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Laurel 04:19 AM 01-27-2014
I am 62 and am thinking of retiring this year. However, I am torn.

My two provider friends are also retiring. One is married and her husband is also retiring. I am married and my husband would not be retiring yet and one is single and is retiring.

In some ways I want to and in some ways I don't. Help me decide!!!

Pros:

-Get rid of all the baby things in my house and have a regular house again.

-Get rid of occasional backaches from lifting.

-Be able to go to dr's appointments and such without a major hassle.

-Not working long hours (mine are 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.)

Cons:

-After a brief honeymoon period, lol, I'm thinking I might be bored outta my skull. I can hang out with my 2 friends but one is going to do a lot of traveling with her husband and the single one is still going to be watching her grandchild 3 days a week (I will watch mine 2 days a week). All 3 of us will still keep our one girl's night out a week though, for sure.

-Feeling a little guilty for not bringing in some money/contributing, etc. My husband doesn't seem to care but it kind of bothers me. I have considered another part time job but really don't have many marketable skills and would probably make more money watching a child or two. Plus who is going to hire a 62year old? I mean I could try but let's be realistic here, ahem....

I am also trying to think of some ways to do childcare part time. I have one child now that comes 3 days a week. I guess I could specialize in part-time maybe??? I think I really want some more free time and shorter hours more than anything. I did go down from watching 6 to now taking 3 although I have 4 now. Got suckered into one more, lol.

Aaacckkk, can't decide! Help!

Laurel
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Mike 06:06 AM 01-27-2014
Sounds to me like part time is what you want. Go for that, then maybe in another year retire.
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Patches 06:08 AM 01-27-2014
If you decide not to retire just yet, I think going to part time only would be a good option. Also, you might think about getting a part time job at a daycare center. They usually need floaters or breakers.
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Maria2013 06:09 AM 01-27-2014
if you can afford the loss of income, I'd say go ahead and retire, there are plenty of things to do to kill boredom if one has money and time
.....but if you will suffer the loss of income, and already anticipate being bored, then I'll suggest cutting down on days more than number of children....anyway that's what I would do

good luck on your decision
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slorey 06:13 AM 01-27-2014
What about doing a half day preschool program? That would solve all the problems you listed on your pros list, while still allowing you to contribute to the household. If there isn't a market for that type of care where you are, I think the best option would be to do part time all day care. Good luck in your decision!
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Play Care 06:21 AM 01-27-2014
I never understood the whole "I'll be bored if I'm not working" school of thought. I would love to have "free" time to volunteer - at the library, schools, day care, hospital, etc. Take some classes - our local library is always offering something and the bonus is they are free (or a small donation) I know you watch your grand kids, I think it would be nice to just be grandma who babysits on occasion rather then "grandma daycare."
If you wanted to still watch some kids on occasion to get some cash, you could advertise as an occasional day sitter or maybe as a back up care provider.
Good luck with whatever you decide!
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JenNJ 06:30 AM 01-27-2014
You could market yourself to families who have short days or two days a week. Be a boutique daycare!
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Evansmom 07:12 AM 01-27-2014
I agree with slorey and JenNJ, just do part time if that's what you want to do. If you did a preschool you could have hours of MWF from 8-12 or 9-12 (serve snack but no lunch) and get rid of all the baby stuff since you'll have older kids. You'd have to have a curriculum tho, that's pretty easy to do in my opinion.

Or like JenNJ said, make your niche part time care only. It's hard for parents to find part time care as you know. There might be quite a few families who would jump at the chance to pay for part time only.

Personally though I'm looking forward to doing other things with my time when I'm finished raising kids. I have a fledgling meditation practice I'd love to work on, tons of books I'd like to read, hiking in the mountains we are moving to soon, volunteer work, learning new things maybe if you give yourself some time to think about it you'd find there are lots of things you want to explore too.
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Blackcat31 07:21 AM 01-27-2014
Have you considered being a substitute?

Many area providers don't have back up or substitutes. Perhaps you could market yourself as a sub (you have ALL the training etc) for area providers.

If they all have your number you could have them book you in advance for whatever days/hours they need.

I bet providers in your area would love having a back up they can count on and one who really knows the ins and outs of running a child care on a daily basis.
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Sugar Magnolia 08:12 AM 01-27-2014
Well, if you do retire......you're already in Florida.
Actually, I'd like to summer in New England and winter in Florida.
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kathiemarie 08:52 AM 01-27-2014
Originally Posted by Play Care:
I never understood the whole "I'll be bored if I'm not working" school of thought. I would love to have "free" time to volunteer - at the library, schools, day care, hospital, etc. Take some classes - our local library is always offering something and the bonus is they are free (or a small donation) I know you watch your grand kids, I think it would be nice to just be grandma who babysits on occasion rather then "grandma daycare."
If you wanted to still watch some kids on occasion to get some cash, you could advertise as an occasional day sitter or maybe as a back up care provider.
Good luck with whatever you decide!
This or

Originally Posted by Blackcat31:
Have you considered being a substitute?

Many area providers don't have back up or substitutes. Perhaps you could market yourself as a sub (you have ALL the training etc) for area providers.

If they all have your number you could have them book you in advance for whatever days/hours they need.

I bet providers in your area would love having a back up they can count on and one who really knows the ins and outs of running a child care on a daily basis.
This.

I'm only 47 and have been thinking of stopping daycare also but we still need my income, college to help with, weddings, travel. I'm thinking about going back to school to brush up on my accounting skills but I REALLY hate school. ugh!!! Good luck.
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Evansmom 10:42 AM 01-27-2014
Originally Posted by Blackcat31:
Have you considered being a substitute?

Many area providers don't have back up or substitutes. Perhaps you could market yourself as a sub (you have ALL the training etc) for area providers.

If they all have your number you could have them book you in advance for whatever days/hours they need.

I bet providers in your area would love having a back up they can count on and one who really knows the ins and outs of running a child care on a daily basis.
This is a really good idea BC, how does that work with regards to licensing do you know? Like say your state requires you to be licensed when watching 2 or more children but if you're a substitute, you wouldn't have a facility to have the state come license right? Or does it matter, if you're just a sub?
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Blackcat31 10:48 AM 01-27-2014
Originally Posted by Evansmom:
This is a really good idea BC, how does that work with regards to licensing do you know? Like say your state requires you to be licensed when watching 2 or more children but if you're a substitute, you wouldn't have a facility to have the state come license right? Or does it matter, if you're just a sub?
To be a substitute provider in my state, you are not required to be licensed but you are required to have the trainings providers have. CPR, SIDS, shaken baby etc....

Also licensed providers in my state can only use a substitute a certain number of times per year. I think it's maybe 10 days.

They don't limit half days though.
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Evansmom 10:56 AM 01-27-2014
Thank you BC, I'll have to look up requirements in CO where we are moving.
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spinnymarie 11:04 AM 01-27-2014
Outside of subbing, another option would be emergency back up care - people call you when their own daycare is closed...
Not sure how that works with licensing though.
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butterfly 11:10 AM 01-27-2014
When it comes time for me to retire, I think I'd just not enroll any more clients. I'd allow the children to age out and then be done as the families leave. It would allow me to slowly transition out of it.

I also like the sub idea - my main concern with that is going into someone else's program. I'm very particular in how I like things done... I think it would drive me crazy to work in another environment and not really have any control over how things were run - especially considering I'd be there on such a rare occasion.
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Play Care 11:19 AM 01-27-2014
Originally Posted by spinnymarie:
Outside of subbing, another option would be emergency back up care - people call you when their own daycare is closed...
Not sure how that works with licensing though.
If she was just occasionally babysitting for a family she probably wouldn't need any license. Especially if she went to their house.
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Laurel 05:42 PM 01-27-2014
Originally Posted by slorey:
What about doing a half day preschool program? That would solve all the problems you listed on your pros list, while still allowing you to contribute to the household. If there isn't a market for that type of care where you are, I think the best option would be to do part time all day care. Good luck in your decision!
That would be great but in our state we have voluntary pre kindergarten paid for by the state for 4 year olds. I doubt there would be anyone who would pay for a 4year old when they can get it free. I could do it in my home but I have to have a minimum number of children and do it five days a week.

Laurel
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Laurel 05:44 PM 01-27-2014
Originally Posted by JenNJ:
You could market yourself to families who have short days or two days a week. Be a boutique daycare!
That is such a cute way to put it...a boutique daycare. I bet that would actually work too.

Laurel
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Laurel 05:50 PM 01-27-2014
Originally Posted by Blackcat31:
Have you considered being a substitute?

Many area providers don't have back up or substitutes. Perhaps you could market yourself as a sub (you have ALL the training etc) for area providers.

If they all have your number you could have them book you in advance for whatever days/hours they need.

I bet providers in your area would love having a back up they can count on and one who really knows the ins and outs of running a child care on a daily basis.
I have considered it. That is an idea. I have done it for my provider friend when she had a death in the family. Later I found out it probably wasn't legal cause I wasn't listed as her sub. Luckily everything went okay though. Here even if you are a licensed provider (which I am and I must be) doesn't mean I can do it in someone elses house even though her house is also up to licensing regulations. Kinda dumb really. I'm approved, her house is approved but my license is for me to watch children in MY house.

Also I have subbed for her but the children came to my house. I'd prefer that. I could contact other providers and be their back up but the families would have to come to my house.

Laurel
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Laurel 05:55 PM 01-27-2014
Originally Posted by Play Care:
I never understood the whole "I'll be bored if I'm not working" school of thought. I would love to have "free" time to volunteer - at the library, schools, day care, hospital, etc. Take some classes - our local library is always offering something and the bonus is they are free (or a small donation) I know you watch your grand kids, I think it would be nice to just be grandma who babysits on occasion rather then "grandma daycare."
If you wanted to still watch some kids on occasion to get some cash, you could advertise as an occasional day sitter or maybe as a back up care provider.
Good luck with whatever you decide!
Yes, I went through that train of thought also. Before my mom died she said "Work as long as you can cause you'll get bored." I guess it is stuck in my head.

I do have a 'to do' list in my head. Join a gym, take some classes, do volunteer work, take naps , and yes, be just a grandma.

When mine were little I didn't do daycare. I was just a stay at home mom. I found plenty to do so now I could be a stay at home grandma I guess. I remember baking a lot of nut breads back then and taking some college classes.

Laurel
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Laurel 05:59 PM 01-27-2014
Originally Posted by spinnymarie:
Outside of subbing, another option would be emergency back up care - people call you when their own daycare is closed...
Not sure how that works with licensing though.
I do know the procedure for our area. I would have to be a 'floating sub' so I could work in more than one family child care home. I'd rather not do that. I'd rather say something like "I am available on Tuesdays and Thursdays at my house for backup care if you need to take off." I'd rather have families come to me. Oh no, but then I'd have to keep my license current. That would be a pain. I can only watch one child or two that are related without a license. Bummer.

Laurel
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Laurel 06:00 PM 01-27-2014
Originally Posted by Play Care:
If she was just occasionally babysitting for a family she probably wouldn't need any license. Especially if she went to their house.
No, no license if I went to their house. Now if they were already a family child care provider then I'd have to get paperwork to be their sub.

Laurel
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Laurel 06:01 PM 01-27-2014
Originally Posted by Sugar Magnolia:
Well, if you do retire......you're already in Florida.
Actually, I'd like to summer in New England and winter in Florida.
That's what I said when I moved here 18 years ago!!!

Laurel
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Sugar Magnolia 06:08 PM 01-27-2014
Originally Posted by Laurel:
That's what I said when I moved here 18 years ago!!!

Laurel
Yep, I've been in the State myself 30 of my 46 years...and never going back.
I just want an RV, a cabin in VT where I grew up and a double wide in a 55 and up park down here.
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Sunchimes 07:21 PM 01-28-2014
You mentioned feeling bad about not bringing in any money, but at 62, you can start drawing your social security. Depending on how much you've paid in, it would be money coming it without having to do daycare.
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Laurel 08:00 PM 01-28-2014
Originally Posted by Sunchimes:
You mentioned feeling bad about not bringing in any money, but at 62, you can start drawing your social security. Depending on how much you've paid in, it would be money coming it without having to do daycare.
True, I have kind of checked into that. It wouldn't bring in much. It would bring in more if my husband would retire and I could take from his.

But yes, it is something at least.

Laurel
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Laurel 08:03 PM 01-28-2014
Originally Posted by Sugar Magnolia:
Yep, I've been in the State myself 30 of my 46 years...and never going back.
I just want an RV, a cabin in VT where I grew up and a double wide in a 55 and up park down here.
We have 55 and up communities here but quite a few years ago it became illegal to just sell them to ages 55 and up. Now anyone can buy them. They make good starter homes for newly married couples. We chose to live in a regular community with all ages.

Just saying....I realize you were being light hearted!!

Laurel
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