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  #1  
Old 01-17-2013, 08:27 AM
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melilley melilley is offline
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Default Reggio Emilia Approach

Does anyone use the Reggio Emilia approach for their program? Can you tell me how you implement it in your home based program? I have been researching this educational philosophy and am interested, but I'm not sure if I fully understand it. I know it focuses on child directed curriculum so would that mean a play based curriculum? I learned about this way of teaching in an ECE class, but that was a loooong time ago...lol
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Old 01-17-2013, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by melilley View Post
Does anyone use the Reggio Emilia approach for their program? Can you tell me how you implement it in your home based program? I have been researching this educational philosophy and am interested, but I'm not sure if I fully understand it. I know it focuses on child directed curriculum so would that mean a play based curriculum? I learned about this way of teaching in an ECE class, but that was a loooong time ago...lol
Melskids and Nothing-without-joy.

I am hoping to do my Practicum 3 at a Regio program. I am particularly interested in using it with infants and toddlers, and the transitioning full-blown as they grow
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Old 01-17-2013, 08:46 AM
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I use a mixture of both Reggio and Montessori and really focus on play based curriculum and unplanned teachable moments/moments of value.

Here is a really cool site about a Reggio child care and how it works for them!


http://www.reggiokids.com/about/about_approach.php
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Old 01-17-2013, 09:03 AM
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I use a mixture of both Reggio and Montessori and really focus on play based curriculum and unplanned teachable moments/moments of value.

Here is a really cool site about a Reggio child care and how it works for them!


http://www.reggiokids.com/about/about_approach.php
Thanks for the link!
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Old 01-17-2013, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
I use a mixture of both Reggio and Montessori and really focus on play based curriculum and unplanned teachable moments/moments of value.

Here is a really cool site about a Reggio child care and how it works for them!


http://www.reggiokids.com/about/about_approach.php
I do a combination focused on play based learning as well.

There's a lot of good blogs too!
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Old 01-17-2013, 09:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
I use a mixture of both Reggio and Montessori and really focus on play based curriculum and unplanned teachable moments/moments of value.

Here is a really cool site about a Reggio child care and how it works for them!


http://www.reggiokids.com/about/about_approach.php
Soo...that brings me back to the magical documentation. It's a big aspect of Reggio, and a big plus-point for Youngstar. It's the main reason I'm considering the Gold Assessment.

How do you approach this, BC?
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Old 01-17-2013, 09:29 AM
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Since all "play" contains learning moments, I just choose one developmental area at a time to observe and document.

Lets use blocks for example. Blocks can be appropriate for
math/science (counting, sorting and grouping)
language/literacy (color identification, shape identification, bin lables and conversation and communication)
social/emotional (sharing and group play)
physical/motor skills(stacking, sorting)
cognitive (bigger, smaller, wider, round, smooth etc)

Is that the documentation part you are referring to?

The rating thing here is still only a pilot program and we haven't been "schooled" or trained on any of that as of yet. I am simply remembering documentation from my college course work.
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Old 01-17-2013, 12:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
Since all "play" contains learning moments, I just choose one developmental area at a time to observe and document.

Lets use blocks for example. Blocks can be appropriate for
math/science (counting, sorting and grouping)
language/literacy (color identification, shape identification, bin lables and conversation and communication)
social/emotional (sharing and group play)
physical/motor skills(stacking, sorting)
cognitive (bigger, smaller, wider, round, smooth etc)

Is that the documentation part you are referring to?

The rating thing here is still only a pilot program and we haven't been "schooled" or trained on any of that as of yet. I am simply remembering documentation from my college course work.
yeah...sort of...

For Youngstar. the expectation here is:

You assess the children through an accepted assessment tool. Then, you decide what Early Learning Standards you want to address. Based on this, you write your curriculum (for all the children, including infants). Then, you document what they've done, communicate what they've learned, and you assess again. It's all about being "intentional".

So...through your observations and assessments, you notice one 4yo hasn't mastered scissors. You intigrate use of scissors into your lesson plans. You take a picture of the child using scissors, ad an annotation into their portfolio, and make sure to communicate that with the parents.

You would do the same for your infants-school agers. For school-agers, there is a whole OTHER set of criteria to integrate.
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Old 04-05-2013, 01:34 PM
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I am hoping to do my Practicum 3 at a Regio program. I am particularly interested in using it with infants and toddlers, and the transitioning full-blown as they grow
That's what I'm interested in too - will you share what you learn? (Pretty please?
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Old 04-05-2013, 04:08 PM
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So glad you asked this! I've been spending all day researching Reggio Emilia & Waldorf styles. I love the looks ( & drooled over Nothingwithoutjoy's rooms), though I prefer bright colours. I like the emphasis on natural materials, as we primarily use wooden toys here, though we do have a few plastic ones, including our outdoor jungle gym. The wooden, natural stuff goes along with my crunchy sensibilities. OK, now I'm going to actually go read the thread. I was just excited that someone else was on my wavelength today.
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Old 04-05-2013, 05:53 PM
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I'd love to know what you think of Waldorf. I haven't researched it at all, so all I know about it is that gnomes are really popular.
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Old 04-05-2013, 07:21 PM
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I'd love to know what you think of Waldorf. I haven't researched it at all, so all I know about it is that gnomes are really popular.
And fairies.
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Old 01-17-2013, 05:16 PM
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Originally Posted by melilley View Post
Does anyone use the Reggio Emilia approach for their program? Can you tell me how you implement it in your home based program? I have been researching this educational philosophy and am interested, but I'm not sure if I fully understand it. I know it focuses on child directed curriculum so would that mean a play based curriculum? I learned about this way of teaching in an ECE class, but that was a loooong time ago...lol
My program is Reggio-inspired. It's a huge shift in perspective from traditional American schooling, so it's impossible to sum up in a post. A few things that come to mind right away--
--yes, play based and child directed (some say "a negotiated curriculum," as in it's drawn from the children's play/interests/questions but is co-created between the children and the adults)
--based on an assumption of children's competence (vs. their "needs," as we often see things here)
--based on relationships
--high value on the environment, aesthetics
--offering opportunities for children to express what they know through "the hundred languages of children" (i.e. drawing, paint, dance, drama, construction, song, etc, etc, etc)--not crafts, not randomly selected art activities, but art as a medium of communication and problem-solving
--using documentation to record what's going on, analyze it, share it with the community, and reflect back on it with the children--so to build on it and take the project further.

At home, the trickiest part about implementing Reggio practices (for me) is that there's no co-teacher to brainstorm with. And when I'm deep into project work with children and someone suddenly needs to be wiped or a fight needs to be refereed, there's no one but me to do it--so there's a lot more interruptions. Also, at home I don't want the large documentation panels that were a big part of my work in the classroom, so I work to find other ways to document.

I spend my naptimes writing blog posts for the parents, which serve as my main documentation. I'd love to be able to share them with you all, but it's a private blog. I have a few Reggio-based posts on my personal blog, which you may see here, if you're interested. Some other Reggio-inspired aspects you might notice if you visited my home:
--other documentation of our work, such as a book about a recent project
--a fully-stocked art studio in lieu of a playroom
--the use of real materials--from drinking glasses to art supplies--rather than kids' stuff
--child-initiated projects from tiny (a collage) to large (an "museum" evening event for parents planned by the kids, with costumes made by the kids, art displayed by the kids, invitations written by the kids, etc.)
--use of natural materials, light, mirrors.

You can get a tiny glimpse into our day through my recent craigslist ad, here. I also have some environment pics up in the decor forum.

Well, this is turning into a ridiculously long post! I'll leave it there and you can ask me questions if you want more.
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Old 01-17-2013, 07:51 PM
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Originally Posted by nothingwithoutjoy View Post
My program is Reggio-inspired. It's a huge shift in perspective from traditional American schooling, so it's impossible to sum up in a post. A few things that come to mind right away--
--yes, play based and child directed (some say "a negotiated curriculum," as in it's drawn from the children's play/interests/questions but is co-created between the children and the adults)
--based on an assumption of children's competence (vs. their "needs," as we often see things here)
--based on relationships
--high value on the environment, aesthetics
--offering opportunities for children to express what they know through "the hundred languages of children" (i.e. drawing, paint, dance, drama, construction, song, etc, etc, etc)--not crafts, not randomly selected art activities, but art as a medium of communication and problem-solving
--using documentation to record what's going on, analyze it, share it with the community, and reflect back on it with the children--so to build on it and take the project further.

At home, the trickiest part about implementing Reggio practices (for me) is that there's no co-teacher to brainstorm with. And when I'm deep into project work with children and someone suddenly needs to be wiped or a fight needs to be refereed, there's no one but me to do it--so there's a lot more interruptions. Also, at home I don't want the large documentation panels that were a big part of my work in the classroom, so I work to find other ways to document.

I spend my naptimes writing blog posts for the parents, which serve as my main documentation. I'd love to be able to share them with you all, but it's a private blog. I have a few Reggio-based posts on my personal blog, which you may see here, if you're interested. Some other Reggio-inspired aspects you might notice if you visited my home:
--other documentation of our work, such as a book about a recent project
--a fully-stocked art studio in lieu of a playroom
--the use of real materials--from drinking glasses to art supplies--rather than kids' stuff
--child-initiated projects from tiny (a collage) to large (an "museum" evening event for parents planned by the kids, with costumes made by the kids, art displayed by the kids, invitations written by the kids, etc.)
--use of natural materials, light, mirrors.

You can get a tiny glimpse into our day through my recent craigslist ad, here. I also have some environment pics up in the decor forum.

Well, this is turning into a ridiculously long post! I'll leave it there and you can ask me questions if you want more.
Wow! Thank you for all your info...you are truly inspiring me...I have a lot of research to do! Your field bags are amazing! I love how you talk about adding items as time goes on and how the children will learn form what is added as they get older. Thank you for all the information1
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Old 01-18-2013, 09:17 AM
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Oh, good! Glad it was useful. :-)
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Old 01-18-2013, 11:20 AM
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Maybe Crystal (??) will chime in. I remember awhile ago she was a fan.
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Old 01-19-2013, 08:42 AM
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Hi, Heidi,

I just found your post, misfiled under another post--glad I spotted it! I'll cut and paste it here, since I don't know how to fix that:

"Nothing Without Joy:

Oh...I have SOOO many questions. I was going to PM you, but since there is interest, I'll ask here.

My first question, is I noticed that you had several rooms that you use. Are the children free to roam around, or do you keep them together as a group?

I see that your daughter is a 1-year old. Is she an exception to your program, or do you typically have such little ones? How do you keep her safe in your program with glue guns and tiny pieces available?

How do you keep your studio and home beautiful? I am trying to figure out just how I could offer paint, clay, and tiny pieces of things here and not have it everywhere. I would love to do it...

Do you have any "toys"? Maybe I missed it. You said no "playroom", but do you have a selection of blocks, dressup toys, etc?

Where can one get Reggio training? There is a center in Madison that uses the approach, and I think they are offering a training in April. I'm just trying to figure out how to apply a center approach, with everyone the same age in a classroom, to a mixed age group.... "

Then I'm going to reply separately, so I can quote it properly.
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