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  #1  
Old 11-21-2013, 08:29 AM
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Default Food Program - What?!

I just got on the food program and I'm just not liking it.

I've been reading a lot about milk and so have my DCP. We all agree on whole milk being the safest choice.... Food program lady calls and says no. Don't do that. I serve pomegranates and they're not on the claiming list... she says, don't serve.

I do not like being told to serve certain things. I'm not happy with this program. I am running a very small in home care program and I have been told/read in my handbook for food program... no wild caught food.... no home grown food.... you must do this this this... etc.

Am I the only person who thinks it is not worth it? I'm about to quit and raise prices or ask for some things to be provided... idk.
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Old 11-21-2013, 08:38 AM
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You can serve things not on the list, you just can't CLAIM them. If you choose to serve Pomegranates, just make sure that you serve something else on the approved list, as well (maybe fruit juice).

As far as whole milk goes, all recommendations I have heard from our nutritionist and doctor that 1% is what is now recommended.
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Old 11-21-2013, 08:44 AM
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I don't take it that seriously. Pomegranate is on my list though so not sure why that would vary. I have an option for fruit salad it veggie plate or mixed veggies so if it's not on the list I do that option. We also serve only whole milk here and my FP rep has never asked. Plus, even if it's not on there, as long as it's not a day that your rep is there for an announced visit does it really matter it they have Pomegranate instead of pears?
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Old 11-21-2013, 08:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Leigh View Post
You can serve things not on the list, you just can't CLAIM them. If you choose to serve Pomegranates, just make sure that you serve something else on the approved list, as well (maybe fruit juice).

As far as whole milk goes, all recommendations I have heard from our nutritionist and doctor that 1% is what is now recommended.
Yes due to the increase in obesity they have recommended 1% but for children under 2 it's whole milk. Some lines of nutritional thinking recommend whole milk over low/nonfat.
http://www.care2.com/greenliving/why...st-choice.html
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Old 11-21-2013, 09:41 AM
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Pomegranates aren't on my list either. Perhaps they don't have enough nutritional value to qualify? Or is too hard to measure? Venison is and I would assume in most cases that is wild caught food. I serve veggies from my garden during the summer time. Haven't heard the no wild/no home grown rule. We serve whole milk until the age of two and then skim after that.
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Old 11-21-2013, 09:46 AM
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Pomegranates aren't on my list either. Perhaps they don't have enough nutritional value to qualify? Or is too hard to measure? Venison is and I would assume in most cases that is wild caught food. I serve veggies from my garden during the summer time. Haven't heard the no wild/no home grown rule. We serve whole milk until the age of two and then skim after that.
The wild game rule in my area, is because meats are required to be inspected, processed and packaged by an approved facility. I assume one that follows the health and safety rules of the usda food guidlines.
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Old 11-21-2013, 09:54 AM
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veggies home grown are fine but not canned you can freeze though.. BUT it could be your town not the FP some towns anyone that cooks must take a class a serve safe class. AnD those rules for resterants says no food from farmers markets because if there was a problem like the ecoli in the spinach who do they go after????

But the FP encourages fresh produce from the garden just not wild game. Whole up to age 2 then 1% or lower. But most kids get enough fat in their diet anyway.
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Old 11-21-2013, 09:56 AM
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to count as a serving of fruit it has to be 1/4 cup and with the seed I would assume it would be 1/2 cup It is unlikely each child would eat or you would prepare a whole pomegranet per child. Yes serve them they are wonderful but as part of a fruit salad or and extra
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Old 11-21-2013, 10:08 AM
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The wild game rule in my area, is because meats are required to be inspected, processed and packaged by an approved facility. I assume one that follows the health and safety rules of the usda food guidlines.
I serve wild game - venison. My husband shoots it and takes it to the locker to be processed. If just us are eating it, he can do all the processing on his own but then it can't be claimed on the food program if I were to serve it to the dcks.

And I grow and serve the majority of our vegetables. I freeze everything I can and serve it through the winter months. (I also home can a lot of my produce, but I'm not allowed to serve this to the dcks.)
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Old 11-21-2013, 11:45 AM
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I'm on the food program too, and there are things I don't like about it at all.

Like breakfast. To get reimbursement, you have to serve a whole grain alongside a fruit or a vegetable. You can't get reimubursed for any protein at breakfast--no eggs, no yogurt, no sausage, nada. I would much rather serve filling and long-lasting protein based breakfasts than carbs that don't stay with you long and lead to a snack attack later.

And then the rule about HAVING to serve iron-fortified rice cereal to babies who are between 6 months and 11 months at breakfast. Also the only snack you can be reimbursed for when you have a 6-11 month old is a cracker or whole grain type snack... really? Let's just fill those little guys up with carbs and not give anyone credit for introducing fruits and vegetables. My son never had rice cereal, and he was chowing down on sweet potatoes, peas, bananas, and so much more at 6-7 months old.

I may go off of it some day... right now, I'm making it work.

The milk thing is confusing, too. Yes, lots of kids are obese. But maybe it's because we have to feed them carbs and nutrient-poor meals and don't get credited for protein, veggies and fruits at snacks, or things like pomegranates (which my kids LOVE!!)
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Old 11-21-2013, 11:50 AM
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Originally Posted by preschoolteacher View Post
I'm on the food program too, and there are things I don't like about it at all.

Like breakfast. To get reimbursement, you have to serve a whole grain alongside a fruit or a vegetable. You can't get reimubursed for any protein at breakfast--no eggs, no yogurt, no sausage, nada. I would much rather serve filling and long-lasting protein based breakfasts than carbs that don't stay with you long and lead to a snack attack later.
I don't get the breakfast requirement either. I can see having to serve a grain on the side, but not to have some kind of protein? That's just odd.
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Old 11-21-2013, 11:52 AM
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Originally Posted by gracepatiencelove View Post
I just got on the food program and I'm just not liking it.

I've been reading a lot about milk and so have my DCP. We all agree on whole milk being the safest choice.... Food program lady calls and says no. Don't do that. I serve pomegranates and they're not on the claiming list... she says, don't serve.

I do not like being told to serve certain things. I'm not happy with this program. I am running a very small in home care program and I have been told/read in my handbook for food program... no wild caught food.... no home grown food.... you must do this this this... etc.

Am I the only person who thinks it is not worth it? I'm about to quit and raise prices or ask for some things to be provided... idk.
I quit the food program for these exact type of reasons. Not worth it to me.
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Old 11-21-2013, 11:58 AM
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I quit the food program for these exact type of reasons. Not worth it to me.
I second the motion. For the record, you CAN take your food off of your taxes, so you do get reimbursed in a way. It just is not in the form of a monthly check.
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Old 11-21-2013, 12:37 PM
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You CAN serve a protein at breakfast you just do not have to. In fact they want you to 1x a week and in the future it may be a reg but not yet. BUT they do not want you serving bacon, sausage etc high fat high sodium meats.

The infant cereal thing is for the iron it does not need to be rice in fact many drs start with oats

pretty sure the grain is optional for snack for that age heck they do not have to have ANy thing but bottle or formula until 8 months.
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Old 11-21-2013, 01:03 PM
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These aren't the ONLY foods you can serve, just the only ones you can claim. My meals often have more than what I claim, but there's just no way to claim it. Do I count the sausage or cheese as protein for pizza? I don't know!? I claim cheese because sausage is HF but it has both plus more veggies than tomato sauce. I just play by their rules for claiming purposes but serve what I want in addition.
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Old 11-21-2013, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by preschoolteacher View Post
I'm on the food program too, and there are things I don't like about it at all.

Like breakfast. To get reimbursement, you have to serve a whole grain alongside a fruit or a vegetable. You can't get reimubursed for any protein at breakfast--no eggs, no yogurt, no sausage, nada. I would much rather serve filling and long-lasting protein based breakfasts than carbs that don't stay with you long and lead to a snack attack later.

And then the rule about HAVING to serve iron-fortified rice cereal to babies who are between 6 months and 11 months at breakfast. Also the only snack you can be reimbursed for when you have a 6-11 month old is a cracker or whole grain type snack... really? Let's just fill those little guys up with carbs and not give anyone credit for introducing fruits and vegetables. My son never had rice cereal, and he was chowing down on sweet potatoes, peas, bananas, and so much more at 6-7 months old.

I may go off of it some day... right now, I'm making it work.

The milk thing is confusing, too. Yes, lots of kids are obese. But maybe it's because we have to feed them carbs and nutrient-poor meals and don't get credited for protein, veggies and fruits at snacks, or things like pomegranates (which my kids LOVE!!)
You can serve what you want. You just cant claim it. I am loving my $1000 monthly checks! I'm smiling all the way to the bank....
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Old 11-21-2013, 07:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Leigh View Post
You can serve things not on the list, you just can't CLAIM them. If you choose to serve Pomegranates, just make sure that you serve something else on the approved list, as well (maybe fruit juice).

As far as whole milk goes, all recommendations I have heard from our nutritionist and doctor that 1% is what is now recommended.
I'm surprised at this. I thought they needed the fat for the fat-soluble vitamins?
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Old 11-21-2013, 07:52 PM
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Originally Posted by preschoolteacher View Post
I'm on the food program too, and there are things I don't like about it at all.

Like breakfast. To get reimbursement, you have to serve a whole grain alongside a fruit or a vegetable. You can't get reimubursed for any protein at breakfast--no eggs, no yogurt, no sausage, nada. I would much rather serve filling and long-lasting protein based breakfasts than carbs that don't stay with you long and lead to a snack attack later.

And then the rule about HAVING to serve iron-fortified rice cereal to babies who are between 6 months and 11 months at breakfast. Also the only snack you can be reimbursed for when you have a 6-11 month old is a cracker or whole grain type snack... really? Let's just fill those little guys up with carbs and not give anyone credit for introducing fruits and vegetables. My son never had rice cereal, and he was chowing down on sweet potatoes, peas, bananas, and so much more at 6-7 months old.

I may go off of it some day... right now, I'm making it work.

The milk thing is confusing, too. Yes, lots of kids are obese. But maybe it's because we have to feed them carbs and nutrient-poor meals and don't get credited for protein, veggies and fruits at snacks, or things like pomegranates (which my kids LOVE!!)
Those are some of the higher carb fruit/veg
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Old 11-21-2013, 07:55 PM
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I'm surprised at this. I thought they needed the fat for the fat-soluble vitamins?
1% still has fat, as do other foods they eat. I am no expert on this, but the nutritionist that I work with, the county health nurse, and my pediatrician (as well as my state's food program and WIC programs) recommend 1% for kids over 12 months. My own drinks soy milk, so it doesn't affect me personally, but this is what I am required to serve to daycare kids over 12 months. Our state's WIC program recommends 1%, but allows skim, 1%, 2%, or whole.
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Old 11-22-2013, 05:38 AM
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You can serve what you want. You just cant claim it. I am loving my $1000 monthly checks! I'm smiling all the way to the bank....
The cost of food must be higher in your area, when I was full with 6 full time dcks, I never got close to $1000 reimbursement!
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Old 11-22-2013, 05:40 AM
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The cost of food must be higher in your area, when I was full with 6 full time dcks, I never got close to $1000 reimbursement!
Yeah, the ONLY way I see anything close to that is if ALL my 10-12 kids are present for all 3 meals/snacks and not absent at all during the month.
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Old 11-22-2013, 06:50 AM
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The cost of food must be higher in your area, when I was full with 6 full time dcks, I never got close to $1000 reimbursement!
Me either...and I am in an area that is Tier 2 anyway, so I was getting maybe 300 a month. Not worth the paperwork in my case, and too many odd rules, including that grain rule. Personally, I think the diet suggested by the food program is too high in carbs and not high enough in protein. I also serve whole milk to all the children regardless of age, but I do not feel the need to serve liquid milk at every meal.
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Old 11-22-2013, 07:39 AM
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I'm surprised at this. I thought they needed the fat for the fat-soluble vitamins?
They do! I am still serving whole milk. The FP rep has never said anything.

I find some of the rules ridiculous also - like the kids could not eat the freezer jam that they made here. Whatever! I do like TwinKristi- I mark down the closest thing on the list to what I am serving.

Quote:
Yeah, the ONLY way I see anything close to that is if ALL my 10-12 kids are present for all 3 meals/snacks and not absent at all during the month.
I am on Tier 2 so I rarely even get half that and that is if I have 12 kids here all day every day.
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Old 11-22-2013, 07:40 AM
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Me either...and I am in an area that is Tier 2 anyway, so I was getting maybe 300 a month. Not worth the paperwork in my case, and too many odd rules, including that grain rule. Personally, I think the diet suggested by the food program is too high in carbs and not high enough in protein. I also serve whole milk to all the children regardless of age, but I do not feel the need to serve liquid milk at every meal.
I agree that it's too carby! I want to be able to claim an egg at breakfast!

I am in an area that is tier 1 so I get higher reimbursement but still, some days I don't feel like it's worth it.
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Old 11-22-2013, 07:50 AM
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Carbohydrates are an important part of a child's diet (50%-60% of a child's diet who is 2 or older should be healthy carbs).

These carbs are a major source of energy for the body. Good carb choices are important (whole grains), which is why the food program demands them.

Last edited by Leigh; 11-22-2013 at 08:12 AM. Reason: Fixed part of a sentence that I accidentally deleted!
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Old 11-22-2013, 08:02 AM
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Protein is an important part too. I'm not saying do away with the carbs, I'm saying add more protein
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Old 11-22-2013, 08:07 AM
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Carbohydrates are an important part of a child's diet (50%-60% of a child 2 or older should be healthy carbs).

These carbs are a major source of energy for the body. Good carb choices are important (whole grains), which is why the food program demands them.
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Protein is an important part too. I'm not saying do away with the carbs, I'm saying add more protein


Healthy carbs are absolutely necessary for your body to process the protein.

If you eat a high protein diet with little or no carbs you will have just as many health issues as someone who eats a high carb/low protein diet.

Foods are definitely designed to work together.

My mom used to be a big time carb counter...then my DH got Type 1 diabetes and we learned about the necessity and importance of carbs (GOOD carbs) and their tie to protein.
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Old 11-22-2013, 08:13 AM
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That's what I'm trying to get at BC, thanks!

What I don't like about the food program is this: there is an option for cinnamon rolls but not for an egg for breakfast. There should be an option for a protein and a grain. An egg and a piece of whole grain toast is better than a cinnamon roll IMO.

But like someone else said, we can serve it, we just won't get reimbursed for it! And that's sucky.

This reminds me of the ritz cracker supplemented lunch.
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Old 11-22-2013, 08:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Leigh View Post
Carbohydrates are an important part of a child's diet (50%-60% of a child's diet who is 2 or older should be healthy carbs).

These carbs are a major source of energy for the body. Good carb choices are important (whole grains), which is why the food program demands them.
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Old 11-22-2013, 08:18 AM
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Yeah, the ONLY way I see anything close to that is if ALL my 10-12 kids are present for all 3 meals/snacks and not absent at all during the month.
I am open Monday-Saturday from 7am-9pm (used to be 6am). I have 7 DCKs and 5 kids of my own. If school is in session I may make a little less.
I also serve all meals and snack and I claim 3 for each child. It is a little more work but I have a system down now.
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Old 11-22-2013, 08:21 AM
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Oh, I see now! Wow, 6 days a week? I'd be so worn out.
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Old 11-22-2013, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by gracepatiencelove View Post
I just got on the food program and I'm just not liking it.

I've been reading a lot about milk and so have my DCP. We all agree on whole milk being the safest choice.... Food program lady calls and says no. Don't do that. I serve pomegranates and they're not on the claiming list... she says, don't serve.

I do not like being told to serve certain things. I'm not happy with this program. I am running a very small in home care program and I have been told/read in my handbook for food program... no wild caught food.... no home grown food.... you must do this this this... etc.

Am I the only person who thinks it is not worth it? I'm about to quit and raise prices or ask for some things to be provided... idk.
I checked on my food program and we are allowed to serve pomegranates. I thought that the food program was federally funded and the requirements are the same everywhere. The milk requirement is the same as yours, I think they are nuts if they think that changing milk requirements to skim, 1/2 or 1% is going to help combat childhood obesity. We are allowed wild game as long as it's usda certified. I question staying on the food program because of some of the rule changes.
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Old 11-22-2013, 08:35 AM
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Healthy carbs are absolutely necessary for your body to process the protein.

If you eat a high protein diet with little or no carbs you will have just as many health issues as someone who eats a high carb/low protein diet.

Foods are definitely designed to work together.


My mom used to be a big time carb counter...then my DH got Type 1 diabetes and we learned about the necessity and importance of carbs (GOOD carbs) and their tie to protein.
I don't disagree, but the food program demands too much. Well, ok they don't DEMAND it, but the suggestion is there. Also, I can't help but wonder why it is ok to serve an orange and liquid milk, but NOT ok to serve orange juice and yogurt with lunch?
Not necessarily every lunch, but why can't I switch it up. Same basic nutrients there..serve carrots too, and you have fiber. I just don't get it.
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Old 11-22-2013, 08:50 AM
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I don't disagree, but the food program demands too much. Well, ok they don't DEMAND it, but the suggestion is there. Also, I can't help but wonder why it is ok to serve an orange and liquid milk, but NOT ok to serve orange juice and yogurt with lunch?
Not necessarily every lunch, but why can't I switch it up. Same basic nutrients there..serve carrots too, and you have fiber. I just don't get it.
Because the orange juice companies don't have as big of a pull in government as the corn and dairy industries do...

Just be grateful that McDonald's doesn't get any input.


I agree about the weird guidelines the food program has but I just make do the best I can.

I don't feel that the majority of a child's nutritious eating/meals should come from me anyways.

I never expected the schools or my child's daycare to make sure my kids ate healthy. That was MY job as a parent.
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Old 11-22-2013, 08:54 AM
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I don't disagree, but the food program demands too much. Well, ok they don't DEMAND it, but the suggestion is there. Also, I can't help but wonder why it is ok to serve an orange and liquid milk, but NOT ok to serve orange juice and yogurt with lunch?
Not necessarily every lunch, but why can't I switch it up. Same basic nutrients there..serve carrots too, and you have fiber. I just don't get it.
My sponsor told me that the list isn't necessarily the law. She asked if there were something that I would like to claim that isn't on the list to contact her and she will investigate whether it meets criteria. There are plenty of things not on the list that could qualify to be claimed, and to send a label from a product or ask about another food and she will personally do the math for me to figure out if it is something claimable.
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Old 11-22-2013, 09:13 AM
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My sponsor told me that the list isn't necessarily the law. She asked if there were something that I would like to claim that isn't on the list to contact her and she will investigate whether it meets criteria. There are plenty of things not on the list that could qualify to be claimed, and to send a label from a product or ask about another food and she will personally do the math for me to figure out if it is something claimable.
That's awesome!
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Old 11-22-2013, 09:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
Because the orange juice companies don't have as big of a pull in government as the corn and dairy industries do...

Just be grateful that McDonald's doesn't get any input.


I agree about the weird guidelines the food program has but I just make do the best I can.

I don't feel that the majority of a child's nutritious eating/meals should come from me anyways.

I never expected the schools or my child's daycare to make sure my kids ate healthy. That was MY job as a parent.
Right?! sigh...
However, most of their nutrition DOES come from me. They want to walk in my door with chocolate cereal with marshmallows, and on the way out, mom is talking McDonalds...ugh!
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Old 11-22-2013, 09:24 AM
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I, too, had always heard that whole milk was best for kids. AAP recommendations are 1% for kids over 2, but whole up until 2 UNLESS the child is at risk of obesity or have a family history of heart disease, high cholesterol, or obesity, then they recommend 2% from 12-24 months, and 1% after.

Fat is important to the kids for brain development and vitamin absorption, but most kids are already getting too much fat from other sources, which is apparently the reason that recommendations have changed.

As far as protein, I think that the media and fad diets have made us all (including me) think that protein is the answer and carbs are the devil. A 29-pound toddler needs 16 grams of protein per day (only 2 cups of 1% milk provides this). Around only 20% of a toddler's caloric intake should be protein. Most kids get enough protein from dairy alone.

I just have to push my own preconceptions (based not on science, but what **I think**, based on media exposure, I suppose), and do the research on healthy eating for toddlers to make decision on what I feed them.
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Old 11-22-2013, 06:04 PM
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My rep said only 1% or skim to kids over 2. For the kids that don't like the taste you can add chocolate or strawberry syrup! So trade out the good fats and add strait syrup. It is horrible.
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Old 11-23-2013, 11:25 AM
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My sponsor told me that the list isn't necessarily the law. She asked if there were something that I would like to claim that isn't on the list to contact her and she will investigate whether it meets criteria. There are plenty of things not on the list that could qualify to be claimed, and to send a label from a product or ask about another food and she will personally do the math for me to figure out if it is something claimable.
This is true. And if you use MMK, you can invent a new food and put it in and your sponsor will see it and can decide if it's credible or not. I have done it once in the past and after I entered the food, wahlah...it was on the main list.
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Old 03-11-2014, 02:51 PM
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So the cakes and other junk food won't make them fat but milk will.. Oh yeah sounds about right...
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Old 03-11-2014, 03:05 PM
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So the cakes and other junk food won't make them fat but milk will.. Oh yeah sounds about right...

LOL! Itís great to see a military provider.
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Old 03-11-2014, 06:08 PM
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I don't take it that seriously. Pomegranate is on my list though so not sure why that would vary. I have an option for fruit salad it veggie plate or mixed veggies so if it's not on the list I do that option. We also serve only whole milk here and my FP rep has never asked. Plus, even if it's not on there, as long as it's not a day that your rep is there for an announced visit does it really matter it they have Pomegranate instead of pears?
I've got to say I feel the same way...
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Old 03-11-2014, 07:14 PM
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Here you can serve brownies, but not whole milk. How does that work? No meat that is not bought at a store. Once when I had a visit, the kids were picking strawberries, the monitor lady said, " Oh cool, that will count for part of their snack." Before that I was told that all food had to be store bought. I almost think it just depends on the person.
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Old 03-12-2014, 04:49 AM
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to count as a serving of fruit it has to be 1/4 cup and with the seed I would assume it would be 1/2 cup It is unlikely each child would eat or you would prepare a whole pomegranet per child. Yes serve them they are wonderful but as part of a fruit salad or and extra
this. But you can add them to pineapple (yum!) and count the pineapple.
Milk, yes whole is not recommended after 2. If you have a parent that wants it though, they can have their doctor write a note. Submit the note to the food program. For us, if they visit and I do not have 1% in my frig for those kids all claims back to the beginning of the month are denied. Now, think about it though- you serve 2 meals and a snack. If you don't claim milk on the snack that is only 2 glasses of milk a day that is the lower fat. Their parents can serve them whole, you can serve them whole after their glass and with snack if you still wish to. You will just not be reimbursed for the whole.
Is the food program worth it? For me it is. I am able to afford to provide formula,baby food and nutritious meals for my older ones.
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Old 03-12-2014, 04:55 AM
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Here you can serve brownies, but not whole milk. How does that work? No meat that is not bought at a store. Once when I had a visit, the kids were picking strawberries, the monitor lady said, " Oh cool, that will count for part of their snack." Before that I was told that all food had to be store bought. I almost think it just depends on the person.
We can have a garden here! We can not serve home canned items.
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Old 03-12-2014, 05:09 AM
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My doctor recommended I keep my kids on whole milk indefinitely. We eat a whole food diet and I have athletic, HUNGRY kids. My 15 year old was literally unable to eat enough calories last year to stay full and maintain her weight. I buy full fat unhomogenized pasteurized local milk. Good fats are not evil. We need them.

I know this is a little off topic but I am REALLY bothered by the reduction in milk fat that is now required as a result of childhood obesity. We are basically taking the only good fat many children receive away and replacing it with more empty carbs, bad fats and foods with little nutritional value. It's making the problem worse, not better.
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Old 03-12-2014, 05:34 AM
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My doctor recommended I keep my kids on whole milk indefinitely. We eat a whole food diet and I have athletic, HUNGRY kids. My 15 year old was literally unable to eat enough calories last year to stay full and maintain her weight. I buy full fat unhomogenized pasteurized local milk. Good fats are not evil. We need them.

I know this is a little off topic but I am REALLY bothered by the reduction in milk fat that is now required as a result of childhood obesity. We are basically taking the only good fat many children receive away and replacing it with more empty carbs, bad fats and foods with little nutritional value. It's making the problem worse, not better.
I agree. My doc says whole milk should be the priority fat.
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Old 03-12-2014, 10:03 AM
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I don't get the breakfast requirement either. I can see having to serve a grain on the side, but not to have some kind of protein? That's just odd.
That drives me nuts! There are only so many grains to serve. I wish it was grain OR protein so we could do eggs or sausage or bacon. It just doesn't seem like a meal without protein.
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Old 03-12-2014, 02:37 PM
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The milk thing isn't new. When I had my first baby over 20 years ago they told me when he turned 2 to change his milk to 1%. I did. He ate healthy and was active. The only treat he had was one donut hole per week when he and hubby went to the coffee shop on Sunday mornings. My daughter drank whole milk until she was 4 then refused any milk at all. She snacked, refused fruits and veggies and her diet consisted of grilled cheese, peanutbutter, bagels and hotdogs. We labelled her the carb moster. My son, who's 22 is now about 290 pounds. My daughter, who's 18 is very slim. My point is, a healthy, active childhood doesn't necessarily determine what you will turn out to be as an adult. My son went hog wild when he was old enough to drive and have a job. He bought sodas and snacks and unhealthy things because he was always denied them. My daughter still eats horribly but she takes suppliments and doesn't overindulge.

If you look at the elementary school lunch menu's you'll notice they are carb heavy as well.

My pediatricians always said when you give a carb, give a protein. They like to work together.

Just a friendly aside ... I know many of you are stating you're feeding the kids Pomegranate seeds but please be careful. I know of a child who inhaled one and ended up with a severe lung infection. He eventually needed surgery.
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Old 03-12-2014, 02:51 PM
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I second the motion. For the record, you CAN take your food off of your taxes, so you do get reimbursed in a way. It just is not in the form of a monthly check.
Yes, but on the food program, you still can take it off, AND you get a monthly check (which counts as income).
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Old 03-12-2014, 02:53 PM
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Just a friendly aside ... I know many of you are stating you're feeding the kids Pomegranate seeds but please be careful. I know of a child who inhaled one and ended up with a severe lung infection. He eventually needed surgery.
That is so scary. I've taken them off the menu since I posted this originally and just don't serve them to DCK anymore.
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Old 03-12-2014, 02:54 PM
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Yes, but on the food program, you still can take it off, AND you get a monthly check (which counts as income).
Wait, my tax person said I couldn't deduct food as an expense if I was on the food program.
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Old 03-12-2014, 02:57 PM
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Wait, my tax person said I couldn't deduct food as an expense if I was on the food program.
Well, you count the checks you get from the food program as income.

Then you automatically deduct that amount as food costs. Even Steven.

Then, you can ALSO deduct additional foods that you served as well as meals/snacks that are above and beyond the allotted 3 you can claim on the food program.

HTH
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Old 03-12-2014, 02:58 PM
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Well, you count the checks you get from the food program as income.

Then you automatically deduct that amount as food costs. Even Steven.

Then, you can ALSO deduct additional foods that you served as well as meals/snacks that are above and beyond the allotted 3 you can claim on the food program.

HTH
Okay, that makes sense

Thanks! It does. Filing away for future reference!
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Old 03-12-2014, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Meyou View Post
My doctor recommended I keep my kids on whole milk indefinitely. We eat a whole food diet and I have athletic, HUNGRY kids. My 15 year old was literally unable to eat enough calories last year to stay full and maintain her weight. I buy full fat unhomogenized pasteurized local milk. Good fats are not evil. We need them.

I know this is a little off topic but I am REALLY bothered by the reduction in milk fat that is now required as a result of childhood obesity. We are basically taking the only good fat many children receive away and replacing it with more empty carbs, bad fats and foods with little nutritional value. It's making the problem worse, not better.
Completely agree!
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Old 03-12-2014, 04:55 PM
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Completely agree!
I agree! I'm not ******** about milk myself (I like it but don't drink it often), but to say our obesity problem has ANYTHING to do with high-fat milk is just plain ridiculous.
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Old 03-23-2014, 09:23 PM
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I read some where that its not the whole milk that is making our kids fat, its all the fast food and junk food. You can always withdraw from the food program. Why cant you serve home grown veges?
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Old 03-24-2014, 06:18 AM
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I agree! I'm not ******** about milk myself (I like it but don't drink it often), but to say our obesity problem has ANYTHING to do with high-fat milk is just plain ridiculous.
The whole milk thing doesn't have anything to do with nutrition. It's all about money. The only cut to the food program that wouldn't be fought with millions of dollars of lobby money. Milk manufacturers WANT their fat back. They make money off of the fat products. As long as they can add HFCS to the milk they would rather do that then keep the fat in. Corn sugar is WAY cheaper to add than the loss of the fat.
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Old 03-24-2014, 06:24 AM
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That drives me nuts! There are only so many grains to serve. I wish it was grain OR protein so we could do eggs or sausage or bacon. It just doesn't seem like a meal without protein.
You CAN serve protein. You just don't HAVE to.

Remember that dairy products are proteiny too.
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Old 03-24-2014, 09:02 PM
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That is so scary. I've taken them off the menu since I posted this originally and just don't serve them to DCK anymore.
I've seen the same thing happen with a corn kernel. It can happen with any small food. Don't stop serving healthy foods because something might happen some day some where.
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Old 03-24-2014, 09:17 PM
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I quit the food program because I was spending way too much time on paperwork for too little return, especially since I essentially had to keep two menus, the real one, and then the FP one. Here, our program is all handwritten still. The upside is that you don't have a "food list" to worry about, but the down side, is hand writing EVERYTHING.


My real menu breakfast will say something like :

Milk
scrambled egg
strawberries
WW Toast

But then my FP Menu would say:

Milk
Strawberries
WW Toast

It was a huge pain. The milk thing was never a problem, because I always seem to have at least one doctor or NP in my daycare, and they'd write a note for anyone that wanted it.

BUT, I have parents that don't want their kids to have cow's milk for religious reasons etc.

Also, I should be able to serve yogurt instead of milk darn it. Grrrrr.

So, I just gave it up.
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Old 03-25-2014, 03:01 AM
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I read some where that its not the whole milk that is making our kids fat, its all the fast food and junk food. You can always withdraw from the food program. Why cant you serve home grown veges?
We CAN serve home grown veggies but we can't serve food that we've canned, I believe due to botulism risk.
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