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  #1  
Old 08-01-2018, 09:05 AM
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acemanhattan acemanhattan is offline
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Default Centers: What is Your Capacity and Total Square Footage?

I'm interested to know your maximum capacity, and how many square feet your center is, so I can get an estimate of average square foot per child at your center.

This will obviously be different for everyone, but I want to get a ballpark.

Thanks in advance!
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Old 08-01-2018, 09:33 AM
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Originally Posted by acemanhattan View Post
I'm interested to know your maximum capacity, and how many square feet your center is, so I can get an estimate of average square foot per child at your center.

This will obviously be different for everyone, but I want to get a ballpark.

Thanks in advance!
Here its square foot per child. 75 sqft per kid.
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Old 08-01-2018, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by amberrose3dg View Post
Here its square foot per child. 75 sqft per kid.
Thanks for the response. I'm not looking for your state regulations, though. I want to know your ACTUAL SF/Child.

I am assuming that for most people their actual SF/Child is going to be larger than what the state requires, I just want to know how much larger, on average.
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Old 08-01-2018, 05:49 PM
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why do you need this information?
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Old 08-01-2018, 06:09 PM
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why do you need this information?
For forecasting purposes.
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Old 08-02-2018, 10:46 PM
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For forecasting purposes.
good luck! )
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Old 08-03-2018, 09:19 AM
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Originally Posted by acemanhattan View Post
Thanks for the response. I'm not looking for your state regulations, though. I want to know your ACTUAL SF/Child.

I am assuming that for most people their actual SF/Child is going to be larger than what the state requires, I just want to know how much larger, on average.
Not every center (or home for that matter) has more space than what the state requires; it depends on your building, outside play area etc. Inner city regulations might vary from rural even in same state... so as previous poster stated; good luck
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Old 08-03-2018, 07:39 PM
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Not every center (or home for that matter) has more space than what the state requires; it depends on your building, outside play area etc. Inner city regulations might vary from rural even in same state... so as previous poster stated; good luck
Help me understand the bolded. If the state requires, say, 35SF/Child, are you telling me it's common for centers or homes to have less than that? That's illegal, isn't it?

This is why I assume most people have more than required; the MINIMUM they could have is the state requirement, so most people will have more than the state requires on a per child basis.
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Old 08-03-2018, 08:42 PM
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Originally Posted by acemanhattan View Post
Help me understand the bolded. If the state requires, say, 35SF/Child, are you telling me it's common for centers or homes to have less than that? That's illegal, isn't it?

This is why I assume most people have more than required; the MINIMUM they could have is the state requirement, so most people will have more than the state requires on a per child basis.
We all have more space when a building is empty, however it's how much furniture & unusable areas that will count against # of kids allowed; you could go absolutely minimum on requirements for toys, furniture etc & have more kids... or you could make it a nicer play and sleep area with lower #'s. Nobody said we didn't have less space than required, it's just how many kids they allow in the actual open areas they look at; it varies based on the building and how you set it up...

You have to remember that 35 sq ft requirement inside is space not taken up by bathrooms, kitchens, furniture, set up cribs that don't get put down, offices for employees etc.

You buy a building that has a huge indoor area, but after everything is set up it might be that you technically won't get the revenue you thought you would because of all the furniture and off limit areas... you planned on taking 100 kids when in reality, licensing may only say you can have 84... or worse, say your building can do the 100, but the outdoor space can only qualify for 75 due to sq footage... guess which one you get licensed for?

It really depends on how a space is set up - there is no one size fits all when it comes to extra space needed
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Old 08-03-2018, 09:35 PM
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Originally Posted by LysesKids View Post
We all have more space when a building is empty, however it's how much furniture & unusable areas that will count against # of kids allowed; you could go absolutely minimum on requirements for toys, furniture etc & have more kids... or you could make it a nicer play and sleep area with lower #'s. Nobody said we didn't have less space than required, it's just how many kids they allow in the actual open areas they look at; it varies based on the building and how you set it up...

You have to remember that 35 sq ft requirement inside is space not taken up by bathrooms, kitchens, furniture, set up cribs that don't get put down, offices for employees etc.

You buy a building that has a huge indoor area, but after everything is set up it might be that you technically won't get the revenue you thought you would because of all the furniture and off limit areas... you planned on taking 100 kids when in reality, licensing may only say you can have 84... or worse, say your building can do the 100, but the outdoor space can only qualify for 75 due to sq footage... guess which one you get licensed for?

It really depends on how a space is set up - there is no one size fits all when it comes to extra space needed
Yes, I know This is precisely why I askes the question. Because I want to estimate how much "wasted" or "unusable" sq/ft you all are averaging.
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Old 08-04-2018, 03:14 PM
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In Kansas it is 35 square feet per child and our center was built to those specs. So if a room has 10 kids it is 350 square feet.

When the center was built we were able to count the (attached) bathroom as square feet in the room. If we were ever to decide to change how our rooms are licensed and apply for changes we would lose spots.....

Lori
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Old 08-05-2018, 04:02 PM
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In Kansas it is 35 square feet per child and our center was built to those specs. So if a room has 10 kids it is 350 square feet.

When the center was built we were able to count the (attached) bathroom as square feet in the room. If we were ever to decide to change how our rooms are licensed and apply for changes we would lose spots.....

Lori
Do you mean you'd lose spots as a result of the bathrooms no longer counting? When did you have your center built?
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Old 08-06-2018, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by acemanhattan View Post
Help me understand the bolded. If the state requires, say, 35SF/Child, are you telling me it's common for centers or homes to have less than that? That's illegal, isn't it?

This is why I assume most people have more than required; the MINIMUM they could have is the state requirement, so most people will have more than the state requires on a per child basis.
No. Many have the exact amount required, or a teensy bit more. It makes the most fiscal sense.
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Old 08-06-2018, 08:57 AM
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Yes, I know This is precisely why I askes the question. Because I want to estimate how much "wasted" or "unusable" sq/ft you all are averaging.
It's what I tried to tell you... most of us run right at the limit without excess; that goes for homes & centers. Bathrooms & kitchens in centers are considered unusable for play space, but are used for the business, but as for having unused rooms/areas in the building - I wouldn't do it. It doesn't make sense financially.
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Old 08-06-2018, 11:27 AM
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Originally Posted by LysesKids View Post
It's what I tried to tell you... most of us run right at the limit without excess; that goes for homes & centers. Bathrooms & kitchens in centers are considered unusable for play space, but are used for the business, but as for having unused rooms/areas in the building - I wouldn't do it. It doesn't make sense financially.
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Originally Posted by hwichlaz View Post
No. Many have the exact amount required, or a teensy bit more. It makes the most fiscal sense.
It's clear I'm not communicating my question well. Of course you wouldn't just let usable space go unused, this makes zero sense, and isn't what I'm suggesting or asking about.

Stated otherwise, I want to know, of your total building's square footage, how much is unusable in calculating ratios (bathrooms, storage spaces, large equipment like desks)? Is it...10%, 20%, 50%?
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  #16  
Old 08-15-2018, 11:50 AM
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Yes, if we applied for any changes in our licensing and they remeasured we would only be able to have 10 kids in each room instead of the 12 we have now.

Our center was built in 1994.


Quote:
Originally Posted by satcook View Post
In Kansas it is 35 square feet per child and our center was built to those specs. So if a room has 10 kids it is 350 square feet.

When the center was built we were able to count the (attached) bathroom as square feet in the room. If we were ever to decide to change how our rooms are licensed and apply for changes we would lose spots.....

Lori
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