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  #1  
Old 01-08-2013, 08:40 PM
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Starburst Starburst is offline
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Question Do You Tell Clients The Provider/Parents/Children's Rights During An Interview?

Hi, I have been responding off an on here for a while and decided to just open an account because this forum seems very helpful and I think I can learn alot from it

I am currently in junior college trying to get an AA and certificates in Child Development and planning on getting married, moving, and opening a home daycare hopefully with in the next year or so (God willing lol) I used to work for someone who ran a home daycare for over 35 years but lost touch with them when I moved.

Anyway I've had some free time lately between semesters and decided to start working on my contract/policies handbook. And after reading about a lot of your issues with daycare parents I have been thinking about maybe posting either in my daycare, on my website, or in the begining of my handbook the legal rights of the provider, the parent, and the child; so that they understand what my legal rights are as a business owner and child care provider (such as changing my fees, hours, services, rules, etc.) and what their and their child's rights are and go over this with them when they are signing up.

I got to doing it and starting thinking maybe it comes off as too strong and maybe they won't read it anyway so maybe I should just post it in my daycare/on my website (if even that) and not bother going over it in the interview because some parents may be scared off or not even listen to it. IDK I just try to have as much as possible in writing so there is not miscommunication.

Does anyone else do this? If so did it scare anyone off or still have issues?

Last edited by Starburst; 01-08-2013 at 09:23 PM. Reason: grammer/icon errors
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Old 01-08-2013, 08:52 PM
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Welcome to the Daycare.com Forum! I've upgraded your status. You can post freely now.
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Old 01-08-2013, 09:22 PM
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I wish I could help. It seems even y best parents don't read my handbook and usually find out about a policy when they try to break it.

them: "I forgot my checkbook, I'll swing by tomorrow to pay"
me: "Thank you for letting me know, please remember to add $10 for the late fee."

them: "I'm so sorry, I know I was supposed to pick up Michael 5 minutes ago but I'm running late. I will be there in about 15 minutes."
me: Thank you for the call. Make sure to bring $20 with you for the late pick up fee. It adds up so quick at $1 a minute."

If I see a parent hinting about potty training a child I know isn't ready I tell them to try it over the weekend and see how they do. The parent either comes on Monday and exclaims that the child was definitely not ready or they tell me how great they did. When they tell me how great the child did I ask for details. Every time I'm told the "I took them to the potty every 20 minutes, took of their clothes and sat them on the potty. They eventually went!" Then I give it a few days and the parents end up realizing for themselves that they are trained and not the child and they give up.
etc. etc.

As for holiday pay I always post reminders that say something like, "please remember I will be closed this Monday and Tuesday for two of my paid holiday days".

I'm obviously not an aggressive person so I deal with things differently than others but it works for me. Just do what works for you but make your contracts to the point because it seems to me like a lot of parents don't even read them until they have a problem.
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Old 01-09-2013, 05:19 AM
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blandino blandino is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nanglgrl View Post
I wish I could help. It seems even y best parents don't read my handbook and usually find out about a policy when they try to break it.

them: "I forgot my checkbook, I'll swing by tomorrow to pay"
me: "Thank you for letting me know, please remember to add $10 for the late fee."

them: "I'm so sorry, I know I was supposed to pick up Michael 5 minutes ago but I'm running late. I will be there in about 15 minutes."
me: Thank you for the call. Make sure to bring $20 with you for the late pick up fee. It adds up so quick at $1 a minute."

If I see a parent hinting about potty training a child I know isn't ready I tell them to try it over the weekend and see how they do. The parent either comes on Monday and exclaims that the child was definitely not ready or they tell me how great they did. When they tell me how great the child did I ask for details. Every time I'm told the "I took them to the potty every 20 minutes, took of their clothes and sat them on the potty. They eventually went!" Then I give it a few days and the parents end up realizing for themselves that they are trained and not the child and they give up.
etc. etc.

As for holiday pay I always post reminders that say something like, "please remember I will be closed this Monday and Tuesday for two of my paid holiday days".

I'm obviously not an aggressive person so I deal with things differently than others but it works for me. Just do what works for you but make your contracts to the point because it seems to me like a lot of parents don't even read them until they have a problem.
I am not aggressive either, but you HAVE to handle things the way you described. If you don't, people will walk all over you. You don't have to be rude, just very point blank and say the things that you wouldn't normally want to actually say.

Definitely agree on the potty training. I do the exact same thing. Even if I know the child is far from ready I say "okay, we'll pick a weekend and try it out and if they do well we can continue here the following week". Making it look like I am open to the idea, even when I'm not, keeps parents happy - and they will soon find out that their child is (in most cases) far from ready. We have very firm rules established about potty training, and my role in training doesn't waver depending on the readiness of the child. So a parent with a child who is no where near ready can attempt as muh as they like - but they need to be doing x,y, and z to be trained here. So it's really no skin off my back.
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  #5  
Old 01-09-2013, 02:43 PM
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Question Maybe I wasnt clear enough...

I dont think anyone understood my question..... I was just asking if you think its a good Idea to have like a list of the legal rights of the provider, the parent, and the child available to the parents so that they aren't afraid to ask questions and know what I am legally able to do at my business. Here is an example of some things I have so far (I tried to make sure they match my states regulations):

Rights of All Parties
Provider’s rights:
The provider has the right to change any policies, times/days of service, daily schedule/routines, and fees at any time. The provider has the right not to get involved in disputes between daycare families. The provider also has the right not to be involved in custody battles or separation/divorce issues-in these cases the provider will only enforce legal court orders. The provider has the right to require children under the age of 5 to rest on a mat or cot and children over 5 to do a silent activity or rest on a mat during quiet time, also known as nap time. The provider has the right to refuse to implement any punishments given by the parent at home for an incident that happened out of the daycare. The provider has the right to prohibit, limit, or remove a drop-off/pick-up contact if they cause a disturbance; show disrespect to the provider/provider’s family, staff, other children/families; or violate daycare rules. The provider has the right to limit or prohibit outside food from the daycare home. The provider has the right to own pets as long as they have their shots and are not pose a safety issue to the children. The provider has the right to privacy and confidentiality between them and the parents. The provider has the right not to share personal information with daycare families and to not talk about a daycare child/ family with another family. The provider has the right to charge families different tuition/rates for multiple reasons. The provider has the right and is obligated (as mandated reporter) to report any suspected abuse or neglect. The provider has the right to prohibit any types of discipline on the daycare property (including the yard, drive way, and curb in front of the daycare home). The provider has the right to request a review or testimonial (anonymous) of the child care home to use as suggestions towards growth or as advertisement for the business. The provider has the right to limit, eliminate, or deny certain special/additional services. The provider has the right to expand or reduce their child care license capacity. The provider has the right to hire assistants or substitutes. The child care provider has the right to restrict or change age groups admitted into daycare home. The provider has the right to limit or restrict any and all privileges for behavioral issues. The provider has the right to ban or prohibit toys from home and other things that may be distractive to children in the child care home. The provider has the right to cancel events such as field trips or parent specials due to low sign up, payment/policy issues, or any other reason-refunds may not be given back if parents have late fee/payments that are not paid.The provider has the right to charge for extra services and specials on weekend or after of daycare hours.

The provider reserves the right to terminate at any time for any reason with a two week notice or immediately. The provider has the right not to offer refunds, credits, or discounts. The provider has the right to put a family on probation for any reason. The provider has the right to exercise a “No pay, no play” policy. The provider has the right to not offer after hours/weekend care and to not offer extras such as parents special/field trips if there is an issue with payment, behavior issues, or policy violations. The provider has the right to limit the amount or age group for parent specials/field trips depending on the nature of the activities and for the safety of all children involved. The provider has the right to post any information related to the laws, regulations, and/or studies based on child development, education, or child disciplinary techniques. The provider has the right to share and/or not to share personal cultural/religious/political beliefs with daycare families. The provider has the right to observe and assess as well as chart the child’s development with an age appropriate Desired Results Development Profile (DRDP). The provider has the right to request and schedule regular (once or twice a year) in person or phone conferences (no charge) before, during, or after daycare hours, as well as weekends, to discuss and share finding with parents.

Parent/Legal guardian’s/ Primary caregiver’s rights:
Primary caregivers have the right to terminate the services at any time with at least a two week notice to the provider- but still are required to pay for any leftover fees and pay for last 2 weeks whether child attends or not. The parent/guardian has the right to visit the child during daycare hours; please see ‘open door policy’ for more information. Parents and guardians have the right to review curriculum. Primary caregivers have the right to talk to the provider about any concerns or issues they have regarding the payment, curriculum, and any other concerns regarding services provided at this child care. A legal/birth parent or guardian has the legal right to see or pick up their child unless their rights have been relinquished by a legal court order; in which I will need a copy of any documents. The parent/guardian has the right to privacy and confidentiality between them and the provider. The parent/guardian has the right to give the provider permission to share any private information with another provider. Breastfeeding mothers have the right to provide breast milk or visit to nurse for their infant during contract hours in the nursery/infant room or any designated room in the child care home.

Parents/guardians have the right to volunteer for field trips or other daycare functions as long as they pay for any admission fees that may apply and follow daycare rules. The guardian has a right to schedule an appointment after hour or during the weekend (depending on provider’s availability) to discuss any concerns they have about their child or the daycare. The parent has the right to disciple their own child in the child care as long as it does not violate the child’s rights stated below. The guardian has the right to designate an adult over the age of 18 years old to pick up the child on an emergency call cards. The primary caregiver has the right to share and/or not to share personal cultural/religious/political beliefs with the provider- please be aware that while you are free to share any personal beliefs or opinions with the provider and other families that does not give you the right to push your own beliefs or put down/undermine the beliefs of others in the daycare.

Child’s rights:
The child has the right to play, grow, and learn in a warm, safe, and consistent environment with as minimal distractions as possible. All children in the providers care during nap time the right to an uninterrupted 2 hour rest period provided daily in the daycare home regardless of age, optional for children over age 5. All children in the provider’s care have the right to solid schedules and routines with minimal distractions. The child has the right to an emotionally safe environment free from discrimination, fear, humiliation, patronizing, neglect, and exposure to violence, physical punishment, and all forms of abuse while in my care. The child has the right to confidentiality between them and the provider.

***************************************
I haven't completed it yet I was just wondering would you think this is overwhelming or helpful to a parent who is new to child care?
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  #6  
Old 01-09-2013, 02:47 PM
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Michael Michael is online now
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Great sample content, Thanks!
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Old 01-09-2013, 04:01 PM
Willow Willow is offline
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I think when you state them as rights and are overly repetitious it does come off a little harsh.

If you're interested I'd be willing to pm you my parent handbook so you can see exactly what you're trying to get across, just with a slightly different presentation


As to your question of when to present them I leave mine in the handbook and only pass it out if parents are genuinely interested in enrolling.....so after interview, but before I'll accept an admissions form. I require all parents read the handbook and sign an agreement to terms form before I consider a family open to enroll.
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Old 01-09-2013, 04:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willow View Post
I think when you state them as rights and are overly repetitious it does come off a little harsh.

If you're interested I'd be willing to pm you my parent handbook so you can see exactly what you're trying to get across, just with a slightly different presentation
i love your approach willow....as you said before, you catch more flies with honey than you do with vinegar.....

lol did I say it right??
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Old 01-09-2013, 04:06 PM
Willow Willow is offline
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i love your approach willow....as you said before, you catch more flies with honey than you do with vinegar.....

lol did I say it right??
Absolutely!
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Old 01-09-2013, 04:11 PM
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Absolutely!
and they say my English is bad.....hahahhha
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  #11  
Old 01-09-2013, 04:57 PM
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Starburst Starburst is offline
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Post I know sometimes things do come out harsher in print than explained in person

I ment it as their legal rights that everyone envolved is entitled to legally, I just ment that I have the right to exercise these practices but that doesn't mean I am going to change my fee every week (as I would make clear if I were to go over it with them).

I think I may just put it up and post it somewhere in my daycare so it is available to the parents so if they have questions about what I am allowed to do or if something that I am doing is legal it would save them hours of trying to look it up in Title 22 (we had to go over it in a previous class and it is a really long and sometimes even hard to find things). But I am still going to work on it. Thanks for the imput.
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Old 01-10-2013, 10:09 AM
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In MI we have to give each parent the actual licensing rules book when they enroll. This makes it easy for the parents to know exactly what the state looks for and what is required of us to be licensed. As for the "personal rights" that are particular to your daycare, I have written them in sections of my handbook. For example, I have a section on bringing toys from home, one on changing fees, etc...
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