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  #1  
Old 07-23-2017, 03:16 PM
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Default New Sibling Set Ruined My Baby Gate And Curtain Rod Today

Siblings 3y 2y boys ruined my baby gate (plastic, 3 panel kind) and my tension-mounted curtain rod today. One purposefully ran into the gate several times and the other one intentionally pulled on the curtains and the rod came down 3x in the last 2 days. (I currently work weekends).

The baby gate is $120 new and a curtain rod is like $20-$40. Would you have her pay some or all? I truly consider this more than normal wear and tear.....
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Old 07-23-2017, 04:20 PM
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I'd get in touch with the parents immediately and let them know, in a calm and non-accusatory way, that their kids irreparably damaged your baby gate and curtain rod, and that it will cost X to replace them.

I'd expect to lose the family over it, but I'd rather have them gone. So you'll have to assess whether you can afford to lose the income. . . and whether you can afford to keep them if this behavior continues.

I would also have removed the curtain rod the first time it was pulled down. I don't have curtains hanging low where toddlers can reach them. The gate is a bigger deal; I have to ensure the safety of the kids in my care, so if the kids are determined to leave the day care area, I can't do my job.
  • Are they brand-new to your program? Was this their first time at your place?
  • What were the consequences of tearing up your stuff, and how did they respond to those consequences?
  • Were they likewise abusing other objects, like toys or dishes or furniture?
I'd ask myself all those questions so I'd know whether I was even willing to let these kids stay, and so I'd be prepared for this in the future. After having had an experience like yours--a 20mo who destroyed several toys, deliberately, over just a few minutes--I added this to my contract:

Regular wear-and-tear to toys, furniture, materials, and the house itself is expected and you will not be charged. If your child willfully damages property at the day care, you
may be charged to repair/replace the damaged item.
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Old 07-23-2017, 05:47 PM
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I had siblings for a day that were very destructive. I did not invite them back for day #2. I did not ask parents to pay for damage, and it was about $500. They had ridiculous behavior.

I did not trust my instinct on that one.
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Old 07-23-2017, 07:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Pestle View Post
I'd get in touch with the parents immediately and let them know, in a calm and non-accusatory way, that their kids irreparably damaged your baby gate and curtain rod, and that it will cost X to replace them.

I'd expect to lose the family over it, but I'd rather have them gone. So you'll have to assess whether you can afford to lose the income. . . and whether you can afford to keep them if this behavior continues.

I would also have removed the curtain rod the first time it was pulled down. I don't have curtains hanging low where toddlers can reach them. The gate is a bigger deal; I have to ensure the safety of the kids in my care, so if the kids are determined to leave the day care area, I can't do my job.
  • Are they brand-new to your program? Was this their first time at your place?
  • What were the consequences of tearing up your stuff, and how did they respond to those consequences?
  • Were they likewise abusing other objects, like toys or dishes or furniture?
I'd ask myself all those questions so I'd know whether I was even willing to let these kids stay, and so I'd be prepared for this in the future. After having had an experience like yours--a 20mo who destroyed several toys, deliberately, over just a few minutes--I added this to my contract:

Regular wear-and-tear to toys, furniture, materials, and the house itself is expected and you will not be charged. If your child willfully damages property at the day care, you
may be charged to repair/replace the damaged item.
I do infants & younger toddlers only; that said, I do have a policy in place that states parents will be required to pay for purposely damaged toys, personal items or any property damage done whether it is my own or another families if done by an older sibling or family member of an infant in care (under 18 months usually don't destroy things). I only had to charge one family & then I terminated care when they refused to pay (that was in 2004 and it was for a floor mattress that a preschooler decided to pee on for spite because mom was talking to me about the little)
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Old 07-24-2017, 07:05 AM
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I would never ask a parent to pay for something that happened on your watch.

Maybe in a very rare circumstance but certainly not for child(ren) in the 2-3 yr age range.
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Old 07-24-2017, 09:00 AM
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I would never ask a parent to pay for something that happened on your watch.

Maybe in a very rare circumstance but certainly not for child(ren) in the 2-3 yr age range.
I agree with this.

It's my responsibility to stop those behaviors. If I can't manage to get a child to stop doing destructive things...then their parent needs to come and get them. Curtains should not be within reach of children that will pull on them...and after the first ram into the baby gate I would have put a stop to it. If I was unable, they'd have needed to be picked up.
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Old 07-24-2017, 09:44 AM
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Originally Posted by hwichlaz View Post
I agree with this.

It's my responsibility to stop those behaviors. If I can't manage to get a child to stop doing destructive things...then their parent needs to come and get them. Curtains should not be within reach of children that will pull on them...and after the first ram into the baby gate I would have put a stop to it. If I was unable, they'd have needed to be picked up.
Yup. I agree. I had a child who smashed a window with a plastic hammer once. He was 2. Thankfully no one was hurt but I did tell dcm what happened (kinda had to tell all families as to why my living room window was shattered lol). I did not say she had to pay, she felt awful and insisted on paying anyways lol. We settled on spilting it only because she really wanted to help cover the cost. But bottom line was it happened on my watch, it was my responsibility.
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Old 07-24-2017, 09:51 AM
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Originally Posted by trix23 View Post
Siblings 3y 2y boys ruined my baby gate (plastic, 3 panel kind) and my tension-mounted curtain rod today. One purposefully ran into the gate several times and the other one intentionally pulled on the curtains and the rod came down 3x in the last 2 days. (I currently work weekends).

The baby gate is $120 new and a curtain rod is like $20-$40. Would you have her pay some or all? I truly consider this more than normal wear and tear.....
Oh yes, I would bill them for the items, at least some of the cost. When it effects the wallet, parents usually become motivated to get a handle on behavior issues. Supervision has nothing to do with it, I have had this kind of behavior happen right in front of me. In my experience, the kiddos usually start to mind the house rules once you enforce them and provide consequences. Inconsistency at home can sometimes hinder this and sometimes it is just plain personality. If they do not eventually adapt, and some never do, it is most likely not a good fit and probably never will be. The question is, are you willing to continually manage behavior such as this? Some providers will work with this behavior and some are not willing, it is really all personal preference.
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Old 07-24-2017, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by midaycare View Post
I had siblings for a day that were very destructive. I did not invite them back for day #2. I did not ask parents to pay for damage, and it was about $500. They had ridiculous behavior.

I did not trust my instinct on that one.
Wow!! What was destroyed for $500?? Eeks, 1 day and that happens? I've had kids make holes in walls, break safety gates, break toys galore, ripped a door of my TV cabinet, and even a CD player. I've never requested payment from a parent but did let them know what happened.
Very disheartening, very very disheartening to say the least.
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Old 07-24-2017, 10:20 AM
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Wow!! What was destroyed for $500?? Eeks, 1 day and that happens? I've had kids make holes in walls, break safety gates, break toys galore, ripped a door of my TV cabinet, and even a CD player. I've never requested payment from a parent but did let them know what happened.
Very disheartening, very very disheartening to say the least.
Dck took a train and smashed it through the wall. The walls weren't reinforced - just drywall - but it took some serious effort. I had to get the wall redrywalled. Took him about 2 seconds to do this. Then he took the same train, pleased by his first results, and made a huge nick in our log staircase rail. I've been open 3 years since then and never had a dck do that much damage. And I currently have a verrrrrry difficult dcb.
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  #11  
Old 07-24-2017, 12:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Mummy101 View Post
Oh yes, I would bill them for the items, at least some of the cost. When it effects the wallet, parents usually become motivated to get a handle on behavior issues. Supervision has nothing to do with it, I have had this kind of behavior happen right in front of me. In my experience, the kiddos usually start to mind the house rules once you enforce them and provide consequences. Inconsistency at home can sometimes hinder this and sometimes it is just plain personality. If they do not eventually adapt, and some never do, it is most likely not a good fit and probably never will be. The question is, are you willing to continually manage behavior such as this? Some providers will work with this behavior and some are not willing, it is really all personal preference.
This is how I feel about it.
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Old 07-24-2017, 05:51 PM
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I would never ask a parent to pay for something that happened on your watch.

Maybe in a very rare circumstance but certainly not for child(ren) in the 2-3 yr age range.
My thoughts too!
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Old 07-24-2017, 10:09 PM
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I had a child (known for being disruptive during pick up/drop off) slam my new security door into the stucco making a hole. DCD offered to find someone to repair it/pay for the damage but I declined, fixed it myself and wrote off the supplies.

Curious, how did the parents react when you told them of the damage?
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Old 07-25-2017, 06:24 AM
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I haven't mentioned it yet because I wanted to have a plan about if I was going to charge or not.

And to say that you wouldn't let it happen: well of course i wouldn't either! I was coming back from changing a baby's diaper when the older one ran into the gate twice as I was coming back into the room.

As for the curtains, these kids are old enough to know better ! I would expect that from a toddler, not a 2y or 3y. I'm redesigning my room to have stuff in front of the curtains when I get a new rod- there are French doors there going outside.

I need the $ right now but I also can't be having kids that are destroying my home. They are new and have been here a total of 6 days so far- now just doing Sat & Sun. (I know... slow times to be working weekends but I need it- charging $200 for both ~12hr days).
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Old 07-25-2017, 06:26 AM
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Their behavior is insane and if it improves with my methods, then I'll keep them (I'll try for 1-2 months before giving in unless I just can't).
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Old 07-25-2017, 07:13 AM
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I haven't mentioned it yet because I wanted to have a plan about if I was going to charge or not.

And to say that you wouldn't let it happen: well of course i wouldn't either! I was coming back from changing a baby's diaper when the older one ran into the gate twice as I was coming back into the room.

As for the curtains, these kids are old enough to know better ! I would expect that from a toddler, not a 2y or 3y. I'm redesigning my room to have stuff in front of the curtains when I get a new rod- there are French doors there going outside.

I need the $ right now but I also can't be having kids that are destroying my home. They are new and have been here a total of 6 days so far- now just doing Sat & Sun. (I know... slow times to be working weekends but I need it- charging $200 for both ~12hr days).
What is a toddler to you?
In many states that IS a toddler.

I know I have high expectations for my kiddos but even I don't expect perfect behavior at all times and certainly not when they have no control over what items are within reach. The FIRST time the curtain rod was pulled down would have been the LAST time it was accessible to them.
(easy solution).

It's not fair, reasonable or logical to simply assume that a child's age means they know or don't know how to behave in a certain way. That is just not reality. These are new children that you do not know. You are unable to predict their actions/behaviors and direct supervision is required to prevent this situation from occurring.

Saying you were coming back from changing a baby is like saying "I was not supervising them" in a sense ....I am NOT saying you weren't...I am telling you how that can be used against you.

I am required to provide supervision at ALL (sight or sound) and any child I know is 'tough' or gets into things (including those I don't know well yet) should not be left unsupervised or in a situation where they CAN do something they shouldn't.

Also curious, what did this older child run into the plastic baby gate with? It must have been something fairly heavy to do damage to a gate that was that expensive.

I have had several baby gates over my tenure as a provider and I can't say I've had any of them break due to being run into or even treated poorly (other than those mesh type gates but those are less than $10 anyways) and I do not have any heavy or large ride on toys inside that could potentially cause damage to my walls or furniture.

Please don't think I am trying to be harsh... I'm just trying to understand the situation.
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Old 07-25-2017, 10:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
What is a toddler to you?
In many states that IS a toddler.

I know I have high expectations for my kiddos but even I don't expect perfect behavior at all times and certainly not when they have no control over what items are within reach. The FIRST time the curtain rod was pulled down would have been the LAST time it was accessible to them.
(easy solution).

It's not fair, reasonable or logical to simply assume that a child's age means they know or don't know how to behave in a certain way. That is just not reality. These are new children that you do not know. You are unable to predict their actions/behaviors and direct supervision is required to prevent this situation from occurring.

Saying you were coming back from changing a baby is like saying "I was not supervising them" in a sense ....I am NOT saying you weren't...I am telling you how that can be used against you.

I am required to provide supervision at ALL (sight or sound) and any child I know is 'tough' or gets into things (including those I don't know well yet) should not be left unsupervised or in a situation where they CAN do something they shouldn't.

Also curious, what did this older child run into the plastic baby gate with? It must have been something fairly heavy to do damage to a gate that was that expensive.

I have had several baby gates over my tenure as a provider and I can't say I've had any of them break due to being run into or even treated poorly (other than those mesh type gates but those are less than $10 anyways) and I do not have any heavy or large ride on toys inside that could potentially cause damage to my walls or furniture.

Please don't think I am trying to be harsh... I'm just trying to understand the situation.
That is good advice, I have learned (the hard way) to put my mischief makers securely at the table for an activity during diapering or meal prep etc.
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Old 07-25-2017, 11:04 AM
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I know I have high expectations for my kiddos but even I don't expect perfect behavior at all times and certainly not when they have no control over what items are within reach. The FIRST time the curtain rod was pulled down would have been the LAST time it was accessible to them.
(easy solution).
The only thing I donít agree with is altering the surroundings to prevent misbehavior. I want my kiddos to adapt to the rules of the house, not the rules of the house to adapt to their whims. To me, removing the problem in a way condones the behavior. I would rather teach self-regulation and consequences for decisions made. (Obviously safety hazards aside)
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Old 07-25-2017, 11:12 AM
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The only thing I donít agree with is altering the surroundings to prevent misbehavior. I want my kiddos to adapt to the rules of the house, not the rules of the house to adapt to their whims. To me, removing the problem in a way condones the behavior. I would rather teach self-regulation and consequences for decisions made. (Obviously safety hazards aside)
Common sense however, dictates that we leave nothing within reach that should it get destroyed or broken that it's not the end of the world.

I have many items within reach of the kids that I do NOT want broken or destroyed but something of major value is not something I am willing to "risk".

Curtain rod... meh... unless a safety hazard is no biggie.
Expensive gate that you don't want to replace frequently...don't use WHILE teaching kids boundaries/proper behavior.

AFTER you (general you) KNOW the kids better and are better able to both predict and teach more positive behaviors.... A-okay.
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Old 07-25-2017, 11:27 AM
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Common sense however, dictates that we leave nothing within reach that should it get destroyed or broken that it's not the end of the world.

I have many items within reach of the kids that I do NOT want broken or destroyed but something of major value is not something I am willing to "risk".

Curtain rod... meh... unless a safety hazard is no biggie.
Expensive gate that you don't want to replace frequently...don't use WHILE teaching kids boundaries/proper behavior.

AFTER you (general you) KNOW the kids better and are better able to both predict and teach more positive behaviors.... A-okay.
YES THIS!!!

And, a certain amount of this is just the cost of doing our business.
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Old 07-25-2017, 11:28 AM
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Common sense however, dictates that we leave nothing within reach that should it get destroyed or broken that it's not the end of the world.

I have many items within reach of the kids that I do NOT want broken or destroyed but something of major value is not something I am willing to "risk".

Curtain rod... meh... unless a safety hazard is no biggie.
Expensive gate that you don't want to replace frequently...don't use WHILE teaching kids boundaries/proper behavior.

AFTER you (general you) KNOW the kids better and are better able to both predict and teach more positive behaviors.... A-okay.
Another great point, I do not trust any of them for at least a month!
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Old 07-25-2017, 11:12 PM
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He wasn't using anything to run into the gate he just was walking fast and slammed into it a few times as I was coming back from changing a baby. The strength and force said he had was enough to damage the gate. I didn't even realize it was broken until later because it has feet so to speak so it's propped up from the floor as well as bolted to the wall. Not only is the wall piece broken but also a piece by the where the gate swings is broken.

I don't consider a two-year-old or three-year-old to be a toddler. Where I live a toddler's considered such up until about 18 months maybe 2 years the very most and then older than that is older toddler or preschooler. I've never had a child be so destructive in my home before and it's very evident to me that they don't have any kind of guidance at home and even when I redirect or tell them the rules of the house or put them in time out if they're not following rules they don't stand time out and I have to put them back numerous times which I'm willing to do. And honestly, some of these things have happened with direct supervision. For instance the curtain rod coming down I was less than three feet away from them when it happened but it happened so quick that I wasn't able to do anything about it. I would understand if a baby or a young toddler pull down a curtain rod because for them it's just out of curiosity of what it is but for an old for a two year old to do it is in my opinion just destructive Behavior. I have sense rearranged my room a little bit to have some cubby storage in front of one of the French door and I'll be at arranging my room slightly differently as well to have something in front of the other French door.
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Old 07-25-2017, 11:19 PM
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The gate in its prime: $120
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Old 07-26-2017, 03:13 AM
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I would be looking at a different type of gate. That one doesn't sound sturdy enough for daycare. I know you said he 'should' know better but he doesn't yet, so until he does, you need something that can withstand the trials of daycare. Can you get creative with a closure? Rearrange furniture? Get a better gate?

I would decide right now if you are charging the parents because this should be discussed sooner than later. I fall into the "It happened on my watch" so wouldn't expect parents to pay. However, I would be reconsidering how the situation played out. Ie: how did the child react when you verbally asked him to stop? What did you say/do after it happened? This would give me (you) the information needed as to whether I continued to provide care for the child or not.

I had a child willfully destroy a few things in my home. I decided to term as it was costing me money to keep him.

Best of luck!
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Old 07-26-2017, 08:45 AM
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you should be able to get replacement parts rather than replace the entire gate.
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Old 07-26-2017, 09:35 AM
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I would not charge the parent. I would take it as an expensive lesson learned and put measures in place to prevent it from happening again. As BC said, create a boundary between the kids and the gate/curtains. They cannot touch the gate at all. They cannot enter the area in front of the gate/curtains, ect. It is a simple instruction to follow, so even little ones get it.

As for them being new. I treat new kids like the prison guards treat new prisoners. I don't let my guard down! It takes time to get to know kids and to get a feel for their level of safety/boundaries/awareness/ability. Having eyes on them at all times will help you get to know them and it helps to prevent injuries or accidents. They can start off sweet as pie and turn into crazies by the end of the week, so now that you know these ones are destructive, set some very strict boundaries with them and hopefully things will improve!
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Old 07-26-2017, 02:22 PM
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My policies state that parents may be charged for damage above normal wear and tear, but so far I haven't charged anyone. ITA that it's my job to supervise so that level of damage doesn't occur, and if it does it was probably my fault for not preventing it.

The only time a parent paid damages was when a mom forgot to put her car in Park and it idled forward into our van, causing damage.
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Old 07-26-2017, 03:32 PM
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You teach your kids not to touch the gate? Lol. I would have a hard time with that with even my own kids. I'm strict where I need to be and lenient of other things.

Just because it happened "on my watch", I don't feel that a child should be able to destroy things and have no consequences. I do supervise them intensely but in the 30 seconds I was changing a diaper they ruined 2 things? I mean c'mon.... I don't think it's acceptable for me to take on this cost, especially considering I've told them not to touch the curtains, removed them from the area, and also told them not to hang on, climb, or open the big gate.

That gate has lasted me almost a year and after 5 days of these new kids it's totally destroyed.
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Old 07-26-2017, 04:25 PM
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You teach your kids not to touch the gate? Lol. I would have a hard time with that with even my own kids. I'm strict where I need to be and lenient of other things.

Just because it happened "on my watch", I don't feel that a child should be able to destroy things and have no consequences. I do supervise them intensely but in the 30 seconds I was changing a diaper they ruined 2 things? I mean c'mon.... I don't think it's acceptable for me to take on this cost, especially considering I've told them not to touch the curtains, removed them from the area, and also told them not to hang on, climb, or open the big gate.

That gate has lasted me almost a year and after 5 days of these new kids it's totally destroyed.
Yes, i teach them not to touch the gate. No climbing, opening, hangjng on...that is too many words and directions, versus "no touch". That eliminates those 3 behaviors with two words and creates a boundary between the kid and the gate. It will never get broken, becausd they never get to touch it.

If you feel like you need to charge, then write it up and add it to their bill, but i doubt they will take it well. Either way, if ghe kids stay, they need very firm boundaries and constant supervision until they catch on to your rules.

There is a thread on gates and putting tape on the ground to create the boundary and it is very helpful. Maybe search baby gates and throwing toys to find it.
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Old 07-26-2017, 04:58 PM
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I do try to teach them "no touch" to the gate but they don't listen. The one that wrecked it ran into it, technically didn't "touch" it. -.-

Just frustrated that this happened. If it was an accident, I'd understand
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Old 07-27-2017, 05:11 AM
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Originally Posted by trix23 View Post
I do try to teach them "no touch" to the gate but they don't listen. The one that wrecked it ran into it, technically didn't "touch" it. -.-

Just frustrated that this happened. If it was an accident, I'd understand
You wouldn't like my home, I don't use gates at all & I have long curtains AND NO my toddlers do not pull them down (in TN a little is a toddler 16 thru 30 months); they also have learned where they can walk/crawl and where they can't without having tape on the floor, much less a gate to stop them.
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Old 07-27-2017, 06:19 AM
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The rule here is: Only grown ups touch the gate.

If you feel strongly about charging the parents, just do it. I don't mean this snarky, but you did ask what we would do.
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Old 07-27-2017, 07:40 AM
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You teach your kids not to touch the gate? Lol. I would have a hard time with that with even my own kids. I'm strict where I need to be and lenient of other things.

Just because it happened "on my watch", I don't feel that a child should be able to destroy things and have no consequences. I do supervise them intensely but in the 30 seconds I was changing a diaper they ruined 2 things? I mean c'mon.... I don't think it's acceptable for me to take on this cost, especially considering I've told them not to touch the curtains, removed them from the area, and also told them not to hang on, climb, or open the big gate.

That gate has lasted me almost a year and after 5 days of these new kids it's totally destroyed.
If you are unwilling to view this situation as one of those situations in which you bear the bulk of responsibility then perhaps it's time you either review and edit the areas in which you choose to be lenient.

Money is an area where I am NOT lenient. If a behavior or policy continually costs me money, there are 2 solutions to the issue.
I suck up the costs and write it off on my taxes or change the way/method in which I do things to prevent monetary losses.

You don't get to say "I am lenient in some areas and strict in others" but then complain about the fall out of YOUR choice to be lenient.

Like others have said, I also teach my kiddos to never touch gates or doors. ALL kids from mobile infant to Kindergarten FULLY understand and adhere to that rule.

It's an area I choose to be strict because if I am not it will in one way or another cost me money.

You need to take a hard look at which areas you are needing to be strict and which areas you are able to be lenient.

I do agree there should and can be consequences to their actions but I would be leery of someone that can't or won't see their role in the situation being the one to discipline or implement a consequence.

Bottom line however, is these are children.
They aren't dropped off knowing all the rules and expectations and they certainly don't have the capacity to make mature/safe decisions and follow all the rules all the time.....if they had that ability, they wouldn't require your services.
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Old 07-27-2017, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by trix23 View Post
I do try to teach them "no touch" to the gate but they don't listen. The one that wrecked it ran into it, technically didn't "touch" it. -.-

Just frustrated that this happened. If it was an accident, I'd understand
you can't ruin a gate without touching it in some way. no touch covers the entire body, and anything a child is holding...I'm betting he didn't damage it by hovering over it
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Old 07-27-2017, 09:01 PM
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Originally Posted by trix23 View Post
I do try to teach them "no touch" to the gate but they don't listen. The one that wrecked it ran into it, technically didn't "touch" it. -.-

Just frustrated that this happened. If it was an accident, I'd understand
Don't feel bad, I am in the same boat. I feel like a broken record. "Don't touch the gate, We don't hang on the gates, You are not the gate keeper, I am etc," I can enforce all the no gate rules I want, the littles must be reminded every day, scratch that every hour!
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Old 07-27-2017, 09:10 PM
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Originally Posted by mommyneedsadayoff View Post
Yes, I teach them not to touch the gate. No climbing, opening, hanging on...that is too many words and directions, versus "no touch". That eliminates those 3 behaviors with two words and creates a boundary between the kid and the gate. It will never get broken, because they never get to touch it.
What do you guys do if they do touch it?
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Old 07-27-2017, 10:25 PM
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What do you guys do if they do touch it?
I remove them from the area, redirect...and if they are old enough...sit their butts in the time out chair. it's a safety issue

I have one baby mountain goat that doesn't learn. She spends a lot of time as my shadow.
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Old 07-28-2017, 07:54 AM
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I remove them from the area, redirect...and if they are old enough...sit their butts in the time out chair. it's a safety issue

I have one baby mountain goat that doesn't learn. She spends a lot of time as my shadow.
same here.

Routine, routine, routine etc... and lots of consistency.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mummy101 View Post
What do you guys do if they do touch it?
I start out training them by using another visual barrier that is near the gate. Sort of like a "warning area" or the goalie zone around the net.

This is an excellent place to start:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGa9BURyIw0
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Old 07-28-2017, 08:22 AM
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Agree with BlackCat about everything. I have a destroyer who is 18 months old and she comes with me when I leave the room. I would take them all if I needed to. She cannot have access to the sleep room or the bathroom when she is here. I was doing some sciency things with the kids and had a vinegar volcano set up, she had to watch from a pack and play. She is not to be trusted at all. Toddler is 18 months to 2.5 yrs.

This is all a learning experience. These kids would lose any independance privileges from here on out.
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Old 07-29-2017, 02:49 AM
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I have one baby mountain goat that doesn't learn. She spends a lot of time as my shadow.
Haha! Love this ❤️
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Old 08-01-2017, 07:37 PM
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Update???? Did you charge the parent? How did it go?
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Old 08-01-2017, 11:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
same here.


I start out training them by using another visual barrier that is near the gate. Sort of like a "warning area" or the goalie zone around the net.
]
YEP!! I teach one year olds, and they know you dont go past the red line or your going to the cube (quiet area with books). Our gate looks great now!
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