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  #1  
Old 08-26-2016, 09:30 AM
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Default The Underestimation of America's Preschool Teachers

Copied and pasted from another forum:

"Brain science shows that this combination of caring and educating must go hand in hand for this age group. While a 14-year-old might manage to learn something about the Constitution from a social-studies teacher he doesnt like, a 4-year-old is incapable of learning much from an adult he does not trust.
That truth contradicts the idea that the care and education of children can ever be separated, Whitebook argues. A child doesnt think, Oh now Im in child care and Im being cared for. Oh, Im in preschool, now Im learning, Whitebook said. Theyre learning all the time and theres the potential to facilitate their learning all the time.

That is also an argument for paying everyone in charge of young children more than theyre paid now. While teachers like Kendall, who work in public-school districts, tend to be paid on par with their K-12 peers, other public-preschool teachers, private-center teachers, and home-based child care workers are paid far less. Three-quarters of the early educator workforce is paid less than $15 an hour...."



http://www.theatlantic.com/education...achers/495917/
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Old 08-26-2016, 09:36 AM
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I so agree with this.

we can have the best looking program, teach everything under the sun, but if we are not sensitive teachers when we teach, we might as well not even try. No child wants to learn, or should I say, no child can learn if a teacher is not encouraging, motivating and sensitive when they teach.

The 3 have to exist together.

I recall a saying someone said once.

you will catch more bees with honey than vinegar...
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Old 08-26-2016, 09:56 AM
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Classic intrinsic motivation argument. They learn because they like and trust you; they want to please you.

IDK.

I always learned best from teachers who loved the subject they taught. It showed, they had a joy about it and clearly wanted to share that.

The problem still comes down to who pays. Parents, employers or taxpayers? Raise rates across the boards and more parents will need public assistance or another "cost of living" minimum wage increase. There are no magic beans other than personal accountability, IMHO. Not being over regulated to financial crush-n-run would certainly help providers.
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Old 08-26-2016, 10:32 AM
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After re-reading it occurs to me I have heard a very similar story before about another industry.

Our county fire department was low performing and had serious morale and financial shortfalls. They needed a better source of revenue so they engulfed the local EMS companies, pushing them out of business and absorbed their profits to prop up their own sinking ship.

They sold the community on it by stating how their fire personnel would now be better trained and their homeowners insurance rates would drop due to their higher rating. They later hiked the millage rates instead.... quietly.

They never mentioned all the hardworking business owners who had served honorably for years losing their contracts. They kept stories out of the local paper about the real number of jobs actually lost. Nobody was informed of the minimum training fire personnel were actually given or the lowered standards of care they are actually getting for their effort.
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Old 09-12-2016, 07:42 AM
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Default Low Pay Undermines Quality

http://www2.ed.gov/about/inits/ed/ea...eport-2016.pdf
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Old 09-12-2016, 10:11 AM
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in my recent class I was taking I wrote a paper on high quality does not equate to the amount of money you paid on your environment or how highly educated your staff is. It is how they do it that matters.

you can have a million dollar set up, but if your teachers are not connected with the children, provide a sensitive and encouraging learning approach, you might as well flush everything down the drain.

I honestly don't think that paying a teacher more money is going to change a teachers approach on how they teach. I have met teachers that have degrees above an beyond, but no patience for the children. No patience or acceptance of the diverse parenting styles.

I don't think that the education we get in the classroom in regards to really understanding the science behind the "why" is enough. Im over 40 and have been in the classroom most of my life. I still feel that I need more training to be a better teacher. I know that there are few teachers that continue going to school over the years and I really think that is where the money needs to be spent.

As an in home daycare provider that does not participate in any government assistant programs, I am given zero support and are never included in any trainings, workshops or etc.

It's really asking how do we get everyone to drink the same water?
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Old 09-12-2016, 10:25 AM
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Originally Posted by daycare View Post
in my recent class I was taking I wrote a paper on high quality does not equate to the amount of money you paid on your environment or how highly educated your staff is. It is how they do it that matters.

you can have a million dollar set up, but if your teachers are not connected with the children, provide a sensitive and encouraging learning approach, you might as well flush everything down the drain.

I honestly don't think that paying a teacher more money is going to change a teachers approach on how they teach. I have met teachers that have degrees above an beyond, but no patience for the children. No patience or acceptance of the diverse parenting styles.

I don't think that the education we get in the classroom in regards to really understanding the science behind the "why" is enough. Im over 40 and have been in the classroom most of my life. I still feel that I need more training to be a better teacher. I know that there are few teachers that continue going to school over the years and I really think that is where the money needs to be spent.

As an in home daycare provider that does not participate in any government assistant programs, I am given zero support and are never included in any trainings, workshops or etc.

It's really asking how do we get everyone to drink the same water?
I 100% disagree with that statement.

The #1 complaint/vent read on ANY caregiver board or heard from ANYONE who works in the field of caregiving is feeling under appreciated, taken advantage of and/or not being respected.....ALL of which directly related to how "valued" the person is.

The number one driving factor to providers putting up with stuff they shouldn't have to, dealing with tough kids and disrespectful clients is "needing the income" or "can't afford to term"

Vacations and time off (so you..general you...isn't always over worked and stressed to the max) is impacted GREATLY by whether or not the provider can afford to take the time off, whether or not the provider can afford to make a family upset etc.....

I 100% believe that if the pay scale even slightly matched the work load and responsibilities placed on not only in home family providers (but center workers and ECE teachers) the quality of care would improve.

Whether it is due to simply not having to stress in how to meet our own financial requirements or being paid more so that we can take/find the time to take time for ourselves and our families, the entire atmosphere of caregiving would change. Less stress = less burnt out.

I know money doesn't solve everything.... but it sure helps lessen the stress load an over worked, burnt out caregiver is trying to balance.

An underpaid caregiver in a million dollar set up is not going to make a huge impact in anything...including her self-worth.

A well paid caregiver with nothing but the bare minimum is going to have the mental capacity and the willingness to make something out of nothing. The capacity to do that I believe IS impacted by the caregiver not having to stress about where her next $1 is coming from.
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Old 09-12-2016, 10:40 AM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
I 100% disagree with that statement.

The #1 complaint/vent read on ANY caregiver board or heard from ANYONE who works in the field of caregiving is feeling under appreciated, taken advantage of and/or not being respected.....ALL of which directly related to how "valued" the person is.

The number one driving factor to providers putting up with stuff they shouldn't have to, dealing with tough kids and disrespectful clients is "needing the income" or "can't afford to term"

Vacations and time off (so you..general you...isn't always over worked and stressed to the max) is impacted GREATLY by whether or not the provider can afford to take the time off, whether or not the provider can afford to make a family upset etc.....

I 100% believe that if the pay scale even slightly matched the work load and responsibilities placed on not only in home family providers (but center workers and ECE teachers) the quality of care would improve.

Whether it is due to simply not having to stress in how to meet our own financial requirements or being paid more so that we can take/find the time to take time for ourselves and our families, the entire atmosphere of caregiving would change. Less stress = less burnt out.

I know money doesn't solve everything.... but it sure helps lessen the stress load an over worked, burnt out caregiver is trying to balance.

An underpaid caregiver in a million dollar set up is not going to make a huge impact in anything...including her self-worth.

A well paid caregiver with nothing but the bare minimum is going to have the mental capacity and the willingness to make something out of nothing. The capacity to do that I believe IS impacted by the caregiver not having to stress about where her next $1 is coming from.
I agree with this BC. I lived well below the poverty level, and in the back of my head, at all times was a running fear of what I would be paid, what I owed, if my car would start when I left, if I could afford to pay daycare from my tips this week or if I would have to dip into my crappy paycheck, etc. When I was a waitress, I was so absolutely miserable because I was paid so poorly (and I was treated wonderfully!) I had to fake a smile and get through my day. I worked through EVERYTHING because I could NOT afford to take time off. It was also a job I could 'disconnect' myself from, go through the motions. You cannot do that in child care.

I can afford to take days off if needed. I can afford to take a vacation. I can afford my medical bills and insurance. I can afford my mortgage. I have a safe, reliable vehicle. My stress level, although still working a very demanding job with long hours, is MUCH less.
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Old 09-12-2016, 11:08 AM
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There is no way I would do this job if my husband's job didn't pay all of our bills. I don't know how people worry about getting paid from parents and depend on them to pay in order to pay their own bills. This forum has shown time and time again that child care providers are generally really nice people and a lot of daycare parents will take advantage of that.

There is also no way I would work in a center for $9 an hour. Ugh. This is a tough business. I like kids, I always wanted my own business, I get to use marketing skills, which I like, I get to teach, which I like, and it's an enormous tax write off, which I love.

If I wasn't full or made less money, I'd quit in a heartbeat.

I'm also sick of studies. One study says preschool doesn't matter, keep your kids home. The next says, sends them it matters. This one focuses on the care givers. Eh. Bite me study takers.
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Old 09-12-2016, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by daycare View Post
in my recent class I was taking I wrote a paper on high quality does not equate to the amount of money you paid on your environment or how highly educated your staff is. It is how they do it that matters.

you can have a million dollar set up, but if your teachers are not connected with the children, provide a sensitive and encouraging learning approach, you might as well flush everything down the drain.

I honestly don't think that paying a teacher more money is going to change a teachers approach on how they teach.
I have met teachers that have degrees above an beyond, but no patience for the children. No patience or acceptance of the diverse parenting styles.

I don't think that the education we get in the classroom in regards to really understanding the science behind the "why" is enough. Im over 40 and have been in the classroom most of my life. I still feel that I need more training to be a better teacher. I know that there are few teachers that continue going to school over the years and I really think that is where the money needs to be spent.

As an in home daycare provider that does not participate in any government assistant programs, I am given zero support and are never included in any trainings, workshops or etc.

It's really asking how do we get everyone to drink the same water?
I think people are mostly motivated by money when it comes to the job they choose, so I do think that paying more can increase productivity. However, I also understand what you are saying. Some people are not meant to be teachers or to spend their living around children. Sometimes, they realize this too late (after a degree), but many people also figure this out really quickly. I know a few friends who are teachers and literally cannot stand kids, which I get, but it is an odd profession to choose, kwim? I think there are many of us who are invested in this career and deserve to make a good income off of it, but of course, there will always be those whose hearts are just not in it.
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Old 09-12-2016, 12:09 PM
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I think people are mostly motivated by money when it comes to the job they choose, so I do think that paying more can increase productivity. However, I also understand what you are saying. Some people are not meant to be teachers or to spend their living around children. Sometimes, they realize this too late (after a degree), but many people also figure this out really quickly. I know a few friends who are teachers and literally cannot stand kids, which I get, but it is an odd profession to choose, kwim? I think there are many of us who are invested in this career and deserve to make a good income off of it, but of course, there will always be those whose hearts are just not in it.
Education 101 at every college begins with:

"If you are looking to make a ton of money, this is NOT the right profession for you."

Repeated in classrooms every year.
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Old 09-12-2016, 12:19 PM
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Education 101 at every college begins with:

"If you are looking to make a ton of money, this is NOT the right profession for you."

Repeated in classrooms every year.
I don't think everyone's goal is to make a ton of money any more. I think most are trying to make enough to get by or to be comfortable at least. Teachers still have retirement benefits and health care that is desireable. Throw in the idea of summer's and holidays off and people think it is an "easy" job. I think many start and do not stay for the long haul...just like daycare providers. Stay home with my kid, work from the comfort of my home, ects? Sounds amazing until you figure out how much work is involved!
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Old 09-12-2016, 02:38 PM
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The number 1 reason for me contemplating leaving this field is the crappy pay. I am an ECE so an educated professional who will likely make $14 an hour if I go back to work at a daycare centre. The guy who picks up my garbage makes $22 an hour and needs a grade 10 education. Does that make any logical sense? The only reason that I can see as to why we get paid so little is because 99% of us are women.

Can you imagine if all of the DCP walked off the job for a day? The whole economy would grind to a halt. THAT is how important we are!
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Old 09-12-2016, 03:47 PM
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I don't think everyone's goal is to make a ton of money any more. I think most are trying to make enough to get by or to be comfortable at least. Teachers still have retirement benefits and health care that is desireable. Throw in the idea of summer's and holidays off and people think it is an "easy" job. I think many start and do not stay for the long haul...just like daycare providers. Stay home with my kid, work from the comfort of my home, ects? Sounds amazing until you figure out how much work is involved!
As the requirements increase the pay should as well.

Whether it's your goal to make a ton of money or just enough to survive, the pay does not even come close to matching the increase in requirements.

I also agree that everyone's goal isn't to make a ton of money... but everyone's goal IS to make enough to not be considered barely hanging on....
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Old 09-12-2016, 03:50 PM
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The number 1 reason for me contemplating leaving this field is the crappy pay. I am an ECE so an educated professional who will likely make $14 an hour if I go back to work at a daycare centre. The guy who picks up my garbage makes $22 an hour and needs a grade 10 education. Does that make any logical sense? The only reason that I can see as to why we get paid so little is because 99% of us are women.

Can you imagine if all of the DCP walked off the job for a day? The whole economy would grind to a halt. THAT is how important we are!
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Old 09-12-2016, 03:55 PM
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I 100% disagree with that statement.

The #1 complaint/vent read on ANY caregiver board or heard from ANYONE who works in the field of caregiving is feeling under appreciated, taken advantage of and/or not being respected.....ALL of which directly related to how "valued" the person is.

The number one driving factor to providers putting up with stuff they shouldn't have to, dealing with tough kids and disrespectful clients is "needing the income" or "can't afford to term"

Vacations and time off (so you..general you...isn't always over worked and stressed to the max) is impacted GREATLY by whether or not the provider can afford to take the time off, whether or not the provider can afford to make a family upset etc.....

I 100% believe that if the pay scale even slightly matched the work load and responsibilities placed on not only in home family providers (but center workers and ECE teachers) the quality of care would improve.

Whether it is due to simply not having to stress in how to meet our own financial requirements or being paid more so that we can take/find the time to take time for ourselves and our families, the entire atmosphere of caregiving would change. Less stress = less burnt out.

I know money doesn't solve everything.... but it sure helps lessen the stress load an over worked, burnt out caregiver is trying to balance.

An underpaid caregiver in a million dollar set up is not going to make a huge impact in anything...including her self-worth.

A well paid caregiver with nothing but the bare minimum is going to have the mental capacity and the willingness to make something out of nothing. The capacity to do that I believe IS impacted by the caregiver not having to stress about where her next $1 is coming from.
I can't say that I do agree. I don't think that more money is going to make me feel any less stress. Many times people get more money and get into more trouble with money, causing more stress. I also think that with more money, it can attract the wrong people into a field. I know of many of doctors who are very well off, but are HORRIBLE people.

I make good money at what I do, but I also know that with it comes a lot of sacrifice from not only me, but my family. I enjoy what I do, no, I love it. I can't say that more money would make me better at what I do. BUt I know that if my state spent more money on training me and other providers in our field, that we could be even better.

There is a right fit for this job, it comes with being a compassionate nurturer, which is why I believe that there are so many women that lead this field. I do believe that we are born to nurture. But we are not born with sensitivity and patience. I guess you could relate this to nurses vs. doctors. Then again, look at the pay difference. I actually do not think that those are things that most adults can learn.

in my home country, teachers are more respected than doctors, and they do not make much money at all. I think that a lot of it has to do with how society influences us about the attitude of them. In my eyes, many here do not see or understand the real importance of of good early or primary education.

I do think that early childcare providers have the strongest impact on the foundation of a childs life. I recall hating my primary teacher and I know now that this is why I hated school so much growing up.

I also think that WE as providers have a hand in those sasticts that dictate if a child will be a criminal or a well educated person. If everyone knew this, yes, I think that we would be more respected, and I would take that over the money.
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Old 09-12-2016, 04:09 PM
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There is a right fit for this job, it comes with being a compassionate nurturer, which is why I believe that there are so many women that lead this field. I do believe that we are born to nurture. But we are not born with sensitivity and patience. I guess you could relate this to nurses vs. doctors. Then again, look at the pay difference. I actually do not think that those are things that most adults can learn.
I am odd man out in this as I am one provider that did NOT go purposely into this field. I do not consider myself a natural born nurturer or overly compassionate person.

I don't know the right wording but the stereotypical "traits" most providers have that lead them to this profession are not traits I have/hold.

I've heard "I have known since the day I was born that I wanted to work with kids and make a difference in their lives" as a standard description or text book answer from most providers as to why they are in this field or what lead them here.....

That does not describe me at all. I do not believe I have to have any natural born traits (normally associated with this career choice) to know what I am doing and to do it well.

I am sure that isn't clear and probably sounds rambly but I'm on my way out the door... I'll elaborate more later.
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Old 09-12-2016, 04:11 PM
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I can't say that I do agree. I don't think that more money is going to make me feel any less stress. Many times people get more money and get into more trouble with money, causing more stress. I also think that with more money, it can attract the wrong people into a field. I know of many of doctors who are very well off, but are HORRIBLE people.

I make good money at what I do, but I also know that with it comes a lot of sacrifice from not only me, but my family. I enjoy what I do, no, I love it. I can't say that more money would make me better at what I do. BUt I know that if my state spent more money on training me and other providers in our field, that we could be even better.

There is a right fit for this job, it comes with being a compassionate nurturer, which is why I believe that there are so many women that lead this field. I do believe that we are born to nurture. But we are not born with sensitivity and patience. I guess you could relate this to nurses vs. doctors. Then again, look at the pay difference. I actually do not think that those are things that most adults can learn.

in my home country, teachers are more respected than doctors, and they do not make much money at all. I think that a lot of it has to do with how society influences us about the attitude of them. In my eyes, many here do not see or understand the real importance of of good early or primary education.

I do think that early childcare providers have the strongest impact on the foundation of a childs life. I recall hating my primary teacher and I know now that this is why I hated school so much growing up.

I also think that WE as providers have a hand in those sasticts that dictate if a child will be a criminal or a well educated person. If everyone knew this, yes, I think that we would be more respected, and I would take that over the money.
I can't speak for the U.S.A but in Canada anybody can open a home daycare and get kids. We get a LOT of people who have no other options with zero education running home daycares. My neighbourhood is saturated with people providing care for $30 a day and they don't follow regulations. For them it is about the $$ because they can't do anything else and most of them are new immigrants who can barely speak english. This is my competition and it is absolutely demoralizing for me as someone who chose this as my career. At least in the USA there is a much bigger incentive to be licensed and most people are so you can weed out the people who might get into it for the money but here there is no incentive to be licensed.

I was recently "chastized" on an FB group for adverising the fact that I am a registered ECE and what that means (most parents have no clue that we answer to a governing body and have to complete continuous learning modules to stay current). Seriously! I was told that I am no better than someone without an ECE and to get off my high horse. The admin refused to put up my ad unless I changed it. All I was doing was trying to sell myself and educate people on why I am of value. Even within my own field we get zero respect.

Can you tell I am feeling discouraged?!
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Old 09-12-2016, 06:00 PM
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I can't speak for the U.S.A but in Canada anybody can open a home daycare and get kids. We get a LOT of people who have no other options with zero education running home daycares. My neighbourhood is saturated with people providing care for $30 a day and they don't follow regulations. For them it is about the $$ because they can't do anything else and most of them are new immigrants who can barely speak english. This is my competition and it is absolutely demoralizing for me as someone who chose this as my career. At least in the USA there is a much bigger incentive to be licensed and most people are so you can weed out the people who might get into it for the money but here there is no incentive to be licensed.

I was recently "chastized" on an FB group for adverising the fact that I am a registered ECE and what that means (most parents have no clue that we answer to a governing body and have to complete continuous learning modules to stay current). Seriously! I was told that I am no better than someone without an ECE and to get off my high horse. The admin refused to put up my ad unless I changed it. All I was doing was trying to sell myself and educate people on why I am of value. Even within my own field we get zero respect.

Can you tell I am feeling discouraged?!
Yes! I agree!

I don't feel I was a bad provider at all before I went back to school and earned a degree. I was a good, quality provider.

But I am a better provider since I went back to school and earned a degree.

Before anyone gets offended, it does not mean I think I am better than anyone without a degree. What I am saying is I (personally and professionally) am a better provider than I was before I went back to school to earn a degree.

Should I be paid more because I have a degree verses someone who doesn't? QRIS thinks so because I am paid more by the state that licenses me than providers without a degree.
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Old 09-12-2016, 08:04 PM
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Can you imagine if all of the DCP walked off the job for a day? The whole economy would grind to a halt. THAT is how important we are!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
I've heard "I have known since the day I was born that I wanted to work with kids and make a difference in their lives" as a standard description or text book answer from most providers as to why they are in this field or what lead them here.....
That got me thinking again about something I'm curious about. I'm going to start a new thread.

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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
Before anyone gets offended, it does not mean I think I am better than anyone without a degree. What I am saying is I (personally and professionally) am a better provider than I was before I went back to school to earn a degree.
Doesn't offend me. I think most of the providers here are better than me because I haven't started yet and have no day care experience or training. I'm starting off with a love for children, years of babysitting experience, and the desire to go into a business doing something I know I will love to do.

hint hint, that's what I'm going to start a thread about
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Old 09-13-2016, 10:34 AM
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Yes! I agree!

I don't feel I was a bad provider at all before I went back to school and earned a degree. I was a good, quality provider.

But I am a better provider since I went back to school and earned a degree.

Before anyone gets offended, it does not mean I think I am better than anyone without a degree. What I am saying is I (personally and professionally) am a better provider than I was before I went back to school to earn a degree.

Should I be paid more because I have a degree verses someone who doesn't? QRIS thinks so because I am paid more by the state that licenses me than providers without a degree.
I personally think it does a disservice to our whole line of work if we say education simply doesn't matter In this field. A great provider with an education is going to be better than a great provider without hands down, it is just common sense.

The USA just seems so much more on the ball when it comes to this stuff. I get zero benefit from being educated home provider other than the yearly bill of calling myself an ECE and having to devote time to continuous learning. Get this, if I wanted to become licensed they would send an ECE to my home for an inspection. The irony is crazy
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Old 09-13-2016, 12:57 PM
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I personally think it does a disservice to our whole line of work if we say education simply doesn't matter In this field. A great provider with an education is going to be better than a great provider without hands down, it is just common sense.

The USA just seems so much more on the ball when it comes to this stuff. I get zero benefit from being educated home provider other than the yearly bill of calling myself an ECE and having to devote time to continuous learning. Get this, if I wanted to become licensed they would send an ECE to my home for an inspection. The irony is crazy
I definitely do not discount education as a positive thing, but I feel that a provider with experience is far more beneficial. I just look at education as a bonus, but as a parent, if it came down to a provider with years of actual hands on experience/confidence int heir ability, versus one with a degree who is new to the field, I would probably choose the veteran. There is so much they cannot teach you about many professions, but I think any education is great. It is just not something I look to when deciding on who to provide care for my child.
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Old 09-13-2016, 01:52 PM
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I definitely do not discount education as a positive thing, but I feel that a provider with experience is far more beneficial. I just look at education as a bonus, but as a parent, if it came down to a provider with years of actual hands on experience/confidence int heir ability, versus one with a degree who is new to the field, I would probably choose the veteran. There is so much they cannot teach you about many professions, but I think any education is great. It is just not something I look to when deciding on who to provide care for my child.

But as a parent, what you (general you*) want doesn't matter anymore.

The state/government is dictating what makes a program a quality program.

They don't really care what you* think.
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Old 09-13-2016, 02:04 PM
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But as a parent, what you (general you*) want doesn't matter anymore.

The state/government is dictating what makes a program a quality program.

They don't really care what you* think.
I completely agree, which is why I wonder why parents push so hard for "universal preschool" and what not. I know it is a money thing, but they are technically still paying for care, but they get far less control over what type of care is provided.

My son is in 1st grade and is having issues with reading. He is being given extra services to help and we are doing what we need to do at home to help him out. When I listen to him read, imo, he does really well. What I would expect from a kid his age, but according to the school, he is really behind and they are making me nervous with the implication of their words. The lack of control and the fact that he is one of many and has to keep an education timetable that is not fit for him makes me really upset. I couldn;t imagine pushing him into that environment any sooner.

(just an fyi...I think it is awesome for people to continue their education in whatever field they choose and it is certainly not something I look badly on by any means. The more experience, education, ect., the better off you will be! My earlier post was just stating that it would take more than a degree for me to trust your abilities as a provider, kwim? I think there is plenty of education to be had when it comes to children, but it is not rocket science in my book and I find that experience in the "trenches" so to speak, is one of the best ways to learn how children work. The education part can really offer up that textbook equation of child development, but seeing it in action is what seems to ingrain it into my mind.
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Old 09-13-2016, 02:07 PM
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I completely agree, which is why I wonder why parents push so hard for "universal preschool" and what not. I know it is a money thing, but they are technically still paying for care, but they get far less control over what type of care is provided.

My son is in 1st grade and is having issues with reading. He is being given extra services to help and we are doing what we need to do at home to help him out. When I listen to him read, imo, he does really well. What I would expect from a kid his age, but according to the school, he is really behind and they are making me nervous with the implication of their words. The lack of control and the fact that he is one of many and has to keep an education timetable that is not fit for him makes me really upset. I couldn;t imagine pushing him into that environment any sooner.

(just an fyi...I think it is awesome for people to continue their education in whatever field they choose and it is certainly not something I look badly on by any means. The more experience, education, ect., the better off you will be! My earlier post was just stating that it would take more than a degree for me to trust your abilities as a provider, kwim? I think there is plenty of education to be had when it comes to children, but it is not rocket science in my book and I find that experience in the "trenches" so to speak, is one of the best ways to learn how children work. The education part can really offer up that textbook equation of child development, but seeing it in action is what seems to ingrain it into my mind.
I agree!

Finally an article that supports BOTH care and education and the important each has at the "right" time.

http://www.daycare.com/forum/showthread.php?t=83985
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