At first, I did not charge for snow days. However, one winter we had many snow days and not getting paid for all of those days killed my budget. I changed my policy to require full pay for snow days. I was there and available to watch the kids, so, I changed my policy to make snow days paid. My situation was a little different since I was technically "open".
I would also charge if I was open and ready to provide care. I live in southern Ontario, Canada. Between heavy snowfalls and/or freezing rain, it gets pretty messy here from November to April. I don't plan to charge if I choose to close the daycare, but then I will likely not close unless the power goes out and is likely to stay out for more than a few hours (in winter).

Living where I do, with the road equipment that we have, I've never experienced weather so bad that all area roads were closed. They often will close a section of a road if there are problems on that particular section (problems like an accident or severe damage to the road itself), but you can still get where you need to go by taking other roads. They will sometimes suggest that no one should be out driving, but they don't prevent you from doing so. It's at your own risk.

I probably would close, and not charge for that day, if all area roads were closed. Around here, that would likely only happen in the event of the arrival of the apocalypse, though. LOL.
Reply With Quote
  #105  
Old 04-02-2014, 11:33 AM
Childminder's Avatar
Childminder Childminder is offline
Advanced Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: MI
Posts: 1,499
Default

Do you pay your lease payment if it snows and you can't drive anywhere? Do you pay for a school/college tuition if you can't go because of snow? If you dock your boat at a marina and can't use it do you still have to pay? If the answer is yes to any of the above then you should pay your childcare bill if the weather shuts them down.
__________________
I see little people.
Reply With Quote
  #106  
Old 04-02-2014, 01:48 PM
blandino's Avatar
blandino blandino is offline
Daycare.com member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Tulsa area
Posts: 1,508
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Childminder View Post
Do you pay your lease payment if it snows and you can't drive anywhere? Do you pay for a school/college tuition if you can't go because of snow? If you dock your boat at a marina and can't use it do you still have to pay? If the answer is yes to any of the above then you should pay your childcare bill if the weather shuts them down.
It always amazes me that people would never ask a private school for tuition back if they were going to be out, or if the school closed for a snow day. Last year I had a family that was going on two separate vacations, one 2 weeks and the other 3 weeks, and they wanted a tuition break since he wouldn't be in attendance. You would never ask a school for a break since you weren't there, and to me a private school is the closest thing to a compare to a daycare.
Reply With Quote
  #107  
Old 04-21-2014, 01:18 PM
CtheLove's Avatar
CtheLove CtheLove is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Virginia
Posts: 34
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowDayMom View Post
{okay I broke down and got a user name }

Okay, let's talk about that. What you're describing is a recurring charge that happens whether I use the service or not. For example, I have a monthly newspaper subscription. It would be ludicrous and unreasonable for me to call my newspaper provider and say, "I know you delivered the paper every day like you promised, but I only read it three times. So can I have my money back for the other 27 days?"

This is totally different. Let's look at MV's scenario: MV paid for a gym membership and was DENIED use of the gym for two days, but was charged for it anyway. Know what I'd be doing? (I know you know...) I'D BE COMPLAINING. It's not fair.

Maybe MV's contract is clear that if the roof falls in she still has to pay for the gym membership--I don't know. But that doesn't make it fair and it would probably cause her to look for another gym.

SilverSabre, you're likening it to a "spot held"...as in, almost like a club membership, but it's not the same thing.

I've really thought about this, and I've considered your scenario of a school situation, and I've decided that schools are far more justified in closing (i.e. CHOOSING not to perform the service that day) because they have kids waiting for the bus and they are actually transporting children. That doesn't really address if it's still fair for them to charge me, but it at least helps explain part of my beef, in that, why do these darn daycares close SO MUCH??? McDonald's isn't closed. The Post Office isn't closed. My corporation I work for isn't closed, but guess what...my DAYCARE is closed. WHY????

Oh! But my daycare transports kids! To kindergarten and such! Oh wait...but they DON'T do that when SCHOOL'S CLOSED (which is the only time daycare's also closed). So there goes that argument in their favor...

But to directly answer your question, yes I would feel different if it was a private Catholic school, and here's why (and I'll totally ignore the transportation issue I mention above):

1) I'm paying for an EDUCATION, NOT child care services. Snow day or not, they can probably *overall* prove that they are still providing my child with the good education I'm paying for, plus they'd point to the state laws and say, "We were in session this year the minimum amount we were required to be in session."

NET: I GOT WHAT I PAID FOR. (But when daycare is closed for snow, I DO NOT get what I paid for)

2) I don't pay "tuition". I pay by the week for child care. I should receive the child care I paid for or I shouldn't have to pay for it.

3) Finally, in order to provide an adequate education, the state determines how many days schools have to be in session (I'm assuming this applies to private schools too). So let's look at it another way. By state law let's say they have to be in school for a minimum of 200 days. Due to snow days (for which I still had to pay! *sob*) they only have been in school for 190 days. I'm guessing, that *if* I pay a yearly tuition and not weekly, and *if* that private school then has to extend their school year by adding TWO WEEKS to the end of the school year, I'm guessing I DO NOT get billed for that extra two weeks ON TOP of the yearly tuition I already paid. In other words....I *STILL* got what I paid for and I didn't have to pay any extra to get it.

And if we're looking at this as what I'm BUYING and what I'm GETTING, think about it this way. What if I bought a private high-school "education" for my child and that school CHOSE that year not to teach ANY MATH at all (because their math teacher quit! and it wasn't THEIR fault! and it would be challenging to find another math teacher! and they still have to pay their bills/other teachers/licences etc!) and I had to go to another private school or tutor and pay for my child to learn his/her math... Sound fair?

That's really what's happening when the daycare closes for snow. I paid for child care. I was refused child care. I had to buy child care from some other provider. And somehow this is supposed to be fair?
In know this comment is old but it made me pretty mad.
The part about if it's a private school your paying for education not childcare services. Do you think that we don't education your child? What a slap in the face! How about I just park your kid in front of the tv for the 10 hrs most kids are here and call it a day. I won't provided toys, I won't provide any art supplies, I won't teach them their letter, numbers, shapes or colors. Oh your kid needs to be potty trained not my problem cause that's TEACHING them to use the toilet. I won't TEACH them walk or talk. I won't TEACH them to be polite or use their manners. Who cares if a kid is hitting or kick, biting, or pushing. I'll just tell the parents it's not my job to teach them that I'm not an educator.
You just don't understand how much we do teach and educate your child and your comment just shows that you have no respect for us or what we do!
Reply With Quote
  #108  
Old 01-27-2015, 12:52 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Exclamation still don't get it

After reading most of the comments from child care providers, I still don't get it it. I understand if a center with paid staff needs to close to keep their staff off the road, etc. Fine. If you are charging parents full tuition, then there is absolutely no excuse NOT to pay your staff for the snow day. All the arguments for charging tuition also apply to paying your staff a living wage for the unexpected closure. That's another issue about good labor practices.

This post is a plea to be discerning when you close down. Sounds like a lot of providers on this post are making assumptions about the relative wealth of their clients and their presumed level of disposable income.

My issue is that my home daycare provider is closing for two days when all forecasts are saying that this storm will be over by the end of tomorrow. Yes, public schools are closed. That's to keep buses off the road and protect kids from standing in snow banks while waiting for school buses. What does that have to do with my HOME daycare provider? She used to stay open for parents who needed the care, which is why people choose home daycare - it's more reliable in many ways. But now, she wants to follow center policies (they get to close -and I could sure use a day off). Guess I'll be looking for a center where my kids will be more stimulated anyways. (Really - they are getting really bored there). By the way, my provider does not have any children, etc, and works with her mother who also lives in the house. I chose her because I liked their family, facilities, and their promise that there would be few unexpected closures.

I'm a single divorced mother of two receiving nothing from dad. I don't get paid time off. I can't work from home when the 2 and 4 year old are home. (I am typing this at 3:30am as I take a break from some work I brought home). If I have to find alternate care, then I am paying twice - and paying more than I earn for a single day. Childcare providers should not take closures lightly. And stop talking about the contract. I expect to be home with the kids when it is truly unsafe to drive. I also expect to pay in these rare circumstances. I am expected to be at work when the roads are cleared. And I expect to be able to take my kids to daycare when there is no holiday or emergency road conditions. I'm paying for it.
Reply With Quote
  #109  
Old 01-27-2015, 03:27 AM
Play Care's Avatar
Play Care Play Care is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 6,585
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
After reading most of the comments from child care providers, I still don't get it it. I understand if a center with paid staff needs to close to keep their staff off the road, etc. Fine. If you are charging parents full tuition, then there is absolutely no excuse NOT to pay your staff for the snow day. All the arguments for charging tuition also apply to paying your staff a living wage for the unexpected closure. That's another issue about good labor practices.

This post is a plea to be discerning when you close down. Sounds like a lot of providers on this post are making assumptions about the relative wealth of their clients and their presumed level of disposable income.

My issue is that my home daycare provider is closing for two days when all forecasts are saying that this storm will be over by the end of tomorrow. Yes, public schools are closed. That's to keep buses off the road and protect kids from standing in snow banks while waiting for school buses. What does that have to do with my HOME daycare provider? She used to stay open for parents who needed the care, which is why people choose home daycare - it's more reliable in many ways. But now, she wants to follow center policies (they get to close -and I could sure use a day off). Guess I'll be looking for a center where my kids will be more stimulated anyways. (Really - they are getting really bored there). By the way, my provider does not have any children, etc, and works with her mother who also lives in the house. I chose her because I liked their family, facilities, and their promise that there would be few unexpected closures.

I'm a single divorced mother of two receiving nothing from dad. I don't get paid time off. I can't work from home when the 2 and 4 year old are home. (I am typing this at 3:30am as I take a break from some work I brought home). If I have to find alternate care, then I am paying twice - and paying more than I earn for a single day. Childcare providers should not take closures lightly. And stop talking about the contract. I expect to be home with the kids when it is truly unsafe to drive. I also expect to pay in these rare circumstances. I am expected to be at work when the roads are cleared. And I expect to be able to take my kids to daycare when there is no holiday or emergency road conditions. I'm paying for it.
I'll tell you why, STATE REGULATIONS.

Many states ask that licensed care providers strongly consider closing when weather conditions makes road travel unsafe. Why? Because it's not enough for you to get your child TO day care, you need to be able to pick them up FROM day care should something come up (the provider loses power, your child becomes ill, or, heaven forbid gets injured while at day care) If, heaven forbid, something were to happen, and bad weather or road conditions were to cause a delay for parents or emergency services to get to the providers home, the state will go after the provider for TWO things 1. that a child was hurt in their care (even if it wasn't the providers fault, she's still in trouble...) and 2. Being open when conditions were not conducive to it. This means your provider could be shut down pending an investigation, or permanently.
(and this happened locally, so I'm not overreacting )

This also means day care/homeowners insurance may not pay out for accidents/injuries caused on a bad weather day - if the snow/ice is coming down and I can't keep up with removal and a dck or dcp slips, falls and hurts themselves on my drive/walk I am LIABLE for any injuries they may suffer. If licensing says I shouldn't have been open anyway, you can bet insurance will get out of paying out

Just like a center, the in home provider (if she's a good one) has already purchased supplies for the day - food, craft material, other curriculum materials, etc. If she takes the day without pay, she may not be able to operate in the Black. This means eventually she has to close and get a "real" job that pays her bills, leaving clients in the lurch. Just like any business, the in home provider is doing this job to MAKE money.

The bottom line is that while the general population views in homes as "babysitters" who can set their own hours and policies, that simply isn't true if they are licensed. Both the state and insurance companies view licensed in homes as they businesses they are, and subject to the rules and regulations of the state. I can't say to licensing "I'm not going to follow this reg because it inconvenience my clients." A parent can't give a licensed provider permission to do the wrong thing.

It does sound as if you need a different care option, I know centers around here tend not to close for snow days, and hardly any holidays. That may be the better option for you. Or perhaps network with neighbors to see if any teens could babysit for the day when you have to work and dc is closed.
Since you know your providers policy and it doesn't work for you, it's not a good idea to stay and let things stew. Good luck!
Reply With Quote
  #110  
Old 01-27-2015, 04:09 AM
Second Home's Avatar
Second Home Second Home is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,478
Default

Also when a storm hits and there is a state of emergency declared people are not supposed to travel on the roads . So you are not supposed to be going to work or travel to get to daycare .

Last week I had someone have to walk the quarter mile down my unplowed road and then carry their child back the quarter mile to get to their car which was stuck at the side of the road .
Reply With Quote
  #111  
Old 01-27-2015, 09:05 AM
daycarediva's Avatar
daycarediva daycarediva is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 10,810
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Play Care View Post
I'll tell you why, STATE REGULATIONS.

Many states ask that licensed care providers strongly consider closing when weather conditions makes road travel unsafe. Why? Because it's not enough for you to get your child TO day care, you need to be able to pick them up FROM day care should something come up (the provider loses power, your child becomes ill, or, heaven forbid gets injured while at day care) If, heaven forbid, something were to happen, and bad weather or road conditions were to cause a delay for parents or emergency services to get to the providers home, the state will go after the provider for TWO things 1. that a child was hurt in their care (even if it wasn't the providers fault, she's still in trouble...) and 2. Being open when conditions were not conducive to it. This means your provider could be shut down pending an investigation, or permanently.
(and this happened locally, so I'm not overreacting )

This also means day care/homeowners insurance may not pay out for accidents/injuries caused on a bad weather day - if the snow/ice is coming down and I can't keep up with removal and a dck or dcp slips, falls and hurts themselves on my drive/walk I am LIABLE for any injuries they may suffer. If licensing says I shouldn't have been open anyway, you can bet insurance will get out of paying out

Just like a center, the in home provider (if she's a good one) has already purchased supplies for the day - food, craft material, other curriculum materials, etc. If she takes the day without pay, she may not be able to operate in the Black. This means eventually she has to close and get a "real" job that pays her bills, leaving clients in the lurch. Just like any business, the in home provider is doing this job to MAKE money.

The bottom line is that while the general population views in homes as "babysitters" who can set their own hours and policies, that simply isn't true if they are licensed. Both the state and insurance companies view licensed in homes as they businesses they are, and subject to the rules and regulations of the state. I can't say to licensing "I'm not going to follow this reg because it inconvenience my clients." A parent can't give a licensed provider permission to do the wrong thing.

It does sound as if you need a different care option, I know centers around here tend not to close for snow days, and hardly any holidays. That may be the better option for you. Or perhaps network with neighbors to see if any teens could babysit for the day when you have to work and dc is closed.
Since you know your providers policy and it doesn't work for you, it's not a good idea to stay and let things stew. Good luck!


I just knew with the storms in the northeast US that this was going to be dredged up yet again.

It's this simple: DON'T ENROLL YOUR CHILDREN IF YOU DON'T AGREE WITH THE POLICIES.

I close in a SOE, with pay. I cannot control acts of God, nor will I risk my livelihood and freedom to stay open for a parent willing to risk their child's safety to get to work.

We have specific state regulations, policies and plans in place for emergencies that cover all of this. I can be cited if BOTH my egresses aren't clear at all times, if it's snowing hard enough, with six small children in care, how am I supposed to keep these areas clear in the event of an emergency? I NEVER want to be placed in a situation where I cannot get children out safely in an emergency, where emergency personnel cannot arrive to my home in time to save a child, or where I have to evacuate due to power loss. These are very real, very possible scenarios. I am the business owner. I am liable. I am responsible.

I operated under a delay today, until roads were passable and the SOE was lifted. I NEVER want to place these children at risk. I NEVER want to be in one of the above scenarios. EVER. It's my absolute worst nightmare.

The safety of the children in my care is my highest priority, NOT a parent's inconvenience. MANY times, I have been the one to overrule a parent when a child's best interests aren't at heart (road conditions, illnesses, proper attire for weather, you name it).
Reply With Quote
  #112  
Old 01-27-2015, 09:32 AM
Blackcat31's Avatar
Blackcat31 Blackcat31 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 15,681
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
After reading most of the comments from child care providers, I still don't get it it. I understand if a center with paid staff needs to close to keep their staff off the road, etc. Fine. If you are charging parents full tuition, then there is absolutely no excuse NOT to pay your staff for the snow day. All the arguments for charging tuition also apply to paying your staff a living wage for the unexpected closure. That's another issue about good labor practices.

This post is a plea to be discerning when you close down. Sounds like a lot of providers on this post are making assumptions about the relative wealth of their clients and their presumed level of disposable income.

My issue is that my home daycare provider is closing for two days when all forecasts are saying that this storm will be over by the end of tomorrow. Yes, public schools are closed. That's to keep buses off the road and protect kids from standing in snow banks while waiting for school buses. What does that have to do with my HOME daycare provider? She used to stay open for parents who needed the care, which is why people choose home daycare - it's more reliable in many ways. But now, she wants to follow center policies (they get to close -and I could sure use a day off). Guess I'll be looking for a center where my kids will be more stimulated anyways. (Really - they are getting really bored there). By the way, my provider does not have any children, etc, and works with her mother who also lives in the house. I chose her because I liked their family, facilities, and their promise that there would be few unexpected closures.

I'm a single divorced mother of two receiving nothing from dad. I don't get paid time off. I can't work from home when the 2 and 4 year old are home. (I am typing this at 3:30am as I take a break from some work I brought home). If I have to find alternate care, then I am paying twice - and paying more than I earn for a single day. Childcare providers should not take closures lightly. And stop talking about the contract. I expect to be home with the kids when it is truly unsafe to drive. I also expect to pay in these rare circumstances. I am expected to be at work when the roads are cleared. And I expect to be able to take my kids to daycare when there is no holiday or emergency road conditions. I'm paying for it.
Wondering what this has to do with anything?

Being a single mother that gets nothing from the dad has NO bearing on this subject. NONE.

Being a single parent is NOT a disability. I'm am so tired of people tossing this concept into the equation like it bears some sort of weight in the argument.

Child care providers are among THE lowest paid workers in our country!!

Have you not been listening to any of the President's speeches lately.

Paying for a closed day here and there should not, in the grand scheme of things, be such a big deal if your provider offers quality care and leaves you with no fears when you drop your child off. That peace of mind is worth MORE than the couple dollars you have to fork out when Mother Nature decides to mess with us.
Reply With Quote
  #113  
Old 01-28-2015, 08:53 AM
sunlight's Avatar
sunlight sunlight is offline
New Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 109
Default

Blackcat well stated! I always have "those" certain parents that don't want to pay for a day where I close, they take off etc. I have parents that are bankers and work long hours so their children are here with me from sun up to sun down. They are the ONLY parents that automatically pay me on days off/closed. They never complain about it and feel they get paid on their days and holiday pay and so should I. The other families however right at the interview start asking if they have to pay on days closed/off. It does bother me and I try to get them to pay for the "spot" rather than the day. Sometimes this works and sometimes it doesn't.
Reply With Quote
  #114  
Old 02-20-2015, 12:29 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

At our daycare, our parents pay for a week at a time regardless of whether we r opened or not. If we have snow days like this week, our parents still pay.
Reply With Quote
  #115  
Old 02-26-2015, 11:29 AM
Sugaree's Avatar
Sugaree Sugaree is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Georgia
Posts: 81
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
"My power goes out and I can't use my Direct TV. I want Direct TV to credit me for the days my power goes out. "

Side note- my parents work for the cable company, and people actually do call and ask for this, and they do get the credit. Have always thought it was funny, but they'd rather throw the few bucks their way or give them a free on demand movie than get yelled at!
When I lived in hurricane country if you could prove that your power was out for a significant amount of time (more than a week) the cable company would prorate the bill. I guess that this was a good PR move on their part.
Reply With Quote
  #116  
Old 01-19-2016, 06:53 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Childcare Centers Should Remain Open During School Snow Days

It is my opinion that a licensed daycare provider who works from their home should not be closed for snow days simply because the schools are closed. The schools are closed for the safety of the children who walk and/or ride the busses that the schools provide for them. A daycare provider who is not liable for the transportation of their clients should remain open to those who are willing and able to bring their kids to the daycare. On another note, whether the parents decide it is safe enough to bring their child or not, all parents should pay full tuition for the day(s) because the daycare center should remain open. If the power is out or something more severe, this should be an acceptable reason to be closed. In conclusion, I believe that daycare centers should not be closed, but they still should require full tuition for snow days. They should be open for parents who still have to work to bring their children if they choose to do so, and if they do not and choose to stay home because they feel this is safer, they still must pay and this decision is up to them (or maybe their employer if they are required to attend work).
Reply With Quote
  #117  
Old 01-20-2016, 06:39 AM
Blackcat31's Avatar
Blackcat31 Blackcat31 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 15,681
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
It is my opinion that a licensed daycare provider who works from their home should not be closed for snow days simply because the schools are closed. The schools are closed for the safety of the children who walk and/or ride the busses that the schools provide for them. A daycare provider who is not liable for the transportation of their clients should remain open to those who are willing and able to bring their kids to the daycare. On another note, whether the parents decide it is safe enough to bring their child or not, all parents should pay full tuition for the day(s) because the daycare center should remain open. If the power is out or something more severe, this should be an acceptable reason to be closed. In conclusion, I believe that daycare centers should not be closed, but they still should require full tuition for snow days. They should be open for parents who still have to work to bring their children if they choose to do so, and if they do not and choose to stay home because they feel this is safer, they still must pay and this decision is up to them (or maybe their employer if they are required to attend work).
Sounds like you have it all figured out.

Your child care business should be a success!

If you are not a provider and are just commenting on the subject in general....my advice to you then is to interview every provider you are able to in order to find one that has policies that meet your needs or coincide with your beliefs.
Reply With Quote
  #118  
Old 01-20-2016, 06:50 AM
Thriftylady's Avatar
Thriftylady Thriftylady is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Ohio
Posts: 5,887
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
Sounds like you have it all figured out.

Your child care business should be a success!

If you are not a provider and are just commenting on the subject in general....my advice to you then is to interview every provider you are able to in order to find one that has policies that meet your needs or coincide with your beliefs.
Totally agree with this!

As a provider who normally doesn't close on snow days, I end up charging parents extra, because most of my kids are SA kiddos. It is a huge inconvenience for me when school closes because it often means a menu change. What I planned for one or two kiddos for lunch changes in a hurry when I find out at 7:30 AM I will instead have six for the day. It also means I plan extra activities and use extra art supplies. For that reason, I have in the contract what the additional fee is for non school days. But if I was going to close on school days, I would expect any parent to signed off on that contract to understand the contract will be followed.
Reply With Quote
  #119  
Old 01-20-2016, 08:00 AM
Leigh's Avatar
Leigh Leigh is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,563
Default

I have not had to close for a snow day before because my clients are smart enough not to try to take their kids out into a blizzard. However, in the event of a snow emergency, what is a provider to do when she has 12 kids trapped at her home because of weather? Roads DO become clogged and impassable-a smart provider would close when there is a risk of kids not being picked up. There are plenty of stupid parents out there who will call into work for a snow day and still risk life and limb to get their kids to daycare so that they can have a day alone. Providers who close do so for the safety and well-being of the children that they care for...they make the decision FOR that group of parents who can't be trusted to make a good decision on their own.
Reply With Quote
  #120  
Old 01-20-2016, 10:42 AM
nannyde's Avatar
nannyde nannyde is offline
All powerful, all knowing daycare whisperer
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Des Moines
Posts: 7,132
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
It is my opinion that a licensed daycare provider who works from their home should not be closed for snow days simply because the schools are closed. The schools are closed for the safety of the children who walk and/or ride the busses that the schools provide for them. A daycare provider who is not liable for the transportation of their clients should remain open to those who are willing and able to bring their kids to the daycare. On another note, whether the parents decide it is safe enough to bring their child or not, all parents should pay full tuition for the day(s) because the daycare center should remain open. If the power is out or something more severe, this should be an acceptable reason to be closed. In conclusion, I believe that daycare centers should not be closed, but they still should require full tuition for snow days. They should be open for parents who still have to work to bring their children if they choose to do so, and if they do not and choose to stay home because they feel this is safer, they still must pay and this decision is up to them (or maybe their employer if they are required to attend work).
The decision should be made based on whether the inclement weather prohibits or delays access to emergency services. Can 911 be called in an emergency and arrive in the same amount of time as regular weather.

If emergency services are overworked because of the weather it isn't safe to have a house full of kids who have little chance of accessing services while the others are being normally cared for.

The second concern is if staff can arrive on time and have their child care needs met.

Next, can the provider keep her property safe for arrivals and departures? A provider inside with kids can't keep the outside safe.
A center may not have access to their normal plowers in a huge snow event. Many providers have been stuck with kids while their parents are stuck in their driveway or street or on the way to pick them up. Many providers have had parents get stuck in their driveway and blocked it off for other incoming parents.

Then the odds that parents can get back to pick.up on TIME? Is there staff available to care for kids if parents are delayed?

The money is easy. Centers and providers just need to build closure days into their contract. If the average closures are five a year then build five into the contract. If they aren't used then the parents get a few days of care they didn't pay for over the course of a year. If they exceed five them refunds are issued for the sixth and over days for parents that have actually used the five days.

My experience is that most parents will call into work because of the drive but drive their kid to care so they can have a me day and an excuse if they are late. It's a pretty rare parent who will keep their kid home even if the weather is REALLY really dangerous.

Some will... but most won't.
Reply With Quote
  #121  
Old 01-20-2016, 02:58 PM
daycarediva's Avatar
daycarediva daycarediva is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 10,810
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nannyde View Post
The decision should be made based on whether the inclement weather prohibits or delays access to emergency services. Can 911 be called in an emergency and arrive in the same amount of time as regular weather.

If emergency services are overworked because of the weather it isn't safe to have a house full of kids who have little chance of accessing services while the others are being normally cared for.

The second concern is if staff can arrive on time and have their child care needs met.

Next, can the provider keep her property safe for arrivals and departures? A provider inside with kids can't keep the outside safe.
A center may not have access to their normal plowers in a huge snow event. Many providers have been stuck with kids while their parents are stuck in their driveway or street or on the way to pick them up. Many providers have had parents get stuck in their driveway and blocked it off for other incoming parents.

Then the odds that parents can get back to pick.up on TIME? Is there staff available to care for kids if parents are delayed?

The money is easy. Centers and providers just need to build closure days into their contract. If the average closures are five a year then build five into the contract. If they aren't used then the parents get a few days of care they didn't pay for over the course of a year. If they exceed five them refunds are issued for the sixth and over days for parents that have actually used the five days.

My experience is that most parents will call into work because of the drive but drive their kid to care so they can have a me day and an excuse if they are late. It's a pretty rare parent who will keep their kid home even if the weather is REALLY really dangerous.

Some will... but most won't.
My state licensing agency actually recommends we have a plan in place to CLOSE when there is severe weather. It IS a safety issue. I am legally required to keep two egresses clear of snow/safe to use. What if emergency services are delayed? What if (and this happened to me---) I get stuck with a a kid when roads are impassable?

Every state of emergency I close, with pay. It's in the contract parents sign. I have NEVER had a parent question it.
Reply With Quote
  #122  
Old 01-20-2016, 05:59 PM
Mad_Pistachio's Avatar
Mad_Pistachio Mad_Pistachio is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 510
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nannyde View Post
The decision should be made based on whether the inclement weather prohibits or delays access to emergency services. Can 911 be called in an emergency and arrive in the same amount of time as regular weather.

If emergency services are overworked because of the weather it isn't safe to have a house full of kids who have little chance of accessing services while the others are being normally cared for.

The second concern is if staff can arrive on time and have their child care needs met.

Next, can the provider keep her property safe for arrivals and departures? A provider inside with kids can't keep the outside safe.
A center may not have access to their normal plowers in a huge snow event. Many providers have been stuck with kids while their parents are stuck in their driveway or street or on the way to pick them up. Many providers have had parents get stuck in their driveway and blocked it off for other incoming parents.

Then the odds that parents can get back to pick.up on TIME? Is there staff available to care for kids if parents are delayed?

My experience is that most parents will call into work because of the drive but drive their kid to care so they can have a me day and an excuse if they are late. It's a pretty rare parent who will keep their kid home even if the weather is REALLY really dangerous.

Some will... but most won't.
see, as a parent, I have not thought about it this way. you are right: if my child needs emergency services, and they are unable to get there in a timely manner, that puts not only my child in danger, but the provider into a pretty sticky situation. not that I mind the daycare closing on a snow day, but those aspects just did not cross my mind because I have not really been on that side of the fence.

we had 4" today. our daycare was open. I kept our daughter home. because I could, and because I do not see a point of trying to make 2 trips 15 miles away in this weather when I don't really have to. we had fun: she made snow angels and shot me up with snowballs
Reply With Quote
  #123  
Old 01-21-2016, 09:48 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Seriously??

What it boils down to is you are paying for the SPOT and the SPOT only! You are not paying for attendance...you should have read the contract! It is silly to sign the contract (reading it or not) and then go and complain about it! If you are so unhappy go find a daycare that you can pay for attendance.

I am a family daycare and I will be closing tomorrow due to a nasty storm coming in. I will not remain open because of the parents.

You have parents who will risk their child's life in 30" of snow just so they can go back home and have a day off without their child. Meanwhile it is pouring the snow here and you decide to wait till 5:00 to come get your child and what do you know, you cannot get to daycare. Do you know how many times parents have been hours and hours past closing because they risk taking their child out in the snow. And I even had one stuck over night with me. Their bill was well into the thousands and I never saw a penny!

So honestly, you have NO RIGHT to fuss about a contract when you did sign it!!!!

Next time READ it and avoid all these complaints
Reply With Quote
  #124  
Old 01-21-2016, 10:57 PM
Febby's Avatar
Febby Febby is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 477
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mad_Pistachio View Post
see, as a parent, I have not thought about it this way. you are right: if my child needs emergency services, and they are unable to get there in a timely manner, that puts not only my child in danger, but the provider into a pretty sticky situation. not that I mind the daycare closing on a snow day, but those aspects just did not cross my mind because I have not really been on that side of the fence.

we had 4" today. our daycare was open. I kept our daughter home. because I could, and because I do not see a point of trying to make 2 trips 15 miles away in this weather when I don't really have to. we had fun: she made snow angels and shot me up with snowballs
I'm not sure where in my state you are, but we had about the same snowfall. My class had a lot of absences, but about 70% of the center's children showed up on Wednesday (1/20), including several school teachers' children. Schools were closed, of course. We had plenty of staff, but there were a couple other centers, including one big one, that had to turn parents away due to lack of staff.
Reply With Quote
  #125  
Old 01-22-2016, 05:58 AM
Mad_Pistachio's Avatar
Mad_Pistachio Mad_Pistachio is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 510
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Febby View Post
I'm not sure where in my state you are, but we had about the same snowfall. My class had a lot of absences, but about 70% of the center's children showed up on Wednesday (1/20), including several school teachers' children. Schools were closed, of course. We had plenty of staff, but there were a couple other centers, including one big one, that had to turn parents away due to lack of staff.
I'm in Louisville. and no, we are not teachers (my DH is software developer at a small bank chain, and I am a jobless student). what happened was, since my classes are all online this semester, I could manage my time enough to not fall behind, and this let me keep our daughter home. if the daycare was really close, she could have gone... or not. with it being 3 freeways away, I just did not feel like driving through the snow.
the daycare is relatively small, with the capacity of 49, and the director is always there (7 people on staff, including part-timers). most of the time, they are open. I think, once a year they do get into a pickle with the weather and have to close (we enrolled in May 2014, and this is the second closure due to weather).
my logic usually is, I don't absolutely have to go anywhere, so why not use this luxury and keep a child home when I don't trust the weather, the roads, and the drivers around me. I am in a much better position than, say, an emergency room doctor, who needs to be at work, come hell or high waters (used to work for one; never envied her money).

I can imagine something like Sacred Heart (it's the only huge one I know of) turning parents away because there is not enough staff. it is probably not an issue with our place.
Reply With Quote
  #126  
Old 01-22-2016, 09:41 AM
grateday's Avatar
grateday grateday is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 203
Default been a while

This is a great thread. I especially liked the part about the licensor saying providers should have a weather related policy in place, I like the person that stated that when you are on your own it is almost impossible to keep the driveways safe, accessible while maintaining the safety of the children (so true). Also the provider who made the comment about extending hours so parents can try to get unstuck from weather related situations.

The comment about the president discussing the horrible financial situation that some providers are in is relevant. Some are really good at managing the business end of things and some could use some work, or are in a poor area.

As a former provider who went back to work and listened to the stories of single mothers. It is and can be a sad situation for them. I talked to some of those mothers and discussed some of the programs that are available to them to help them out financially and they were very thankful for the information. They did not know that the programs existed. Even with the state assistance single parents are still paying what they believe is too much for childcare. I don't really know the budgets that these single parents are trying to live on but I can tell you that providers need to earn a living and be able to pay for the expenses of running a childcare and their own living expenses. This is an issue. Parents with multiple younger children also have financial issues paying for childcare as well. Providers who give too many breaks have financial issues as well.

Providers need to be able to have money to cover extra unseen expenses that happen in childcares as well. Broken items, damaged items, bedbugs, headlice, replacement flooring, repairing damaged walls, etc.
Reply With Quote
  #127  
Old 02-08-2017, 08:56 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Thumbs up

$1,500 a month profit! WOW....I need to change jobs. I'd be dancing all the way to the bank if I could, after all expenses....place $1500/month in a savings account.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Seriously, it baffles me that parents can be this silly. When your child goes to school (if private), you pay for the month. You don't ask for a prorated rate if your child is out for a week with the flu. The expenses of the school DO NOT CHANGE because your child isn't there. The only way a school OR daycare center (whether in a home or not) can operate is to have a minimum number of children they service/enroll and have them pay a specified number of days throughout the year. My staff gets paid for any days that we are closed that has nothing to do with them, as long as parents are paying in full. So, for the woman that worked in a center, be careful, you can only speak for yourself. Daycares are National and how staff is treated is going to vary. To hear someone say costs are "minimal" is almost like a slap in the face. Is your provider driving a Mercedes? Live in a mansion maybe? I bet not! LOL Seriously - only people that have NO IDEA about running a business and the work that goes into being a provider and the amount of money it actually costs get all bent out of shape! Only those that see us as "babysitters" instead of what we really are - preschool that are ALL DAY! Many months we're lucky to make $1,500 a month profit! I bet you make more than that! If your provider takes good care of your child (many for 9 and 10 and 11 hours a day!!) and your child is happy and healthy and learning...paying for a few snow days so that they can take the precaution of keeping everyone safe...well that's the least you can do. Otherwise, find a place that's open ALL the time - GOOD LUCK with that!
Reply With Quote
  #128  
Old 02-08-2017, 09:05 AM
Play Care's Avatar
Play Care Play Care is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 6,585
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
$1,500 a month profit! WOW....I need to change jobs. I'd be dancing all the way to the bank if I could, after all expenses....place $1500/month in a savings account.
Wow! You have low standards!

That "profit" probably goes into things like retirement, and college. You know, so you're not eating cat food in your golden years.
Reply With Quote
  #129  
Old 02-08-2017, 09:17 AM
daycarediva's Avatar
daycarediva daycarediva is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 10,810
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
$1,500 a month profit! WOW....I need to change jobs. I'd be dancing all the way to the bank if I could, after all expenses....place $1500/month in a savings account.
Uh, no. 1,500/ month profit after CHILD CARE EXPENSES (food, insurance, supplies) that would be a person's entire monthly salary. Not their SAVINGS.


1,500 is povery level here, it wouldn't even pay the mortgage on my modest home. "Dancing all the way to the bank" hardly.
Reply With Quote
  #130  
Old 02-08-2017, 09:18 AM
Mike's Avatar
Mike Mike is online now
starting daycare some day
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Canada
Posts: 2,016
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Play Care View Post
Wow! You have low standards!

That "profit" probably goes into things like retirement, and college. You know, so you're not eating cat food in your golden years.
Old thread, but ya, I'm in my 50's and nothing saved up yet, so I just might be eating cat food when I retire.
__________________
Children are little angels, even when they are little devils.
They are also our future.
Reply With Quote
  #131  
Old 02-08-2017, 09:26 AM
Leigh's Avatar
Leigh Leigh is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,563
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by daycarediva View Post
Uh, no. 1,500/ month profit after CHILD CARE EXPENSES (food, insurance, supplies) that would be a person's entire monthly salary. Not their SAVINGS.


1,500 is povery level here, it wouldn't even pay the mortgage on my modest home. "Dancing all the way to the bank" hardly.
Exactly. That profit pays for the portion of my mortgage that daycare doesn't cover, my family's groceries and medical expenses, clothing, gas, entertainment (HA! as if there is time for that!), school expenses, school transportation, utilities that daycare doesn't cover, car payment, insurance, etc. etc. That's salary. Anything that would be left could be saved, but no one making $1500 a month profit has money left to save.
Reply With Quote
  #132  
Old 02-12-2017, 04:16 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Seriously, it baffles me that parents can be this silly. When your child goes to school (if private), you pay for the month. You don't ask for a prorated rate if your child is out for a week with the flu. The expenses of the school DO NOT CHANGE because your child isn't there. The only way a school OR daycare center (whether in a home or not) can operate is to have a minimum number of children they service/enroll and have them pay a specified number of days throughout the year. My staff gets paid for any days that we are closed that has nothing to do with them, as long as parents are paying in full. So, for the woman that worked in a center, be careful, you can only speak for yourself. Daycares are National and how staff is treated is going to vary. To hear someone say costs are "minimal" is almost like a slap in the face. Is your provider driving a Mercedes? Live in a mansion maybe? I bet not! LOL Seriously - only people that have NO IDEA about running a business and the work that goes into being a provider and the amount of money it actually costs get all bent out of shape! Only those that see us as "babysitters" instead of what we really are - preschool that are ALL DAY! Many months we're lucky to make $1,500 a month profit! I bet you make more than that! If your provider takes good care of your child (many for 9 and 10 and 11 hours a day!!) and your child is happy and healthy and learning...paying for a few snow days so that they can take the precaution of keeping everyone safe...well that's the least you can do. Otherwise, find a place that's open ALL the time - GOOD LUCK with that!
You might have a different attitude if you were the one that had to take a day off from work to stay home. Don't act like there aren't situations that aren't fair on both ends. My daycare provider just took three weeks off for maternity leave. A week before that she took her 2nd "paid vacation" of the year. We get two weeks "off" where we don't have to pay but who gets FOUR weeks of vacation every year!? So we have to take our week off when she takes hers.. there unfair advantages and disadvantages on both ends... but just because her town has a snow day doesn't mean someone's boss doesn't expect them to be at work
Reply With Quote
  #133  
Old 02-13-2017, 06:39 AM
Blackcat31's Avatar
Blackcat31 Blackcat31 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 15,681
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
You might have a different attitude if you were the one that had to take a day off from work to stay home. Don't act like there aren't situations that aren't fair on both ends. My daycare provider just took three weeks off for maternity leave. A week before that she took her 2nd "paid vacation" of the year. We get two weeks "off" where we don't have to pay but who gets FOUR weeks of vacation every year!? So we have to take our week off when she takes hers.. there unfair advantages and disadvantages on both ends... but just because her town has a snow day doesn't mean someone's boss doesn't expect them to be at work
Sounds like your provider has a great thing going!

It wouldn't be so successful if she couldn't get clients to agree but apparently she doesn't have that problem because you signed on and agreed to her having 4 week of vacation so that's on you not her.
Reply With Quote
  #134  
Old 02-13-2017, 06:57 AM
Play Care's Avatar
Play Care Play Care is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 6,585
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
You might have a different attitude if you were the one that had to take a day off from work to stay home. Don't act like there aren't situations that aren't fair on both ends. My daycare provider just took three weeks off for maternity leave. A week before that she took her 2nd "paid vacation" of the year. We get two weeks "off" where we don't have to pay but who gets FOUR weeks of vacation every year!? So we have to take our week off when she takes hers.. there unfair advantages and disadvantages on both ends... but just because her town has a snow day doesn't mean someone's boss doesn't expect them to be at work
As a parent it wouldn't work for me if I had to find alternate care 4 weeks each year. I would pay more for the reliability of a good small center rather than deal with the stress of that much time off.
As a provider I tell people upfront I'm on a modified school calendar schedule. I've even declined potential clients who want to come here but I know they'd have an issue with my time off. I'd rather they be mad at not being chosen for a day than deal with attitude every time a week off comes up.
Reply With Quote
  #135  
Old 02-13-2017, 07:13 AM
Leigh's Avatar
Leigh Leigh is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,563
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
You might have a different attitude if you were the one that had to take a day off from work to stay home. Don't act like there aren't situations that aren't fair on both ends. My daycare provider just took three weeks off for maternity leave. A week before that she took her 2nd "paid vacation" of the year. We get two weeks "off" where we don't have to pay but who gets FOUR weeks of vacation every year!? So we have to take our week off when she takes hers.. there unfair advantages and disadvantages on both ends... but just because her town has a snow day doesn't mean someone's boss doesn't expect them to be at work
Four weeks is not at all uncommon. My last job before daycare gave me 12 holidays, 6 weeks' vacation, personal days, and basically unlimited sick leave (I had a balance of over 2000 hours of sick leave when I left).

I HAVE been the one to take the day off and stay home when my daycare was closed. I didn't resent her for needing vacation (everyone does) or taking a sick day for her kids. I knew that part of having kids was taking care of them when their daycare could not. I never argued about paying-I agree that everyone deserves paid time off. I actually bothered her about raising her rates because I didn't think she was charging enough, and often gave her gift cards to use for daycare supplies because I felt guilty that I wasn't paying her enough.
Reply With Quote
  #136  
Old 02-13-2017, 08:05 AM
Fiddlesticks's Avatar
Fiddlesticks Fiddlesticks is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 162
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
You might have a different attitude if you were the one that had to take a day off from work to stay home. Don't act like there aren't situations that aren't fair on both ends. My daycare provider just took three weeks off for maternity leave. A week before that she took her 2nd "paid vacation" of the year. We get two weeks "off" where we don't have to pay but who gets FOUR weeks of vacation every year!? So we have to take our week off when she takes hers.. there unfair advantages and disadvantages on both ends... but just because her town has a snow day doesn't mean someone's boss doesn't expect them to be at work
She took three weeks for maternity leave? Consider yourself lucky, I myself took 12 weeks with each of my children, and I encourage all providers to never take less than 6 weeks. I didn't have the parents pay me for the full 12 weeks, but I did raise my rates prior to the maternity leave to cover the loss, so they effectively paid for it... Every year I am closed of 12 paid days, and 30 unpaid days (again, I charge a higher fee to cover these days, I feel they are paid, the parents feel good about not paying at the time.) which equals 8 weeks and 2 days closed per year. Would you feel better if your provider did not charge you for days she was closed, but instead raised your rates $5/day and did not give you two weeks off that you did not have to pay for? That is what I encourage all providers to do to end this constant bickering.
Reply With Quote
  #137  
Old 02-13-2017, 08:07 AM
Snowmom's Avatar
Snowmom Snowmom is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 956
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
You might have a different attitude if you were the one that had to take a day off from work to stay home. Don't act like there aren't situations that aren't fair on both ends. My daycare provider just took three weeks off for maternity leave. A week before that she took her 2nd "paid vacation" of the year. We get two weeks "off" where we don't have to pay but who gets FOUR weeks of vacation every year!? So we have to take our week off when she takes hers.. there unfair advantages and disadvantages on both ends... but just because her town has a snow day doesn't mean someone's boss doesn't expect them to be at work
3 weeks for maternity leave is not all that much! Pretty sure you knew she was pregnant and going to take that time off, right?

So, she gets 2 weeks paid vacation a year? And gives you two weeks free time too? Is that what I'm reading?
That sounds like a nice set up for both of you IMHO.
Reply With Quote
  #138  
Old 02-13-2017, 10:18 AM
Jupadia's Avatar
Jupadia Jupadia is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Canada
Posts: 395
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
You might have a different attitude if you were the one that had to take a day off from work to stay home. Don't act like there aren't situations that aren't fair on both ends. My daycare provider just took three weeks off for maternity leave. A week before that she took her 2nd "paid vacation" of the year. We get two weeks "off" where we don't have to pay but who gets FOUR weeks of vacation every year!? So we have to take our week off when she takes hers.. there unfair advantages and disadvantages on both ends... but just because her town has a snow day doesn't mean someone's boss doesn't expect them to be at work
So in total she took 4 weeks to have a baby. 2 or 3 of which were paid for. In addition she took a week off earlier in the year that was paid for. Or 4 total for the year. Im not quite sure. We'll good for her to be able to do that . It must be in your contract for her to be able to charge you so you knew about this. Also I'm sure she did not just spring the hole I'm having a baby to you at 9 months along so you knew it would be coming. It sucks to line up your vacation with your provider but that's a fall back to home care if you don't arrange backup care. But I doubt she takes 4 weeks each year so in the end your complaining about nothing.
Reply With Quote
  #139  
Old 03-05-2017, 10:11 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Smile You subscribed to the unfair, uncontested system in already in place

Apparently, this is how it has been for some time, but no one told me that having a child would mean that my life and career would be held hostage by the school calendar and daycare hours. Now, I TELL EVERYONE. Usually, I am the FIRST person to tell the young and child-free about the trappings of parenthood--because everyone else chooses to repeat cliches about the 'joy' and 'rewards', so as to appear completely in love with their kid. After all, everyone seems fine with it.

Or are they? Maybe they too are venting and waiting for these years to pass, instead of picketing, protesting and trying to change the state law that is the cause. SO MANY that came before us had the same problem and didn't address it. Now the problem is mine and yours, and it will be you children's struggle too if they become parents. Don't be mistaken--the shoulder-shrugging childcare providers participating in the discussion, they KNOW they have you by the b@#%s.

The whole city is at work. Your boss is at work. The boss expects YOU to be at work. But your child's school or daycare provider is closing its doors and leaving you in a lurch [and counting the cash drawer]. You may be able to work from home depending on your job; you make be able to take the kid to the Y, the JCC schools out, or an hourly service like KidsPlay (also at work on a snow day) depending on your income; or you may stay at home and lose a sick/vacation day or lose money.

I raised hell at my day care OFTEN. I also made up my time at work little by little. I stayed late. So, they stayed late with my child over and over and OVER. Yep, I paid late fees because I could afford to. The look in their eyes when I came for pick up, tells me they didn't want the money--they wanted their time back and they did not want the inconvenience.

Hmm. Well, imagine that.
Reply With Quote
  #140  
Old 03-05-2017, 10:51 PM
unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I want to add that when I first started working longer hours to make up time (drop off at the earliest time and pick him up at the latest time). They tried to claim they would keep him only 8 hours daily due to state law. I called bulls#%* on that right away. I insisted that a) I work 8 hours, b) I commute 30 minute each way, YOU ARE GONNA DO 9 AT MININUM. No argument after that. If there was really such a state regulation, would that have done it?

I mean really, I worked through lunch every day! If I had an 45 min or 1 hour commute, were they gonna insist I change jobs? They were already killing my career when they closed. Now they wanted to decide how much value I got out of it when they opened. No way. Take the money. Do your job!

Perhaps this 8 hour argument applies to folks whose childcare is subsidized? Does anyone know?
Reply With Quote
  #141  
Old 03-06-2017, 08:32 AM
Silly Songs's Avatar
Silly Songs Silly Songs is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 645
Default

Most centers are open 11 or 12 hours a day. If you think your provider is sticking it to you , there are others out there. Research and you will find something
Reply With Quote
  #142  
Old 03-06-2017, 09:46 AM
daycarediva's Avatar
daycarediva daycarediva is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 10,810
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Apparently, this is how it has been for some time, but no one told me that having a child would mean that my life and career would be held hostage by the school calendar and daycare hours. Now, I TELL EVERYONE. Usually, I am the FIRST person to tell the young and child-free about the trappings of parenthood--because everyone else chooses to repeat cliches about the 'joy' and 'rewards', so as to appear completely in love with their kid. After all, everyone seems fine with it.

Or are they? Maybe they too are venting and waiting for these years to pass, instead of picketing, protesting and trying to change the state law that is the cause. SO MANY that came before us had the same problem and didn't address it. Now the problem is mine and yours, and it will be you children's struggle too if they become parents. Don't be mistaken--the shoulder-shrugging childcare providers participating in the discussion, they KNOW they have you by the b@#%s.

The whole city is at work. Your boss is at work. The boss expects YOU to be at work. But your child's school or daycare provider is closing its doors and leaving you in a lurch [and counting the cash drawer]. You may be able to work from home depending on your job; you make be able to take the kid to the Y, the JCC schools out, or an hourly service like KidsPlay (also at work on a snow day) depending on your income; or you may stay at home and lose a sick/vacation day or lose money.

I raised hell at my day care OFTEN. I also made up my time at work little by little. I stayed late. So, they stayed late with my child over and over and OVER. Yep, I paid late fees because I could afford to. The look in their eyes when I came for pick up, tells me they didn't want the money--they wanted their time back and they did not want the inconvenience.

Hmm. Well, imagine that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by unregistered View Post
I want to add that when I first started working longer hours to make up time (drop off at the earliest time and pick him up at the latest time). They tried to claim they would keep him only 8 hours daily due to state law. I called bulls#%* on that right away. I insisted that a) I work 8 hours, b) I commute 30 minute each way, YOU ARE GONNA DO 9 AT MININUM. No argument after that. If there was really such a state regulation, would that have done it?

I mean really, I worked through lunch every day! If I had an 45 min or 1 hour commute, were they gonna insist I change jobs? They were already killing my career when they closed. Now they wanted to decide how much value I got out of it when they opened. No way. Take the money. Do your job!

Perhaps this 8 hour argument applies to folks whose childcare is subsidized? Does anyone know?
What a horrible, hate filled example you are setting. If you could afford late fees (mine are $1/minute), HIRE A NANNY.

Also, what kind of parent leaves their child open- close M-F? I only enroll parents who value time spent with their child. The parent who goes in latest drops off, and the parent who gets out earliest pick up. The average time spent in child care for MY group is 7-8 hours, MAX.

Providers aren't 'holding you hostage', and they certainly aren't rolling in the cash. Find a different provider. MANY do not close for snow days. MANY are open 6-6 for parents like YOU. The center workers you kept late are paid minimum wage. They can barely pay their bills and are doing an exceptional job of caring for YOUR child every single day in your absence. THAT is what you PAY for.

If you value career over 'the look in your CHILD'S eyes' when he/she is the last child picked up and the first dropped off, then maybe you should not have had children.
Reply With Quote
  #143  
Old 03-06-2017, 09:51 AM
Blackcat31's Avatar
Blackcat31 Blackcat31 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 15,681
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by daycarediva View Post
What a horrible, hate filled example you are setting. If you could afford late fees (mine are $1/minute), HIRE A NANNY.

Also, what kind of parent leaves their child open- close M-F? I only enroll parents who value time spent with their child. The parent who goes in latest drops off, and the parent who gets out earliest pick up. The average time spent in child care for MY group is 7-8 hours, MAX.

Providers aren't 'holding you hostage', and they certainly aren't rolling in the cash. Find a different provider. MANY do not close for snow days. MANY are open 6-6 for parents like YOU. The center workers you kept late are paid minimum wage. They can barely pay their bills and are doing an exceptional job of caring for YOUR child every single day in your absence. THAT is what you PAY for.

If you value career over 'the look in your CHILD'S eyes' when he/she is the last child picked up and the first dropped off, then maybe you should not have had children.


The whole time I am reading the Unreg's post my heart broke for their child. I hope their child never comes across this forum and reads the words posted. How heartbreaking to think your own parent feels that way....
Reply With Quote
  #144  
Old 03-06-2017, 10:16 AM
daycarediva's Avatar
daycarediva daycarediva is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 10,810
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post


The whole time I am reading the Unreg's post my heart broke for their child. I hope their child never comes across this forum and reads the words posted. How heartbreaking to think your own parent feels that way....
Yes, exactly. That poor child, don't have kids if you're leaving them for the majority of their waking hours to be raised by people you obviously despise and are trying to 'stick it to'.
Reply With Quote
  #145  
Old 03-06-2017, 10:39 AM
Josiegirl's Avatar
Josiegirl Josiegirl is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Right here
Posts: 8,098
Default

I agree 100% with BC and dcdiva!! When we started our family, we made choices that were best for the FAMILY, including our children. We were never well off enough to afford luxurious vacations, 2 cars, all the latest doodads, manis/pedis, etc., etc. But one of us wanted to always be the one with our own kids......enter me doing dc. Good grief, childhood is but a brief brush of time in a child's life; parents should do what they can to spend some if not most of it with them. Soon that child will be in K, then middle school and we all know we're nothing more than an embarrassing zit in their life by that time. Soon you're watching them graduate from college, if you're extremely lucky, and then they move 3000 miles away, if you're not.
A child is a gift. If you choose to send them to a dc, every parent should do their utmost best to show that overworked/underpaid provider just how special and appreciated they are!! How much they respect what their provider does, day in/day out. It's a thankless job, exhausting, pays little and providers spend a lot on other people's kids. It takes time and attention away from their own kids because a provider's child has to share said provider, home, energy, and by the time the day is done, that provider is darn lucky to have enough energy left for her own family. Why does a parent quibble over having to pay for a day off? You should be grateful you have an awesome provider!! If one of my dcfs ever gave me heat like some of these ungrateful parents have, they'd get their 2 weeks asap.
This really angers me. Some of these parents and the way they feel like their providers are such a dispensable commodity in their child's life. MY LIFE MY CAREER. Ya know what?? Once you CHOOSE to have a child, YOUR LIFE is shared with a totally dependent little being who you are supposed to love and protect with all your heart. Any mature person KNOWS having a baby will change you, change the family unit, change your priorities(Or it should!) Those MEMEME moments you've been enjoying kidless??? You won't get to enjoy them wholeheartedly again until they move away. Then you better hope they don't move 3000 miles away because you'll never ever get these young years back again.
Reply With Quote
  #146  
Old 03-06-2017, 10:42 AM
Play Care's Avatar
Play Care Play Care is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 6,585
Default

When I read it I hoped the poster was trolling because I also felt so bad for their child.
How awful for your child to know that they are such an inconvenience to you.

Is there anyway to lock this thread so people can search/read but no longer post? It seems that nothing new is offered and it's just attracting trolls
Reply With Quote
  #147  
Old 03-06-2017, 10:51 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Anyone else picturing this mom being too inconvenient to visit once she is in a nursing home one day?
Reply With Quote
  #148  
Old 03-06-2017, 12:29 PM
mommyneedsadayoff's Avatar
mommyneedsadayoff mommyneedsadayoff is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 1,545
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Apparently, this is how it has been for some time, but no one told me that having a child would mean that my life and career would be held hostage by the school calendar and daycare hours. Now, I TELL EVERYONE. Usually, I am the FIRST person to tell the young and child-free about the trappings of parenthood--because everyone else chooses to repeat cliches about the 'joy' and 'rewards', so as to appear completely in love with their kid. After all, everyone seems fine with it.

Or are they? Maybe they too are venting and waiting for these years to pass, instead of picketing, protesting and trying to change the state law that is the cause. SO MANY that came before us had the same problem and didn't address it. Now the problem is mine and yours, and it will be you children's struggle too if they become parents. Don't be mistaken--the shoulder-shrugging childcare providers participating in the discussion, they KNOW they have you by the b@#%s.

The whole city is at work. Your boss is at work. The boss expects YOU to be at work. But your child's school or daycare provider is closing its doors and leaving you in a lurch [and counting the cash drawer]. You may be able to work from home depending on your job; you make be able to take the kid to the Y, the JCC schools out, or an hourly service like KidsPlay (also at work on a snow day) depending on your income; or you may stay at home and lose a sick/vacation day or lose money.

I raised hell at my day care OFTEN. I also made up my time at work little by little. I stayed late. So, they stayed late with my child over and over and OVER. Yep, I paid late fees because I could afford to. The look in their eyes when I came for pick up, tells me they didn't want the money--they wanted their time back and they did not want the inconvenience.

Hmm. Well, imagine that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by unregistered View Post
I want to add that when I first started working longer hours to make up time (drop off at the earliest time and pick him up at the latest time). They tried to claim they would keep him only 8 hours daily due to state law. I called bulls#%* on that right away. I insisted that a) I work 8 hours, b) I commute 30 minute each way, YOU ARE GONNA DO 9 AT MININUM. No argument after that. If there was really such a state regulation, would that have done it?

I mean really, I worked through lunch every day! If I had an 45 min or 1 hour commute, were they gonna insist I change jobs? They were already killing my career when they closed. Now they wanted to decide how much value I got out of it when they opened. No way. Take the money. Do your job!

Perhaps this 8 hour argument applies to folks whose childcare is subsidized? Does anyone know?
So sad and misguided I can only hope you are super young and have time to grow and mature. I wish it had happened prior to you having a child, but here we are. Hopefully they will learn from the child hood you have provided, that spending more time with each other far outweighs a career or anything, really, and do better for their own children. If we are lucky, we learn from our parent's mistakes and see the bigger picture. I hope that happens for them (and you).
Reply With Quote
  #149  
Old 03-06-2017, 12:51 PM
Indoorvoice's Avatar
Indoorvoice Indoorvoice is online now
Advanced Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 818
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Apparently, this is how it has been for some time, but no one told me that having a child would mean that my life and career would be held hostage by the school calendar and daycare hours. Now, I TELL EVERYONE. Usually, I am the FIRST person to tell the young and child-free about the trappings of parenthood--because everyone else chooses to repeat cliches about the 'joy' and 'rewards', so as to appear completely in love with their kid. After all, everyone seems fine with it.

Or are they? Maybe they too are venting and waiting for these years to pass, instead of picketing, protesting and trying to change the state law that is the cause. SO MANY that came before us had the same problem and didn't address it. Now the problem is mine and yours, and it will be you children's struggle too if they become parents. Don't be mistaken--the shoulder-shrugging childcare providers participating in the discussion, they KNOW they have you by the b@#%s.

The whole city is at work. Your boss is at work. The boss expects YOU to be at work. But your child's school or daycare provider is closing its doors and leaving you in a lurch [and counting the cash drawer]. You may be able to work from home depending on your job; you make be able to take the kid to the Y, the JCC schools out, or an hourly service like KidsPlay (also at work on a snow day) depending on your income; or you may stay at home and lose a sick/vacation day or lose money.

I raised hell at my day care OFTEN. I also made up my time at work little by little. I stayed late. So, they stayed late with my child over and over and OVER. Yep, I paid late fees because I could afford to. The look in their eyes when I came for pick up, tells me they didn't want the money--they wanted their time back and they did not want the inconvenience.

Hmm. Well, imagine that.
Hmm. Perhaps the problem isn't daycare, but your job. Pretty heartless that your boss doesn't understand the time it takes for parents to care for their children. Your efforts would be better spent protesting better time off to care for your child and changing the mindset that work is more important than children. Then a snow day wouldn't matter and your poor child wouldn't have to spend open to close in a daycare.
Reply With Quote
  #150  
Old 03-06-2017, 02:26 PM
Rockgirl's Avatar
Rockgirl Rockgirl is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,662
Default

Any parent with a child enrolled in my daycare who "raised hell" or demanded to dictate how many hours a day I would have their child would be looking for new daycare. Like yesterday.
Reply With Quote
  #151  
Old 03-06-2017, 02:57 PM
LysesKids's Avatar
LysesKids LysesKids is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 2,342
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockgirl View Post
Any parent with a child enrolled in my daycare who "raised hell" or demanded to dictate how many hours a day I would have their child would be looking for new daycare. Like yesterday.
THIS... I run a small business; I offer a service and set the RULES... if the parent doesn't agree to my terms of service they are free to find care elsewhere (and don't let the door hit ya on the way out)

I work long hours and pay taxes just like my clients but I earn much less than all of them... nobody will tell me I MUST do this this or this for pay; not happening. BTW, I do take off 4 weeks every year... unpaid, but still and she's hooting and hollering about not having back-up? Yeah, I never would have signed her in the first place... all my families have a back up plan in place for times I must close even unexpectedly (like illness) and I know what they are before they sign my contract
Reply With Quote
  #152  
Old 03-06-2017, 07:12 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by daycarediva View Post
What a horrible, hate filled example you are setting. If you could afford late fees (mine are $1/minute), HIRE A NANNY.

Also, what kind of parent leaves their child open- close M-F? I only enroll parents who value time spent with their child. The parent who goes in latest drops off, and the parent who gets out earliest pick up. The average time spent in child care for MY group is 7-8 hours, MAX.

Providers aren't 'holding you hostage', and they certainly aren't rolling in the cash. Find a different provider. MANY do not close for snow days. MANY are open 6-6 for parents like YOU. The center workers you kept late are paid minimum wage. They can barely pay their bills and are doing an exceptional job of caring for YOUR child every single day in your absence. THAT is what you PAY for.

If you value career over 'the look in your CHILD'S eyes' when he/she is the last child picked up and the first dropped off, then maybe you should not have had children.
The situation was unacceptable, but YOU all accept it. I work full time and I did not clock in just next door, so this "7-8 hours" that you speak of was not even a possibility. I does not matter of what I do or do not value more. I expect to pay for a service and get it.

I was told, "Sorry we are not providing services today." So, I made up my hours by bringing him in early the rest of the week *during regular hours*. I paid for a full week of service and I got it--despite the snow days by utilizing the fact that they were open from 6 to 6 *that week*. It is a fair solution.

Now, when they bucked at that solution THAT is when I started being equally inconsiderate of their time.
Reply With Quote
  #153  
Old 03-06-2017, 08:00 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Indoorvoice View Post
Hmm. Perhaps the problem isn't daycare, but your job. Pretty heartless that your boss doesn't understand the time it takes for parents to care for their children. Your efforts would be better spent protesting better time off to care for your child and changing the mindset that work is more important than children. Then a snow day wouldn't matter and your poor child wouldn't have to spend open to close in a daycare.
Thank you for responding logically rather than emotionally.

I do agree about the job. I mean, there are some non-essential services that some of us provide and no one will die if a we miss the day or even the deadline.

But there ARE times when the entire city keeps running, but the schools and DCPs just opt-out. If the weather is ACTUALLY dangerous, I find my phone/pc to tell my boss not to count on me--only to find that she has already reached out saying she is not expecting me. Those kinds of weather days are rare. But school and daycare closings are far less rare.

Imagine you are taking your kid home, and the receptionist tells you, "Don't forget, we are closed tomorrow". You ask why and you are told that it is like parent teacher conference day [something]. You look at your 15-month old and wonder, "What on earth does that have to do with this place? Everyone here is 5 and under!"

Yes, I eventually learned expect to numerous days off of the school calendar, but to then have the unscheduled days piled on--I had had enough. I got myself a plan to get what I needed, expected and had paid for.
Reply With Quote
  #154  
Old 03-06-2017, 08:25 PM
LysesKids's Avatar
LysesKids LysesKids is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 2,342
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
The situation was unacceptable, but YOU all accept it. I work full time and I did not clock in just next door, so this "7-8 hours" that you speak of was not even a possibility. I does not matter of what I do or do not value more. I expect to pay for a service and get it.

I was told, "Sorry we are not providing services today." So, I made up my hours by bringing him in early the rest of the week *during regular hours*. I paid for a full week of service and I got it--despite the snow days by utilizing the fact that they were open from 6 to 6 *that week*. It is a fair solution.

Now, when they bucked at that solution THAT is when I started being equally inconsiderate of their time.
I personally contract hours & don't have a set open or closed time - I worked 14-16 hrs daily last year because of 4 different families different needs, however I limited each families contract to 10 hours max (with set times for each family) unless they paid OT (it had to be requested at least 24 hrs in advance). Why? Because I am limited to 4 infants by state law & I will burn out if I am expected to work whatever & whenever without some time off (yes even we get sick sometimes)... this year I am lucky & all my clients work between 7:30a-5pm. I am not a center or an employee... I set my own terms and had you pulled that OT stunt with me, I would have sent you packing that day.

If you truly need care without a day off, hire a Nanny or go to a center since you can afford the fees. Don't take it out on the provider because you might find you can't get care if word gets around on how you treated her or heaven forbid she quits no notice...
Reply With Quote
  #155  
Old 03-06-2017, 09:11 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LysesKids View Post
THIS... I run a small business; I offer a service and set the RULES... if the parent doesn't agree to my terms of service they are free to find care elsewhere (and don't let the door hit ya on the way out)

I work long hours and pay taxes just like my clients but I earn much less than all of them... nobody will tell me I MUST do this this or this for pay; not happening. BTW, I do take off 4 weeks every year... unpaid, but still and she's hooting and hollering about not having back-up? Yeah, I never would have signed her in the first place... all my families have a back up plan in place for times I must close even unexpectedly (like illness) and I know what they are before they sign my contract
LysesKids, I DO NOT disagree with you. You are giving full disclosure and insisting that you cannot be the only support in place. They were a facility, probably not like yours; they had many kids and staff.

When I was completely taken aback the by the first closure, they realized no one gave me a calendar. They got me one and I adjusted my schedule. Then came the one occasion when the calendar clearly said they were open, but they were closed. Everyone who also had a school-age child [whose school calendar was accurate], was not surprised. I, however, was SHOCKED. Then came the snow days... there came a point where I felt like I was the little guy against the bureaucracy (or whatever) and I needed to stand up for myself.

If the only outcome was that they learned operate more like you, great--better for the next parent. I absolutely would have appreciated if they had insisted that I have back up care; I would have been prepared. Seriously, no one told me. At 30, I was the first of my friends to have kids. Even my mom had nothing useful to offer when I told her about the mess....maybe because she raised kids in a different time?

Back to my point, that I agree with you that my response was wrong. but I still feel that my reasoning--how I got there--was not. On THOSE occasions, I was merely asking for four 10-hour days since I wasn't getting five 8-hour days--as that was the situation THEY had put ME in. (They were open 6 to 6). Their response about an 8-hour daily max (not found in their policies btw) showed me reason would get me nowhere and responded with the same lack of consideration.

A business can employ fair practices or not, deal with whom they choose, and take no crap [even as they dish it out] as they run their business, because it is THEIR call. I think in somewhere in there, they knew they were wrong. I am still proud of my creative problem solving and of standing up for myself.
Reply With Quote
  #156  
Old 03-06-2017, 10:42 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyneedsadayoff View Post
So sad and misguided I can only hope you are super young and have time to grow and mature. I wish it had happened prior to you having a child, but here we are. Hopefully they will learn from the child hood you have provided, that spending more time with each other far outweighs a career or anything, really, and do better for their own children. If we are lucky, we learn from our parent's mistakes and see the bigger picture. I hope that happens for them (and you).
I teach him that he must make a full and exciting life, and only add a family if and when he can sustain a dependent AND a full-time nanny (unless things change). I imagine a huge life for him and would never want both his personal and professional life instantly constrained for years on end by the dictates of a DCP/school. It's maddening feeling the days of one's life are decided at someone else's whim.
Reply With Quote
  #157  
Old 03-07-2017, 03:04 AM
Josiegirl's Avatar
Josiegirl Josiegirl is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Right here
Posts: 8,098
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I teach him that he must make a full and exciting life, and only add a family if and when he can sustain a dependent AND a full-time nanny (unless things change). I imagine a huge life for him and would never want both his personal and professional life instantly constrained for years on end by the dictates of a DCP/school. It's maddening feeling the days of one's life are decided at someone else's whim.
Are you still at the same center? Surely there are other more reliable options nearby? I operate a small registered home daycare and am open 7-5, with very few days off. And the days off come with a notice, unless I'm sick or there's a death in the family. Plus, if I did have to close unexpectedly, I have stressed in my handbook of policies how important it is to have back up in place. It might benefit you to find a more flexible child care, a place that doesn't need parent/teacher conferences(unless you're talking about a regular school situation and not a center??). I have never limited anyone's hours to 8 or 9, etc. When they sign on, they, themselves, enter the times they need. Anything above and beyond that is overtime.
You may be in a tough position but you also have choices. *You can choose another provider.
What made me angry was not abiding by the rules set forth by your child care but taking it upon yourself to do what you needed to do anyways. Doing that, you're most likely not their favorite client of all time. Unless I'm reading it all wrong which I've been known to do. Having a provider/parent relationship is an important part of using childcare and it's based on trust and mutual respect. Definitely sounds like none of that is going on.
Reply With Quote
  #158  
Old 03-07-2017, 03:06 AM
Josiegirl's Avatar
Josiegirl Josiegirl is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Right here
Posts: 8,098
Default

Oh and the days of everyone's lives are sometimes decided on a whim. You're not alone on that.
Reply With Quote
  #159  
Old 03-07-2017, 03:51 AM
LysesKids's Avatar
LysesKids LysesKids is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 2,342
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
LysesKids, I DO NOT disagree with you. You are giving full disclosure and insisting that you cannot be the only support in place. They were a facility, probably not like yours; they had many kids and staff.

When I was completely taken aback the by the first closure, they realized no one gave me a calendar. They got me one and I adjusted my schedule. Then came the one occasion when the calendar clearly said they were open, but they were closed. Everyone who also had a school-age child [whose school calendar was accurate], was not surprised. I, however, was SHOCKED. Then came the snow days... there came a point where I felt like I was the little guy against the bureaucracy (or whatever) and I needed to stand up for myself.

If the only outcome was that they learned operate more like you, great--better for the next parent. I absolutely would have appreciated if they had insisted that I have back up care; I would have been prepared. Seriously, no one told me. At 30, I was the first of my friends to have kids. Even my mom had nothing useful to offer when I told her about the mess....maybe because she raised kids in a different time?

Back to my point, that I agree with you that my response was wrong. but I still feel that my reasoning--how I got there--was not. On THOSE occasions, I was merely asking for four 10-hour days since I wasn't getting five 8-hour days--as that was the situation THEY had put ME in. (They were open 6 to 6). Their response about an 8-hour daily max (not found in their policies btw) showed me reason would get me nowhere and responded with the same lack of consideration.

A business can employ fair practices or not, deal with whom they choose, and take no crap [even as they dish it out] as they run their business, because it is THEIR call. I think in somewhere in there, they knew they were wrong. I am still proud of my creative problem solving and of standing up for myself.
I see where you are coming from & unless they had you contracted for certain hrs (like I do), then if they are open 6-6 that's on them for trying to change the rules... I personally would have started looking elsewhere for other care too (I was a corporate person for years when my kids were little)

I always have my vacation weeks & 6 federal holidays listed out the first week in January on my website, posted by the front door & every family gets a copy lol. I don't want someone saying, Oh I didn't know you were closed this week, knowing full well they were told 6 months earlier 3 different ways. And it is unpaid leave because I figure they have to pay someone else for back up care.

In the event of severe illness & last minute closings I credit a day back on the next month, so yeah - fair practice & upfront written policies work in my favor (BTW, I am a small home childcare).
Reply With Quote
  #160  
Old 03-07-2017, 09:45 AM
daycarediva's Avatar
daycarediva daycarediva is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 10,810
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
The situation was unacceptable, but YOU all accept it. I work full time and I did not clock in just next door, so this "7-8 hours" that you speak of was not even a possibility. I does not matter of what I do or do not value more. I expect to pay for a service and get it.

I was told, "Sorry we are not providing services today." So, I made up my hours by bringing him in early the rest of the week *during regular hours*. I paid for a full week of service and I got it--despite the snow days by utilizing the fact that they were open from 6 to 6 *that week*. It is a fair solution.

Now, when they bucked at that solution THAT is when I started being equally inconsiderate of their time.
Sounds to me like you had a bad center. There are SO MANY child care options, many do not close for weather (I only do in a state of emergency/my road is closed) , etc. and you should have gone elsewhere instead of being angry and resentful.
Reply With Quote
  #161  
Old 03-07-2017, 10:02 AM
Blackcat31's Avatar
Blackcat31 Blackcat31 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 15,681
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I am still proud of my creative problem solving and of standing up for myself.
.....More like bullying tactics and a severe case of entitlement.
Reply With Quote
  #162  
Old 03-07-2017, 10:26 AM
Josiegirl's Avatar
Josiegirl Josiegirl is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Right here
Posts: 8,098
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
.....More like bullying tactics and a severe case of entitlement.
Reply With Quote
  #163  
Old 03-07-2017, 01:00 PM
Snowmom's Avatar
Snowmom Snowmom is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: USA
Posts: 956
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
.....More like bullying tactics and a severe case of entitlement.
Reply With Quote
  #164  
Old 03-07-2017, 03:00 PM
LysesKids's Avatar
LysesKids LysesKids is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Tennessee
Posts: 2,342
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
.....More like bullying tactics and a severe case of entitlement.
If she had pulled that stunt here... again I will state, don't let the door hit you on the way out; as much as I get the frustration, her way of handling it was wrong and I would terminate immediately. I'm hoping she learns something here that will make her not so entitled in the future... and yes, I had a mom like her 2 years ago; she got booted because of her entitlement attitude & "I'm paying you extra so you will take it" attitude. Hell even my neighbors were glad when she left because she acted like she was so much better than everyone
Reply With Quote
  #165  
Old 03-25-2017, 07:52 AM
MOM OF 4's Avatar
MOM OF 4 MOM OF 4 is offline
Jack of All Trades
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Texas
Posts: 285
Default

Bottom line
If u feel your child is an inconvenience to you, shoulda thought about that BEFORE you had them. Your child belongs to YOU and is not a problem you can pawn off. You signed and agreed to a contract, therefore it's up to YOU to adhere to it without complaint. It is NOT your provider's problem whatever "issue" you have (single mom, have 8 kids, have a low paying job, whatever). It is only your problem to solve. No one is "getting one over on you" or taking from you. In fact, if u really want to be technical, the weekly rates providers get is pennies on the dollar for the MOST IMPORTANT job there is! Time for people to stop acting entitled. U are NOT owed anything in this world.
Reply With Quote
  #166  
Old 01-11-2018, 07:11 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

The fact is... each daycare has their own policies. Wether they are a center or in home does not matter. If they want to charge for snow days that's up to them. They do need to put it in their policies wether or not they will charge for any closed days be it vacation, holiday, sick time, snow days ect. The parents need to read the policies before they sign the contract. If it's not in the policies then you shouldn't be charged, however if it is in the policies then you are responsible for paying the fees. Personally it makes me sick to my stomach when parents are more worried about fees they're paying for childcare rather than the safety of their children. If a school is closed because the roads are bad then why shouldn't a daycare be closed??? Oh that's right...because school is free but you pay for daycare, so since you're paying for daycare they should be open even if the roads are dangerous, right? Give me a break!!! If you don't want to pay for snow days find a daycare that doesn't charge for them, plain and simple.
Reply With Quote
  #167  
Old 02-06-2018, 01:05 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Just following the logic here left by those who feel they shouldn’t have to pay if their daycare is closed for inclement weather....did you go to college? If your college closed due to inclement weather would you expect/demand a refund in tuition? What about private elementary or high schools? Should they refund tuition for snow days? If so, public schools should refund tax payers for snow days? If they do this, they won’t be able to cover operating expenses. All parents of young children need to create a plan to find alternative care for their children in the case of illness or inclement weather. Once your child is school age, they will need care during school vacations, summer, and snow days - regardless of whether they attend private or public school. Child care programs that never close set a bad president for new parents who often have quite a shock factor once their child reaches school age.
Create a plan and spend time with your children whenever you can. Precious memories can be made on snow days with your child!
Reply With Quote
  #168  
Old 02-07-2018, 08:28 PM
BrynleeJean BrynleeJean is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Texas
Posts: 156
Default

Its legal, if thats what you mean.
IDK about fair. check their policy handbook that you signed and you'll find out if its fair. but idk a single daycare in my town that refunds tuition for a weather day.
the idea is that they charge for the spot not the attendance.
Reply With Quote
  #169  
Old 02-08-2018, 09:55 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
First I want to say that I know it's tough for parents to find last minute childcare on days that their providers close and I completely feel your pain. BUT, I think you are being a little unreasonable about this and should realize that you aren't the only person these closures effect.

I live in the northeast too and these are not little snow squalls, but huge storms. This month has seen the most snowfall totals ever recorded for the month of January... historic amounts.... one requiring a state of emergency to be issued. Maybe your commute was clear, but it doesn't mean that the other parents & daycare workers had it that easy. I work in a large preschool and this January, we closed once (blizzard conditions) and have had 4 delayed openings. Out of all those delayed openings, the public schools closed completely. We employees did not receive pay for any time we didn't work (but our dc parents were still obligated to pay per their contracts). I cannot use up "vacation days" because I don't get them w/pay. Vacation & sick days are days we don't earn money. That's pretty common around these parts and we accept this when we take the job.

Some of us have school age children at home. When the public schools close, we either have to stay home (and lose pay) or scramble to find child care ourselves. Because if our employer decides to stay open, we still have to hit those snowcovered roads, risk getting into wrecks and all to get to work to watch YOUR children. We do it if we can and most of us do it for minimum wages. So please don't take it so personally. It isn't just about your losses - these storms have effected everyone. And I will now take the time to give a shout out of thanks to the dc parents that I work for - I'm so grateful that not one of them complained when we closed for the day or had a few delayed openings. Not one.

I don’t understand why every other professional seems to be able to work and get there in bad weather but teachers and daycare providers...not many jobs do I know get paid for doing nothing
Reply With Quote
  #170  
Old 02-08-2018, 09:58 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Just following the logic here left by those who feel they shouldn’t have to pay if their daycare is closed for inclement weather....did you go to college? If your college closed due to inclement weather would you expect/demand a refund in tuition? What about private elementary or high schools? Should they refund tuition for snow days? If so, public schools should refund tax payers for snow days? If they do this, they won’t be able to cover operating expenses. All parents of young children need to create a plan to find alternative care for their children in the case of illness or inclement weather. Once your child is school age, they will need care during school vacations, summer, and snow days - regardless of whether they attend private or public school. Child care programs that never close set a bad president for new parents who often have quite a shock factor once their child reaches school age.
Create a plan and spend time with your children whenever you can. Precious memories can be made on snow days with your child!

You are going to college for an education and a degree to get a job, high/middle school makes up the days they take off... you are paying daycare more than most in state colleges to watch your child so yes yes I do expect that I get my money’s worth like the above mentioned items you idiot
Reply With Quote
  #171  
Old 02-09-2018, 02:45 AM
Josiegirl's Avatar
Josiegirl Josiegirl is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Right here
Posts: 8,098
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
You are going to college for an education and a degree to get a job, high/middle school makes up the days they take off... you are paying daycare more than most in state colleges to watch your child so yes yes I do expect that I get my money’s worth like the above mentioned items you idiot
You're rude. Having a problem making snow day memories with your child? Or just feeling guilty making life all about you or work instead?
Getting your money's worth. Gotta love that mindset. I can see how that would be the most important thing in a person's life. To he!! with the children, huh? Lemme guess, you also take off every vacation day for just you, right? Get your nails done, go to the beach, go shopping, leave child in dc. So you can be a better parent?? A better parent to do what? Send them to dc? These children are CRYING and SCREAMING for attention!! And we wonder why children seem to have more issues in present day than years ago. This is why I chose childcare, to be home with my own kids. It's such a short time in their lives, like a drop in the bucket, but means so much towards their emotional growth, feelings of security, being loved and part of a strong family unit. Like they matter to someone most of all. That's all most children need. Someone's undivided attention, acceptance, someone who truly wants to be with them just to play blocks, get down on the floor and BE with them, read stories. All of this shines through to your child/ren. Makes them feel wanted and loved OR unwanted and merely tolerated.
Quality time does NOT mean throwing them in front of the tv when you're home, or keeping them in dc longer than absolutely needed, or smacking a video in front of their face while driving anywhere, or making FB more important than listening to what you child is saying.
Unreg., maybe you're not one of those parents...I have no clue. BUT there are so many(TOO MANY) who are like that that it's terribly sad and leaves many children with no place they really feel secure and loved.
SMH at parents who have this mindset of getting their last dollars worth.
Reply With Quote
  #172  
Old 02-09-2018, 04:01 AM
amberrose3dg's Avatar
amberrose3dg amberrose3dg is online now
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: somewhere
Posts: 679
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
You are going to college for an education and a degree to get a job, high/middle school makes up the days they take off... you are paying daycare more than most in state colleges to watch your child so yes yes I do expect that I get my money’s worth like the above mentioned items you idiot
Let me tell you something! We have more important things to worry about like the safety of the children in our care. You may not care if you wreck and hurt your child on your way to daycare but we sure do. I have had parents that would bring their children to me in a 2 foot snow storm if it meant them actually spending time with their children. This is why I will close if it is not safe. I also have to worry about an emergency situation like fires, no power an ambulance making it to our location etc...Getting your money's worth says to me you care more about the money spent than actually spending time with your kids. Days off work should be saved for when the children are ill or their is a snow/ice/bad weather day. I see parents take off what equals to weeks for themselves and their kids are still here!
I have been on both sides of this and kept me son home when it snowed even just a little and still had no problems paying daycare. If you do not like it I suggest you stay home and raise your own kids!!!
I bet you be that same parent that would bitch if you were late picking up cause the weather was bad too. You have no problems making it there to drop off. That is another reason providers close. We really feel like having your child overnight cause you paid for it right.
Reply With Quote
  #173  
Old 03-30-2018, 09:18 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Cool

Example you pay for cell phone service every month, whether you have service in every area or not. Before you sign up you find out the coverage area. You still pay for the month....same thing. Fair? Absolutely not, but, I like having a cell phone and those are the rules.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
closed from snow, dayare snow days, daycare center, daycare snow days, dead horse, getting money's worth, handbook, never ending thread, paid time off, paying for no care, real costs of providing care, safety of children, snow day, snow policy, state of emergency, supply fee, tuition breakdown

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How Long Should 4 Year Old Nap Unregistered Daycare Center and Family Home Forum 314 02-13-2018 04:48 AM
Licensed DayCare vs. Private DayCare marylmr Daycare Center and Family Home Forum 45 09-16-2017 07:50 AM
Termination Gone Wrong MsKara Daycare Center and Family Home Forum 107 03-11-2015 02:09 PM
Do I Have To Pay Full Tuition If Child Is Out Sick? md12 Parents and Guardians Forum 54 05-09-2013 10:23 AM
Daycare Parents Handbook DancingQueen Daycare Center and Family Home Forum 24 12-04-2010 12:35 AM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:39 AM.



Daycare.com         Find A Daycare         List Your Daycare         Toys & Products                 About Us

Daycare.com
Please read our Disclaimer before continuing.

Topics pertain mainly to the following States:

Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming