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  #1  
Old 02-22-2011, 12:39 PM
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Default Reggio Emilia

My favorite apporach to "teaching" young children:


http://zerosei.comune.re.it/inter/reggiochildren.htm



http://www.brainy-child.com/article/reggioemilia.shtml
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Old 02-22-2011, 02:44 PM
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i am loving it too!!!

so are all of my parents!! i am so glad they are all on board with the changes i've made.
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Old 02-24-2011, 05:52 AM
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Crystal and Melskids -
I really like this approach and would love to make a move to this approach by the Fall.

Have either of you ever attended a conference or seminar to help with setting up your area and to gain ideas? I'd love to find a conference this summer to attend.

I found this site with a few conferences but didn't know if you guys had any other info. http://www.reggioalliance.org/
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Old 02-24-2011, 10:55 AM
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When I was a director of a preschool, we used some elements of this approach and were really trying to move toward this approach (while still following the basics of high scope). I would really like to do more with this in my current preschool...thanks for the links Crystal!

I have discovered so many awesome websites in the last couple of weeks since more people have been posting, it's awesome! I've really been spending too much time just reading through everything, it's been great.

Crystal and anyone else that currently does the project approach, I would love to hear an example of one of the studies that you've done from start to finish. How did it start? What kinds of things did you do to learn about it? How long was the process? How did you document it? Thanks!!
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Old 02-24-2011, 11:35 AM
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I too have been reading up on this approach and the montessori approach. They are almost similar in approaches. Both focus on children learning from experience and learning basic needs in daily life. I like that (esp learning by experience because thats what I teach my own children) I too have been slowly switching over. But what kind of stuff are you ladies doing.

I need to buy some plants, but what kind (the re method suggests plants)
also hanging childrens art work up (I love this)
small areas
bright painted walls (I have that)
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Old 02-24-2011, 11:46 AM
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We actually had some landscapers come out this week and in the next few days they are going to give us a little flower bed along our house and some landscaping for our raised veggie garden. It'll really add to our backyard .

Once all that is in place I can't wait to take the kids out to start planting some flowers in our flower bed and veggies in the garden.

I think as all those things start to grow it'll be great for the kids to feel like they are helping to take care of them and can really start to learn where their food comes from and what makes things grow, etc.

I'm also heading out this evening to get some plants for around the house to really add to the inside and I'm going to be adding some fish friends over the weekend.

I also need to start hanging the kids' artwork. What creative ways have you come up with the display their art? I'm thinking maybe clothes lines somehow but would love other ideas or pictures as well.

My goal is to be done with the packaged curriculum (currently MGT) in May and mostly nature-based, Reggio, etc. by the Fall.
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Old 02-24-2011, 12:09 PM
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I have the clothes line for their art projects, I bought it at the dollarstore and it came with clothes pins too. Mine hangs infront of the window. But I was thinking that if I bought some cheap frames I can hang them on my wall, but use the hooks that you can remove (I think its made by rubbermaid)
I see they use painting alot, I'm kinda wondering if it would work here. I have a small cart on wheels that is full of art stuff for the kids to use any time they want, and omgosh they love it, and they keep it clean.
I can't do anything outside right now because everything is burried under snow, but I think getting flowers in pots would be great.
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Old 02-24-2011, 12:20 PM
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I have the clothes line for their art projects, I bought it at the dollarstore and it came with clothes pins too. Mine hangs infront of the window. But I was thinking that if I bought some cheap frames I can hang them on my wall, but use the hooks that you can remove (I think its made by rubbermaid)
I see they use painting alot, I'm kinda wondering if it would work here. I have a small cart on wheels that is full of art stuff for the kids to use any time they want, and omgosh they love it, and they keep it clean.
I can't do anything outside right now because everything is burried under snow, but I think getting flowers in pots would be great.
I really like those rubbermaid hooks too and I think framing a few would look great! I just found this and it would be so easy! I have the ribbon and clothes pins already...just need to pick up some thumb tacks.

http://oliviarenn.blogspot.com/2010/...-kids-art.html
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Old 02-24-2011, 02:39 PM
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someone posted once a site about having a natural backyard. Well what she did was buy those flower planters, you know the brown ones you use for flowers. And she planted tomatoes in them, so the kids were all responsible for their own planter. I'm thinking of doing this too. Not only would it be easy but you can put them anywhere.
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Old 02-24-2011, 03:40 PM
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Originally Posted by SunflowerMama View Post
Crystal and Melskids -
I really like this approach and would love to make a move to this approach by the Fall.

Have either of you ever attended a conference or seminar to help with setting up your area and to gain ideas? I'd love to find a conference this summer to attend.

I found this site with a few conferences but didn't know if you guys had any other info. http://www.reggioalliance.org/
i WISH i could find a conference, or a training, or anything in my area. so far, ive just read anythig i could get my hands on, and searches online.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kendallina View Post
When I was a director of a preschool, we used some elements of this approach and were really trying to move toward this approach (while still following the basics of high scope). I would really like to do more with this in my current preschool...thanks for the links Crystal!

I have discovered so many awesome websites in the last couple of weeks since more people have been posting, it's awesome! I've really been spending too much time just reading through everything, it's been great.

Crystal and anyone else that currently does the project approach, I would love to hear an example of one of the studies that you've done from start to finish. How did it start? What kinds of things did you do to learn about it? How long was the process? How did you document it? Thanks!!
right now, i just have young ones here during the day. they are all two and under. so we haven't had alot of long term, in depth studies yet. some are a week, some just a day, depending on their attention spans.

one day last week when we were outside playing in the snow, they were amazed by our icicles on the roof. (they were literally the whole height of the house, some touched the ground !!!) so we brought some inside and put them in the sensory table, and on a shower curtain on the floor ( you should have seen me struggle with an 8 foot icicle, trying to get it in the door) they touched and played with them for quite awhile. we poured hot water on them, painted with them, watched them melt, tasted them, hammered on them with chisels (the outside is kind of foggy, but the insides are clear like glass), measured them, pretty much anything you could think of to do with ice. (we put some in the freezer to pull out in the summer!!!!!) i took notes on what they were learning, and some of the things they said, and took lots of pictures. then i took a posterboard, and pretty much "scrapbooked" it. ( i typed the words so it looked neat and tidy) it hangs on the wall that faces the door, so the parents can see it as soon as they walk in. and its down a little low, so the kids can see it as well. (they really love to see themselves in pictures!!!)

now, during this time, they were, (and still are), hooked on trains. so we had two "studies" going on at once.
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Old 02-24-2011, 06:16 PM
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I have all boys and one girl that i watch, well lately they've been playing with the dolls, dressing them, changing them. Can you imagine taking pictures and hanging them up so their dads can see them playing with the dolls.
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  #12  
Old 02-25-2011, 03:30 AM
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I have all boys and one girl that i watch, well lately they've been playing with the dolls, dressing them, changing them. Can you imagine taking pictures and hanging them up so their dads can see them playing with the dolls.



But observe what they are doing with the dolls. taking them to the store? or the doctors? or on a train ride? is it the clothes they are interested in? a lesson in washing laundry may be in order whatever they are doing with them is what i would play off of.

of course, if they're anything like my boys, they're swinging them around like light sabers, or hanging them off the chair by their ankles, pretending they are shark bait
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Old 02-25-2011, 05:12 AM
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I have all boys and one girl that i watch, well lately they've been playing with the dolls, dressing them, changing them. Can you imagine taking pictures and hanging them up so their dads can see them playing with the dolls.
I agree with MelsKids. There are a lot of lessons that can go with playing with dolls. Are they dressing the dolls and improving their fine motor coordination? Are they pretending to be their mommies and answering their cries, feeding them and taking care of them? You could write down what they're talking about with their babies and hang it up next to the pictures. Or could could make a chart about what babies need. You could even invite in a parent who has a little baby (if you don't have any in childcare) and have them be a special guest, talking about how they take care of their baby.
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Old 02-25-2011, 01:28 PM
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Originally Posted by kendallina View Post
When I was a director of a preschool, we used some elements of this approach and were really trying to move toward this approach (while still following the basics of high scope). I would really like to do more with this in my current preschool...thanks for the links Crystal!

I have discovered so many awesome websites in the last couple of weeks since more people have been posting, it's awesome! I've really been spending too much time just reading through everything, it's been great.

Crystal and anyone else that currently does the project approach, I would love to hear an example of one of the studies that you've done from start to finish. How did it start? What kinds of things did you do to learn about it? How long was the process? How did you document it? Thanks!!
Last fall one of the children said " I wish I could go inside of my body so I can see what it looks like"

We ran with it. By the time we completed this (over three months) the children could tell you about their heart, how it works and what it does. They learned about bones, including what happens when one gets broken and they were provided REAL cast materials and casted each other as well as dolls and broken sticks. They could tell you the function of the brain and what it looks like. Our environment became a docotrs office, an xray techs room, etc. We provided them with REAL medical tools and they also learned about the importance of proper nutrition, exercise, etc. There is so much detail I don't have time to share it all, but by the time we ended the study (over 3 months after we started) these children were like little med experts!

We ALWAYS start with a comment or question from a child or group of children. Then we use a web to plan ideas for each area of the program. Then we decide what we need to accomplish our goals. Then we enlist parents to bring in materials - for instance with this particular project our EMT parent brought in xrays and cast materials, a DR. parent brought in tools and skeletons, etc. and was a guest visitor for the children to ask questions and discuss things with.. We continue the project for as long as the children are interested and usually end up branching off into other projects along the way.

I document with LOTS of pictures. And, artwork - lots of writing and artwork. The children will then dictate theirt stories to me and I'll write it on a separate paper, make a frame and hang it up.

We are currently learning about artic animals and global warming. A child saw on television that the polar ice is melting and asked me "what happens to the polar bears when all the ice melts?"

Often times we have more than one study happening, as different groups of children have differing interests.

Use your imagination when planning and preparing.....children are capable of learning far more than we give thme credit for, as long as we provide them the resources!
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Old 02-25-2011, 01:40 PM
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BTW, photo documentation does not need to take up lots of space.

Photo albums are great for telling the story.

buy old small standing desktop calendars when they are like 10 cents and make litlle scrapbooks out of them - just cover each page, front and back with cutouts and then add the picture and a little note about what is happening. Then they are a standing flipbook of phots.

Make accordion style stand up frames out of posterboard and add photos.

websites are great resources for this....I really need to get mine back up.
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Old 02-25-2011, 01:45 PM
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Last fall one of the children said " I wish I could go inside of my body so I can see what it looks like"

We ran with it. By the time we completed this (over three months) the children could tell you about their heart, how it works and what it does. They learned about bones, including what happens when one gets broken and they were provided REAL cast materials and casted each other as well as dolls and broken sticks. They could tell you the function of the brain and what it looks like. Our environment became a docotrs office, an xray techs room, etc. We provided them with REAL medical tools and they also learned about the importance of proper nutrition, exercise, etc. There is so much detail I don't have time to share it all, but by the time we ended the study (over 3 months after we started) these children were like little med experts!

We ALWAYS start with a comment or question from a child or group of children. Then we use a web to plan ideas for each area of the program. Then we decide what we need to accomplish our goals. Then we enlist parents to bring in materials - for instance with this particular project our EMT parent brought in xrays and cast materials, a DR. parent brought in tools and skeletons, etc. and was a guest visitor for the children to ask questions and discuss things with.. We continue the project for as long as the children are interested and usually end up branching off into other projects along the way.

I document with LOTS of pictures. And, artwork - lots of writing and artwork. The children will then dictate theirt stories to me and I'll write it on a separate paper, make a frame and hang it up.

We are currently learning about artic animals and global warming. A child saw on television that the polar ice is melting and asked me "what happens to the polar bears when all the ice melts?"

Often times we have more than one study happening, as different groups of children have differing interests.

Use your imagination when planning and preparing.....children are capable of learning far more than we give thme credit for, as long as we provide them the resources!
Thanks Crystal, that's a great example! Do you web with the children?
I used to when I had a larger group at a center, but I only have 4-5 now and 2 aren't very verbal (still young) and the oldest is only 3.5. So, I'm having a hard time getting much out of them (*crickets...*), even when it's topics they're interested in.

As I write this, I think part of my problem is that I don't web right away when they're talking about it, I usually wait until the following week when we can more easily start a new 'theme'. I know, not very reggio, but I'd hate to plan for a week, then scrap it automatically when they start going in a new direction.

Also, my kiddos are only here 2 mornings/week, so it seems like they don't necessarily stay with an interest for very long, which I think is partly (mostly?) my fault.

I love that you talk about "studying" a topic. You used those words in another post and that's how I need to think about it. Right now I'm mostly just doing activities about a topic, but I don't feel like we're really 'studying' it. Thanks so much!

This post is mostly just me thinking aloud but I would love to hear what anyone's thoughts/suggestions are for me...this is what I really miss about having real life coworkers!
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Old 02-25-2011, 01:55 PM
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For those who asked about conferences, I don't know of any right now, but I am currently designing seminars for our mentoring program and will begin presenting them sometime around summer. When I do, I'll let you know about it, and I'll gladly send you my powerpoints and handouts.

Another thing I recommend is checking around for any programs that practice Reggio and visiting their program. Most are more than happy to allow you to visit and observe, if they are truly Reggio
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Old 02-25-2011, 01:59 PM
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Originally Posted by kendallina View Post
Thanks Crystal, that's a great example! Do you web with the children?
I used to when I had a larger group at a center, but I only have 4-5 now and 2 aren't very verbal (still young) and the oldest is only 3.5. So, I'm having a hard time getting much out of them (*crickets...*), even when it's topics they're interested in.

As I write this, I think part of my problem is that I don't web right away when they're talking about it, I usually wait until the following week when we can more easily start a new 'theme'. I know, not very reggio, but I'd hate to plan for a week, then scrap it automatically when they start going in a new direction.

Also, my kiddos are only here 2 mornings/week, so it seems like they don't necessarily stay with an interest for very long, which I think is partly (mostly?) my fault.

I love that you talk about "studying" a topic. You used those words in another post and that's how I need to think about it. Right now I'm mostly just doing activities about a topic, but I don't feel like we're really 'studying' it. Thanks so much!

This post is mostly just me thinking aloud but I would love to hear what anyone's thoughts/suggestions are for me...this is what I really miss about having real life coworkers!
Some times I web with the children, but not always. We do make lists together about EXACTLY what they want to know.....it's a chart with header:

Know Want To Know

Then we list what they already know and what they want to explore and web from there.

Yes, study. They are called "small group studies" small group because usually only part of the whole group has a REAL interest in the topic. So the interested group studies the topic, then they go back to the whole group during group gathering (what we call circle time) and at random times and share what they have learned and what they are currently working on.
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Old 02-26-2011, 12:58 PM
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For those who asked about conferences, I don't know of any right now, but I am currently designing seminars for our mentoring program and will begin presenting them sometime around summer. When I do, I'll let you know about it, and I'll gladly send you my powerpoints and handouts.

Another thing I recommend is checking around for any programs that practice Reggio and visiting their program. Most are more than happy to allow you to visit and observe, if they are truly Reggio
i would LOVE that!!!

we don't have ANY reggio programs locally, at all. (just a few montessori, that's all)
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Old 02-28-2011, 02:35 PM
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i would LOVE that!!!

we don't have ANY reggio programs locally, at all. (just a few montessori, that's all)
You got it. As soon as I am done I'll send it to you. I'd love some feedback before I actually present it!!!
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Old 10-31-2011, 09:36 PM
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Default reggio emilia

I have studied in an ECE graduate program the Reggio approach.
"We envision a world where all children are honored and respected for their potential, their capabilities, and their humanity." This comes from the NAREA website. The focus is on the child. The environment is considered the "3rd teacher. This means that it has an enormous impact on the learning that takes place. Walls should be pale, soft pastels, plain, no commercially purchased charts, things are handmade by children, teachers and parents. The community and the parents are involved in the education of the children. Children do not come to school as empty vessels for teachers to fill with facts, but are viewed as capable, able to build theories and competent learners. Teachers work alongside the children. Interest areas are intended to address the various intelligences of the childen.

Representational Development is used to integrate the graphic arts to measure linguistic, cognitive and social develpment. Photos are displayed, with documentation of the conversations that take place as the children explore. Reggio uses an Emergent Curriculum, which is based on the interests of the childen. Project work is part of the emergent curriculum and teachers research the topics that interest the children, meet to discuss materials needed for the project, what direction the project may take, decide to include parents or members of the community, and the project may last a week or an entire year.

Collaboration is an important concept as children work in groups to promote group membership. Teachers also show that each child is unique and respected.

Materials are not plastic, wood and natural materials are used in the clasroom. Aesthetics are stressed and recycled materials are plentiful. There is an assortmet of high quality paintbruses, markers, and.colored pencils. Art is open ended, easels are always available, and children are encouraged to use their creativity rather than create art that is directed by the teacher.

The child is seen as a miracle, unlike any other, and the classroom is a beautiful learning space, furniture is arranged systematically, plants, (check for non-toxic) and the beauty of nature exists inside the class and appreciated outdoors. Children climb trees, smell flowers, study leaves, collect rocks, and learn to love nature. Reggio inspired classrooms, inspired is used for schools outside of Italy, listen to each child's melody.

Trainings are avaiable, and certainly, visiting Reggio Emilia is a true way to see the program. There are centers throughout the world. I beleve it is a program worth exploring.
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Old 11-01-2011, 02:10 PM
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What do you do if your kids never show interest in anything? We do MGT and they love it but we are learning about one whole thing for a month but its not like someone says I just love trains. I have 2 and 3 year olds and they really don't show much interest in much besides playing and what we are learning through MGT.
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Old 11-01-2011, 05:53 PM
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The Reggio approach is completely irrelevant in this culture...at least in mine.

It is beautiful inspiration, to be sure.

Firstly, collaboration is not going to happen in my context because, for now, I work alone. You need a strong staff of passionate educators as well as a cook and preferably a resident artist.

Also, something I've considered is that early education is valued by the entire community there. Here it is barely noticed or valued at all. There it is built into the school system, here it is open market.

I have learned a ton and taken a ton of inspiration from many types of preschools. Montessori, Waldorf, Reggio inspired, traditional, progressive, play based, etc etc.
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Old 11-02-2011, 09:43 AM
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The Reggio approach is completely irrelevant in this culture...at least in mine.

It is beautiful inspiration, to be sure.

Firstly, collaboration is not going to happen in my context because, for now, I work alone. You need a strong staff of passionate educators as well as a cook and preferably a resident artist.

Also, something I've considered is that early education is valued by the entire community there. Here it is barely noticed or valued at all. There it is built into the school system, here it is open market.

I have learned a ton and taken a ton of inspiration from many types of preschools. Montessori, Waldorf, Reggio inspired, traditional, progressive, play based, etc etc.
Nice post!

I have also decided to implement a collaboration of many different approaches.

Each of them all seem to really require parents (and communtiy) to be really supportive of the work you and the children do and that does not seem to be a priority with today's parents.

I love little aspects of all the different approaches and right now am really stuck on Emergent Curriculum and Project Approach. But since the group of children I currently have will change in the coming year(s) as new ones enroll and older ones leave, I will probably switch it up again dependant on the group dynamics that currently exist.
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Old 11-02-2011, 10:50 AM
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Exactly.

Part of the Reggio system is being with the same group of children for a few years. Waldorf students stay with the same teacher through age 7, I think.

Part of the beauty, too is having a staff of teachers with the same group who can sit around (drink wine, lol) and discuss the children's work. Just having someone to speak with and springboard so often leads to really good ideas for me in furthering the kids' learning.

Maybe someday.
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Old 11-02-2011, 11:31 AM
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Of course there are wonderful aspects of Reggio that would not be possible in North America. No, this is not R.E. Italy, but we can certainly extract the concepts that we can do with the children. It's not all or nothing. It's also not easy to transform your style as a teacher to match the Reggio model. It takes time, some ingenuity and desire. Let's focus on what we CAN do, rather what we cannot do.
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Old 11-02-2011, 11:45 AM
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Of course there are wonderful aspects of Reggio that would not be possible in North America. No, this is not R.E. Italy, but we can certainly extract the concepts that we can do with the children. It's not all or nothing. It's also not easy to transform your style as a teacher to match the Reggio model. It takes time, some ingenuity and desire. Let's focus on what we CAN do, rather what we cannot do.
Sure, I hear you.

Still, it's a cohesive system that is built around the fact that the community embraces ECE. It is built on the fact that those teachers are respected and supported in their efforts to be professionals. Also, built on years of study and practice. Without the foundation, the other components often do not work properly.

RE has been always been an inspiration for me, as have many other styles.

I become irritated at the, not only romanticizing of this cultures way, but the elitism that often goes with any certain given method.

I see all these copycat classrooms and wonder who is really playing there? Who is it really for?

I do applaud anyone who takes a step toward values such as "respecting the child" "environment as the third teacher" and "100 languages". Those are good solid values in my opinion. Those are also values that are found in nearly every other methodology founded on research in ECE.
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Old 11-02-2011, 12:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Crystal View Post
For those who asked about conferences, I don't know of any right now, but I am currently designing seminars for our mentoring program and will begin presenting them sometime around summer. When I do, I'll let you know about it, and I'll gladly send you my powerpoints and handouts.

Another thing I recommend is checking around for any programs that practice Reggio and visiting their program. Most are more than happy to allow you to visit and observe, if they are truly Reggio
Sign me up please!!
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