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  #1  
Old 09-21-2015, 05:01 PM
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Default Is This A New Trend?

There have been a lot of tours in my center for my class (infants) and over half of the parents ask if I'm teaching the DCKs the alphabet, numbers, shapes,colors, etc. A few even told me that they do flash cards with their toddler so they can "learn" them at home. All of them want full on K-5 curriculum just on a toddler level. Many complained that their current/previous provider doesn't do art everyday.

Isn't this a bit much to expect in a toddler room? Why do parents even want all of this? I've been doing daycare for 20 years and I've never experienced this before. After the fourth tour, I started keeping a tally of the children's age and it averaged 16mos.
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Old 09-21-2015, 06:40 PM
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Sadly yes. To most "quality" education means their 2 year old classroom will be called preschool, they will do worksheets galore and bring home a ton of Pinteresty crafts that they know dang well their child didn't do on their own. They want to brag to their friends about their child's preschool, show off the teachers crafts claimed to be their child's and want their child to perform parlor tricks for friends by singing their A,B,C's.
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Old 09-21-2015, 09:16 PM
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Originally Posted by nanglgrl View Post
Sadly yes. To most "quality" education means their 2 year old classroom will be called preschool, they will do worksheets galore and bring home a ton of Pinteresty crafts that they know dang well their child didn't do on their own. They want to brag to their friends about their child's preschool, show off the teachers crafts claimed to be their child's and want their child to perform parlor tricks for friends by singing their A,B,C's.
I'm thinking this too. From what I've seen on This forum, flash cards and other similar items don't even work for children this age.
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Old 09-22-2015, 03:04 AM
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Even if this type of stuff worked(which I 100% agree it doesn't!!) do parents not accept any of that responsibility anymore?? Isn't it true that a parent is a child's first and most important teacher? Are people so insecure they have to have their own child's success speak for their own value? I just don't get it??
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Old 09-22-2015, 04:34 AM
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Is so weirdweird! My husband was traveling for work and the guy next to him on the plane was bragging to him that his 4 year old was doing algebra and could read whole books. He asked my husband if our kids had any special talents and my husband said "nope, they're just NORMAL kids." My husband said the guy looked at him with a sympathetic look. No one is happy with normal anymore! I see it in my circle of friends. We all have 1-5 year olds. They are always carting their kids to all these special classes and sport practices and the kids have ZERO downtime. It's all so the parents can tell us, "Tommy can read chapter books in kindergarten!" It's ALL for the parents. I refuse to play into that game.
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Old 09-22-2015, 05:28 AM
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There is a ton of research that has come out on this recently. One of my favorite Facebook pages, called let the children play, just posted this
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog...long-term-harm

I have been known to share it with parents who push me to use early academics.
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Old 09-22-2015, 05:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Indoorvoice View Post
Is so weirdweird! My husband was traveling for work and the guy next to him on the plane was bragging to him that his 4 year old was doing algebra and could read whole books. He asked my husband if our kids had any special talents and my husband said "nope, they're just NORMAL kids." My husband said the guy looked at him with a sympathetic look. No one is happy with normal anymore! I see it in my circle of friends. We all have 1-5 year olds. They are always carting their kids to all these special classes and sport practices and the kids have ZERO downtime. It's all so the parents can tell us, "Tommy can read chapter books in kindergarten!" It's ALL for the parents. I refuse to play into that game.
I had a co-worker in the corporate world whose son was the same age as mine. She was always bragging about how he was potty-trained so early, learning to write his name at 2, etc, etc. It made me feel horrible at the time, even though I didn't even believe that her son was doing half the stuff she was bragging about. Its like peer pressure for adults. I'm happy to report though that my son at 5 has an insatiable love of learning.
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  #8  
Old 09-22-2015, 05:39 AM
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My 2 year-old son's class has been working on letters and numbers and colors and shapes, but really I think a lot of that is just a byproduct of the amount of reading they do. But they also do a lot of singing and dancing and playing. I've noticed that they do a lot of "art," but a good bit of it is really just the kids scribbling. When he was still in the infant classroom, it was a lot of those cutesy hand-print, foot-print Pintrest projects, because what else are you going to do with non-mobile infants and still get the art requirement done.
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Old 09-22-2015, 06:41 AM
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I've seen the results of this a lot And it's not pretty. I have had many kids who can recognize letters early etc. but have no idea what the letter means if that makes sense. Its like if I decided to be a doctor but never went to school and instead was just an intern for a few years. I could probably learn the lingo and convince people to trust me, I could probably even treat patients successfully but there would be huge gaps in my knowledge and eventually they would become apparent. These children are being pushed too hard, too soon and major things are being skipped, children are also more stressed.
Children naturally progress in the early years and it's really apparent when you compare their work. I have a 1 1/2 year old, 2 1/2 year old, 3 1/2 year old, 4 1/2 year old and 5 1/2 year old in my daycare. They drew self portraits last week. The 1 1/2 year old scribbled, the 2 1/2 year old scribbled but was able to draw a circle, the 3 1/2 year old drew a person but forgot hands, feet, body and the face was a jumble of lines, the 4 1/2 year old drew a head, body, legs and arms but no feet or hands and the face wasn't perfectly recognizable, the 5 1/2 year old drew an entire person with hair and colored it in. I don't have a 6 1/2 year old but pictures my daughter drew at that age show that she added clothing and at 7 1/2 she now adds a lot of detail. To get this progression they just have to have the opportunity to color, the opportunity to develop fine motor skills and the opportunity to observe and play. When you skip coloring for teaching A,B,C's you do children a huge disservice.
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  #10  
Old 09-22-2015, 07:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spedmommy4 View Post
There is a ton of research that has come out on this recently. One of my favorite Facebook pages, called let the children play, just posted this
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog...long-term-harm

I have been known to share it with parents who push me to use early academics.
Great article!

It's also a known fact that there is NO evidence that early childhood education has any long term benefits beyond 3rd grade. Other than for kids who were already behind.
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Old 09-22-2015, 07:03 AM
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Yes it's becoming important to offer these things, but an early education curriculum done correctly is nothing to sneeze at. It should include a lot ofbplay, emotional intelligence, music and movement, learning how to use art materials, and lots and lots of being read to and hands-on experience with books.
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  #12  
Old 09-22-2015, 07:16 AM
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Great article!

It's also a known fact that there is NO evidence that early childhood education has any long term benefits beyond 3rd grade. Other than for kids who were already behind.
This is a fact - school teachers call third grade "the great equalizer". If a child is a superstar in school before third grade, they will most likely equal out in third grade. Those that are "behind" tend to catch up.
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  #13  
Old 09-22-2015, 07:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Indoorvoice View Post
Is so weirdweird! My husband was traveling for work and the guy next to him on the plane was bragging to him that his 4 year old was doing algebra and could read whole books. He asked my husband if our kids had any special talents and my husband said "nope, they're just NORMAL kids." My husband said the guy looked at him with a sympathetic look. No one is happy with normal anymore! I see it in my circle of friends. We all have 1-5 year olds. They are always carting their kids to all these special classes and sport practices and the kids have ZERO downtime. It's all so the parents can tell us, "Tommy can read chapter books in kindergarten!" It's ALL for the parents. I refuse to play into that game.
Last year I had a boy in my care who was older 3 (turned 4 in February) Mom told me he could read, knew all his numbers, etc which he did...BUUUT, he didn't make eye contact, engage in cooperative peer play, have age appropriate self help skills (he was asked to slip on shoes and would spin in circles on the floor crying) He was more work than an of the other kids his age in my care.
So um yeah, that's great he can read...
In fact most of the kids I've had in care who were "academically advanced" had significant issues in other areas. Rarely have I witnessed the total "genius" package
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Old 09-22-2015, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by spedmommy4 View Post
There is a ton of research that has come out on this recently. One of my favorite Facebook pages, called let the children play, just posted this
https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog...long-term-harm

I have been known to share it with parents who push me to use early academics.
I literally just read this article yesterday and plan to keep this as my focus. If parents want more, they can go somewhere else.
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  #15  
Old 09-22-2015, 07:49 AM
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I definitely do a certain amount of "presentation" teaching for the parents.

What I do for the kids:
Purposeful free play options and invitations to play.
Rotating Sensory tubs
Daily story time and singing songs
Art available always
Healthy meals
Lots of reading time (being available when they are interested)

What I do for the parents:
Document my awesomeness with pictures of the great play their kids engage in
weekly "pinterest" like crafts for their fridge
10-15 min a day of "preschool" with 3-5 year olds with tracing practice, letter project, counting/sorting etc. type project to send home (or pics of it to them)


I don't do anything that I believe has ZERO value, but my program is a product I have to sell so I do a little that I think is a little less beneficial than the rest, but allows me to charge more
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Old 09-22-2015, 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Play Care View Post
Last year I had a boy in my care who was older 3 (turned 4 in February) Mom told me he could read, knew all his numbers, etc which he did...BUUUT, he didn't make eye contact, engage in cooperative peer play, have age appropriate self help skills (he was asked to slip on shoes and would spin in circles on the floor crying) He was more work than an of the other kids his age in my care.
So um yeah, that's great he can read...
In fact most of the kids I've had in care who were "academically advanced" had significant issues in other areas. Rarely have I witnessed the total "genius" package


This has been my experience, as well.

I don't get a lot of parents like that here, personally. But I have noticed that more and more in home daycares (locally) are offering preschool-type programming, heavy on academics. Their pictures show their spaces looking like small school rooms. Not where I would send my child but I'm used to being different.
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Old 09-22-2015, 07:59 AM
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I think that it starting to become more of what parents are being sold.

here in california we have a program called first 5. I believe that they are the largest agency that provide resources to children from zero to 5. Most of the catering from this agency is for low income children.

Well this agency advertises EVERY WHERE. in these ads, they say a child learns the most from zero to age 3, so get your child learning, teach your child, do this, do that and etc.

I participate with this agency and i don't practice a lot of what they have set for their curriculum, but I would honestly say that it is an amazing organization over all.

I honestly can tell you that when i have a child come in at 18 months and stay with me for a least two years, I have those children reading. the earlier they get subjected to a learning environment, the earlier they pick it up. They are building good habits.

the older the child is when they come in 3 and up, I have a much harder time getting them to break old habits and grasp the idea of learning.

I don't agree with doing ditto sheets or anything of that nature. learning is fun and if it's not fun for the kids, then they are will not learning.
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Old 09-22-2015, 08:43 AM
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It's different for different groups of people. My son is in a kind of hippie charter school in second grade. Most of the families from that group place higher value on having their child in nature, on the farm, camping and hiking. There are a couple of outdoor only preschool programs here. Parent pay big bucks to drop their kids off at parks with the teachers. No facility at all. So you can imagine how many flash cards they have. On the other end of the spectrum, in the same town, we have parents coming in to tour at the center (I no longer work there) where they asked about kindergarten prep, etc (and you better believe those parents had plenty of ideas, plans and resources lined up to provide teachers!).

This is why I never understand why providers get worked up about a 'curriculum'. A curriculum really just means you wrote down a plan. The plan can say the area of development intended (ex: large motor), what materials you'll use (ex: obstacle course), what goals you have for the children and perhaps a little info about what happened. So if parents say they want to know what the toddler curriculum is, you tell them. It's developing social, large motor etc by experiencing daily care and exploring materials, etc...

I know in this case you are saying they actually asked about flashcards. But I do see providers getting concerned about the word 'curriculum'. I think it's just a more organized and easier way to communicate what it is providers are doing with the children. Because you know the child is learning important skills, but the parents don't know. They dont see commercials for social skills and creativity and the progression of fine motor and the advantage kids have for the rest of their school careers from knowing how to communicate better with peers. They see commercials for ABC Mouse. They think oh, ABC Mouse does all this for 99 / month, I'm paying the care place $500/ week, the care place should be doing at least this much.

So in the situation when a parent (who truly doesn't know what's necessary for their child's optimal development) asks do you teach the infants and toddlers numbers and letters, I would tell them about the sort of activities they do, what they learn from them and that lessons on letters and numbers are not developmentally appropriate or useful and are in fact detrimental to an infant and toddler curriculum... I think parents don't really think people who work with children know what they are talking about. In their eyes, we are doing the babysitting job that they did when they were 12 years old and they know what level their understanding of child development was at that time. So, they think that's us. The only way to show them we know what we are talking about (and that what we are doing is correct and best for the kids) is to give them clear, factual information from reputable sources. Show them articles from the NAEYC about how children develop. Show them reports and studies from the psych community about the importance of play. Then ask them who is saying ABC Mouse is good for kids? The people who get paid for ABC Mouse- that's all. No one else. Why haven't any doctors, psychologists, or child development professionals said ABCs and 123s are important, good or healthy or best for young children? Because it isn't true. Why would any of those groups deny the benefits of flash cards if any benefit existed? It's not like its something we couldn't easily do, if it was proven to be a positive for kids. Anyone can put letters on a piece of paper and hold it up. But who here knows how to teach 2 two year olds how to resolve a conflict without a forced apology and a time out- I'm talking conflict resolution and teaching those toddlers how to work things out together. Some know how to, some don't. What about how to place the right materials in the right way to interest and intrigue toddlers to handle and experiment with the materials and learn its properties and how to predict the way materials will react or behave under different circumstances? How about how to take one step at a time, holding the rail on the patio because if they learn that first instead of just holding an adult's hand or having no stairs at all, they will develop a better spacial awareness and muscle control and will be forever physically changed by that development. Those are the things parents should be hoping to see in an infant toddler curriculum.
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Old 09-22-2015, 08:52 AM
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I have two 21m boys and a 15m boy. We do art a couple of times a week, but it is basically just giving them finger paints and letting them create their own masterpiece. One of the 21m boys loves it and picks and chooses colors and thinks about every stroke. The other 21m has no interest whatsoever and the little one makes a horrible mess, but has fun.

We read lots of books, sing songs, felt board stories, finger puppets, etc. We talk about what we are doing all day. The older boys know red, green and purple, the baby thinks everything is purple.

They all will count 1, 2, 3, but they don't associate that with counting items yet. They learned that one because I would let them jump off a diaper box into a pile of pillows when we were stuck in the house one day and they were crazy.

We have an ABC book, and we sing while I point to each letter. They will all try to say ABC, but they don't associate it with a particular letter yet.

I don't use a curriculum, I tell the parents that we are purposefully playing. They are exposed to the concept, even though they aren't quite ready to learn it yet. I think early exposure without pressure is great. Maybe the parents interviewing just want to make sure that their baby has exposure?
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Old 09-22-2015, 10:38 AM
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Recently lost two dck two families because at 2yr well check Ped told dcp child needed certain amount of words. Both dcp freaked and put dck in 2yr preschool (primrose & Goddard).
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Old 09-22-2015, 10:55 AM
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Originally Posted by littletots View Post
Recently lost two dck two families because at 2yr well check Ped told dcp child needed certain amount of words. Both dcp freaked and put dck in 2yr preschool (primrose & Goddard).
The thing is, they learn most from their parents talking to them not Primrose and Goddard!

I have a website where I state that I am play based and I site a bunch of Educational resources that I have known about since I graduated college 10 years ago. I also flat out say that I do not do themes or circle time. My main focus is on emergent curriculum which means we learn what the kids are interested in. We never sit and I never teach. It goes against everything I stand for as an ECE. One thing that people comment to me on about my own kids is how imaginative they are. I think it's because I let them be kids. Most kids I see nowadays look depressed and have no imaginative skills. That's what I end up working on in my daycare!!
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Old 09-22-2015, 10:58 AM
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Great article!

It's also a known fact that there is NO evidence that early childhood education has any long term benefits beyond 3rd grade. Other than for kids who were already behind.
Yes and if I remember correctly the only thing that made a difference in the first place was HIGH QUALITY early education which roughly translated meant educated professional and low turnover rates.
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Old 09-22-2015, 11:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Controlled Chaos View Post
I definitely do a certain amount of "presentation" teaching for the parents.

What I do for the kids:
Purposeful free play options and invitations to play.
Rotating Sensory tubs
Daily story time and singing songs
Art available always
Healthy meals
Lots of reading time (being available when they are interested)

What I do for the parents:
Document my awesomeness with pictures of the great play their kids engage in
weekly "pinterest" like crafts for their fridge
10-15 min a day of "preschool" with 3-5 year olds with tracing practice, letter project, counting/sorting etc. type project to send home (or pics of it to them)


I don't do anything that I believe has ZERO value, but my program is a product I have to sell so I do a little that I think is a little less beneficial than the rest, but allows me to charge more
This is my program as well, and to be honest I don't think it's over the top or inappropriate for the ages of kids in my care.

I do balk at the idea of having to use a formal curriculum (i.e. mother goose, fun shine, etc) or have kids sitting for long periods for formal learning activity.
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Old 09-22-2015, 11:48 AM
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This is my program as well, and to be honest I don't think it's over the top or inappropriate for the ages of kids in my care.

I do balk at the idea of having to use a formal curriculum (i.e. mother goose, fun shine, etc) or have kids sitting for long periods for formal learning activity.
I do the same except we rarely do Pinterest type crafts and we also have a weekly theme that activities and books are based around. The theme is more for me since it helps me organize activities, use all of the resources I've aquifer and makes sure I'm not reading the same books over and over. Circle time is mostly for the 4 and 5 yo.
The only times we do a craft that a parent would want to hang in the fridge is Christmas, Mother's Day and Father's Day and I still try to choose crafts that the child can do themselves for the most part.
I still get parents of the under 3 group asking what their child is learning. I've explained how children that young learn, I've posted articles and it appeases them for a while. I explain that when the 4 and 5 yo work on handwriting the younger children work on their fine motor skills and their ability to hold a writing tool correctly so they are working on their handwriting even if the scribbles on their paper aren't letters. My daycare kids that stay with me end up going to kinder ahead of the game but I can usually tell by the time the child is 2yo if the parent will end up pulling them to send them to formal preschool at 3 or 4.
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Old 09-22-2015, 12:28 PM
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What gets me is when I see the effects on even the young school agers. I have Kindergarteners and transitional Kindergarteners in my program, and the ones who are really struggling in school have really poor social emotional skills. I have two that came from play based preschools and two from academic.

One from the academic preschool was sent home last week for biting and has spent this week in the behavioral resource room. Here with me, he needs just as much social support as a young 3 year old but there is no way he is getting that in Kindergarten. I personally believe that the huge benefit to early childhood "education" is the social skills that young children learn. Convincing parents of that is tough . . . At least until their Kindergartener gets sent home for biting.
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Old 09-22-2015, 12:38 PM
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This is my program as well, and to be honest I don't think it's over the top or inappropriate for the ages of kids in my care.

I do balk at the idea of having to use a formal curriculum (i.e. mother goose, fun shine, etc) or have kids sitting for long periods for formal learning activity.
Yes, I don't pay for a curriculum. I do have monthly themes to help me plan corresponding sensory bins, art/crafts projects, letters to trace (lots of Ds this month since we are doing dinosaurs) and appropriate toys to cycle in and out. The kids and parents love the themes, I decorate the room and it makes the first week of every month feel like Christmas. It also helps me feel like I am "doing" something. I need to control something (planning activities and what not) in order to relax into letting the children play. I am super type A
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Old 09-22-2015, 12:43 PM
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I do the same except we rarely do Pinterest type crafts and we also have a weekly theme that activities and books are based around. The theme is more for me since it helps me organize activities, use all of the resources I've aquifer and makes sure I'm not reading the same books over and over. Circle time is mostly for the 4 and 5 yo.
The only times we do a craft that a parent would want to hang in the fridge is Christmas, Mother's Day and Father's Day and I still try to choose crafts that the child can do themselves for the most part.
I still get parents of the under 3 group asking what their child is learning. I've explained how children that young learn, I've posted articles and it appeases them for a while. I explain that when the 4 and 5 yo work on handwriting the younger children work on their fine motor skills and their ability to hold a writing tool correctly so they are working on their handwriting even if the scribbles on their paper aren't letters. My daycare kids that stay with me end up going to kinder ahead of the game but I can usually tell by the time the child is 2yo if the parent will end up pulling them to send them to formal preschool at 3 or 4.
Yep, this. Honestly part of the parent pleasing art we do once a week or so is to appease this crowd as I hate turnover. I don't like training new kids So one hand print brontosaurs I help the kiddos glue a googly eye to makes the over achieving parents happy. AND I do believe there is something to doing an activity for the practice of learning to follow directions every once in a while. Then I give them extra paint and goodly eyes and let them go wild
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Old 09-22-2015, 01:25 PM
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I like to think of myself somewhere in the middle of academic and play based.

I have monthly learning goals that contain:

1-2 letters
1-2 numbers
1-2 colors
1-2 shapes
1 science concept
1 opposite pair
1 positive social goal
1 theme each week (depending on the theme and interest we will do two weeks)

I stress to parents that these are just goals and I just introduce the material to the kids. It is not stressful and if a child walks away from one month not being able to recognize a triangle - it is okay. Same with the themes. I have found (especially now that so many kids get so much screen time) that children are not introduced to as many different things and events as they used to be. The themes help me to be organized and they help introduce the children to things they may have not otherwise been introduced to. To help with this, I get about 8 books for each theme and we read them daily.

Everything is done is a very hands on play based way. This week we are exploring fall. So far we have sung a song about falling leaves, counted and sorted leaves, explored leaves with a magnifying glass, gone on a "color of the month" scavenger hunt though the house, thrown leaves up in the air and down on the ground (opposite pair this month is up/down) played a game of sink or float using leaves, pine cones and acorns and made a hand print fall tree and a fall scene.

For art, I never make an example piece and I tell parents art is about the process not the outcome. Our fall trees yesterday were a perfect example. I had one child who took his time carefully making his fingerprint leaves and one other child who dove into the paint and finger painted the entire sheet covering her tree - they both had fun and they both were proud of their work.
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Old 09-22-2015, 03:05 PM
happymom happymom is offline
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This is so funny because when I was inquiring about what my infants schedule would be like I recieved an answer based on academics rather than what I was looking for (naps/feeding/changing/etc).

Ummmm........

It is nice for my 3 year old to be exposed to so much learning at his daycare. I noticed a huge change in him when I moved him from his in-home daycare to his center based daycare.

My son's in home daycare was very art and academics oriented. He was writing letters and numbers and learning sight words and phonics at his in home. They spent a lot of time coloring and doing art projects but also watching videos. He was always so so proud of the paintings and coloring pages he brought home.

In his center based daycare they have a curriculum posted, they do much more singing/song based things, they are MUCH LESS focused on writing/phonics and art and much more focused on themes. The art he does in his center based daycare is very limited (paintings with just one color, seems to be very rushed, he is rarely proud of the things he brings home, sometimes he tells me that he didn't make that, Miss L made it). Most of his academic progress (writing mostly) from his in home daycare just over two months ago has already been lost.


These are just my observations as a mom. Not stating that one is better than the other, I just try to make time for more of the art and writing stuff that he was so proud of and loved from his home based daycare at home so he still has the oportunity to paint with a full pallet of colors and write his name with something other than a crayon
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  #30  
Old 09-22-2015, 08:19 PM
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Bookworm Bookworm is offline
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I apologize about getting back to you ladies but we had a plumbing emergency today. Thanks for your responses. I don't have a true curriculum but I do a monthly theme. We read and sing songs, and art based on that theme. I've had to explain that I don't drill my kids with flash cards. I prefer them to explore inside and outside and I take it from there.

I do believe that there is too much competition between parents about who has the smartest kids and whose daycare is the most advanced. I was the fours teacher for a long time so this is shocking to me. Spedmommy4, I will definitely read this article. BC, where can I find articles about your post?
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  #31  
Old 09-23-2015, 08:20 AM
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Snowmom Snowmom is offline
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I do preschool activities with my group (but I also homeschool), which consists of the usual ABC's, 123's. But I agree, it has gotten a little out of control in regards to parent expectations.
What I think is funny about this, is how licensing/government is now pushing it, at least in my state.
I'm on the grant committee for Think Small in my state and our priorities for this year's grants have changed so much from the past priorities. The big push now is getting all providers to use Assessment Tools.

The breakdown of allotted money for FCC is a bit skewed too:
2015/2016 Family Child Care - $1100 Maximum total for all grant types

$300 Physical Health and Well-being
$200 Teaching and Relationships
$100 Assessing of Child Progress
$500 Professional Development

So, they want us to put more emphasis on getting degrees & Assessments, rather than larger purchases in safety & the equipment that gets used daily (Physical Health & Well- Being). In the past, "Professional Development" has maxed out at no more than $300 for my county and usually geared towards the basic continuing education requirements. "Assessing of Child Progress" is new this year and licensing has been emailing nearly every provider pushing Assessments like POCET, The Ounce Scale and Brigance.
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Old 09-23-2015, 09:49 AM
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Blackcat31 Blackcat31 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowmom View Post
I do preschool activities with my group (but I also homeschool), which consists of the usual ABC's, 123's. But I agree, it has gotten a little out of control in regards to parent expectations.
What I think is funny about this, is how licensing/government is now pushing it, at least in my state.
I'm on the grant committee for Think Small in my state and our priorities for this year's grants have changed so much from the past priorities. The big push now is getting all providers to use Assessment Tools.

The breakdown of allotted money for FCC is a bit skewed too:
2015/2016 Family Child Care - $1100 Maximum total for all grant types

$300 Physical Health and Well-being
$200 Teaching and Relationships
$100 Assessing of Child Progress
$500 Professional Development

So, they want us to put more emphasis on getting degrees & Assessments, rather than larger purchases in safety & the equipment that gets used daily (Physical Health & Well- Being). In the past, "Professional Development" has maxed out at no more than $300 for my county and usually geared towards the basic continuing education requirements. "Assessing of Child Progress" is new this year and licensing has been emailing nearly every provider pushing Assessments like POCET, The Ounce Scale and Brigance.
I am in your state and also part of Parent Aware. I participate in Think Small and the Early Learning- Race to the Top scholarship programs.

They focus on providers using assessment tools because they want more early intervention. I agree with that idea/concept but I think they are doing it for the wrong reasons.

I am on the grant review committee for those that apply for the statewide child care regional grants and the entire way we are to rate the grant requests has also changed. The focus of course is more on those things that align with PA than anything safety or health related.

They are also giving priority to those providers that are 1 and 2 stars over the ones that have already completed and done the rating process at the 3 and 4 star levels.
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