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Old 04-03-2019, 12:30 PM
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Default Quiet Time Activities for School Age Kids

Hello,
Both of the centers I own are going to have a decent number of school age kids for the summer. Since they are in school, some are not going to want to nap. What are some good activities they can do while my littler kids sleep? I am planning on some reading tutoring, dry erase board math problems, etc. Both our centers are large single room buildings with waist high dividers for the classrooms, so I cannot send them into a totally separate room/area where they can be loud. Thanks in advance.
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Old 04-03-2019, 12:36 PM
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Naptime is what, two hours long? They're going to have a VERY challenging time being expected to stay quiet and avoid disturbing nappers during that long of a stretch. I don't think you can expect then to focus on classwork, especially if there's no task lighting. If the lighting is dim because of naptime, it'll strain their eyes to be given reading and math work.

Even if you cycle them through several different activities (art, quiet time with books, math instruction, etc.), keeping everybody down to a murmur isn't a reasonable expectation for two hours.

It's also been my experience that older kids HATE being around younger kids who are napping or being restful during naptime. There's always a kid or two who just has to shout, to try to wake the little ones up for their own entertainment. Maybe that's different in a center, with more kids and more adults, but in a family daycare, nappers and non-nappers together is a recipe for chaos and no naps.
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Old 04-03-2019, 12:55 PM
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Both centers have areas that I can turn on more lights for them to work more school appropriate work. The centers are 21 kids in one and 30 in the other... so not home daycare centers. I do not expect total quiet, just activities to keep the noise level down some on days they cannot go outside and play while the smaller kids nap. One day we will have a separate building for older kids (4 and up) so they do not have to be in the same building with the littles but not yet!
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Old 04-03-2019, 01:14 PM
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Ideally, I would have one center in the summer months for school aged/non-nappers and one for the under school aged crowd.

But since that probably isn't do-able so what I would do is have quiet time. A movie, audio books (with headphones) and/or books to read. If they show you (unwanted behavior) they are unable to participate in any of those activities then I would have them nap/rest.
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Old 04-03-2019, 01:20 PM
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I can't believe I am going to say this but I'd consider letting them bring their handhelds and earphones with your setup. Kindles preferred. I would not do a lot of school work during summer as they already get enough of that and the resistance and attitude will be huge.

Most centers here bus the big kids out for a large portion of each day. City pool, movie theatre, state parks, museums, skating rinks, etc. If the kid misses the bus in the morning, the kid cannot attend. Permission slips and spending money is also required.
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Old 04-03-2019, 01:44 PM
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Never thought of the tablet/ headphones idea but that is great! I know that the main school for one of our centers is letting school out for the summer April 30th and not resuming until mid-September due to construction on the Elementary school. So I have 5 or 6 school kids that are going to be there daily for several months (pray for us!!!). I want to offer school work to help keep them fresh and going over the summer (Teachers love this idea since is it going to be such a long gap and are putting together things for the kids to work on...... perks of living in a small town and working closely with the school). I just want to try to make this as pleasant as possible for teachers and kids alike. The tablet time might be just the answer to get us through the nap time issues.
Thank you!!!!
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Old 04-03-2019, 03:42 PM
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Get them journals to fill in during the summer.

What about those adult coloring books with colored pencils? (Gasp****yes coloring books)

Collect all those recyclables and weird shaped throw away stuff that nobody knows what to do with. After you amass a collection(ask for parents help too), put all that stuff, along with tape, glue, scissors, markers, etc., and let the kids be inventors and create whatever their brains can imagine.

Back when Beanie Babies were all the rage, I offered a contest for all the kiddos, to read. They could read at dc or if they read at home with parents, the parents had to sign off that their child had indeed read what they said they did. Then, depending on the books, ages of kids, reading levels, etc., they were able to earn Beanie Babies. One little guy entering K that fall jumped a couple reading levels and earned himself a few of those stuffed animals. You can modify the whole thing to what you felt was acceptable.

Buy a few old game boards at yard sales and have the kids use the back to create new games.

Fairy Houses. That's always been a favorite with any SA dcks I've had. I had a dcb who was maybe 7-8 at the time. I got a box, brought in a collection of nature items, added some shells, glass stones, just about anything. He redid it so many times; he loved it. Kept him occupied and quiet.
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Old 04-03-2019, 05:34 PM
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I tried to keep a school aged daycare kid happy and entertained one year during the Summer and it was a dismal failure. (This was in my first year of doing daycare). So I decided that if I ever had a SA kid again, I would treat them the same that I had found I needed to treat my oldest during school breaks, back when I was a SAHM.

My son always had fun the first three weeks of Summer, then he turned into a whiny pain in the neck, every. single. year. In the end, I learned that he needed to do some chores everyday, so that he was more grateful for his free time and for the outings we planned.

I currently have two SA dck who I have watched since they were 2 yo and now they are almost 7 and are still coming here during school breaks. They are just a bit younger than my daughter, and they are all friends, and they really enjoy each other. But the reality is that my daycare is not designed for SA kids, and occasionally they claim that they are bored. But I tell them that if they are bored then they can do a chore for me. I also have them do some kinda fun academic lessons each day. I feel like having some scheduled lesson time and also the chores helps them to keep their perspective.

I was open with the parents about the arrangement and they understand and appreciate it.
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Old 04-04-2019, 06:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josiegirl View Post

What about those adult coloring books with colored pencils? (Gasp****yes coloring books)
Color books at that age ARE developmentally appropriate.
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Old 04-05-2019, 05:18 AM
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Journals are a great idea for kids that can write. They can draw a picture and then write a story about it.

Kids who canít write yet can use their journal as a book to color or draw.

Jigsaw puzzles are great as well.
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