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Unregistered 10:17 AM 10-10-2013
Great article:
Top 10 Ways to Stop Caregivers from Overfeeding Your Breastfed Baby

http://sdbfc.com/blog/
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Cat Herder 10:34 AM 10-10-2013
Interesting article. The problem is several of these things are illegal (for us operating legally) to do.

1. We cannot reheat or reuse breastmilk.

2. We have a required minimum amount we are to feed infants per "meal".

Check out the National Food Program Guidelines for an eye opener. Maybe if parents started with educating our lawmakers instead of having "heart to hearts" and asking providers to break laws we would all benefit??

I support your over-all goal, I just think you are starting too low on the totem pole.

***My state still wants breastmilk stored in a seperate fridge away from food or formula bottles... you know it is a biohazard (body fluid). We are making progress, just very slowly.
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butterfly 10:45 AM 10-10-2013
Originally Posted by Cat Herder:
Interesting article. The problem is several of these things are illegal (for us operating legally) to do.

1. We cannot reheat or reuse breastmilk.

2. We have a required minimum amount we are to feed infants per "meal".

Check out the National Food Program Guidelines for an eye opener. Maybe if parents started with educating our lawmakers instead of having "heart to hearts" and asking providers to break laws we would all benefit??

I support your over-all goal, I just think you are starting too low on the totem pole.

***My state still wants breastmilk stored in a seperate fridge away from food... you know it is a biohazard (body fluid). We are making progress, just very slowly.

and to the biohazard! It kinda makes sense, but I've never heard of having to have a separate fridge.
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Cat Herder 10:56 AM 10-10-2013
Originally Posted by butterfly:

and to the biohazard! It kinda makes sense, but I've never heard of having to have a separate fridge.
I remember when we had to wear gloves to handle breastmilk and providers routinely declined to take breastfed infants...

The late 70's, 80's and early 90's were very "anti wet-sticky-not mine"

Have you read the current CDC Guidelines for the Handling and Storage of Human Milk??? or CDC "What to do if an infant or child is mistakenly fed another womans expressed breastmilk?" They use the abreviation HIV 9 times in two short paragraphs. Who wouldn't be a tad bit nervous?
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Blackcat31 11:11 AM 10-10-2013
Originally Posted by Cat Herder:
Have you read the current CDC Guidelines for the Handling and Storage of Human Milk??? or CDC "What to do if an infant or child is mistakenly fed another womans expressed breastmilk?" They use the abreviation HIV 9 times in two short paragraphs. Who wouldn't be a tad bit nervous?
http://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/rec...breastmilk.htm
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Unregistered 11:42 AM 10-10-2013
You're much more likely to get something like hepatitis from a dirty diaper than you're going to get HIV from a bottle of breastmilk. Plus, what are you going to do if the baby spits up on you? Going to walk around in a haz-mat suit all day? There have actually been studies that breastmilk might prevent HIV transmission. It's all pretty interesting.
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Unregistered 11:47 AM 10-10-2013
Are special precautions needed for handling breast milk?

No special precautions exist for handling expressed human milk, nor does the milk require special labeling. It is not considered a biohazard. The Universal Precautions to prevent the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis B virus, and other bloodborne pathogens do not apply to human milk.

http://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/disease/hiv.htm

above is from the CDC website so I'm confused about the separate fridge thing.
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craftymissbeth 11:50 AM 10-10-2013
Originally Posted by Unregistered:
Are special precautions needed for handling breast milk?

No special precautions exist for handling expressed human milk, nor does the milk require special labeling. It is not considered a biohazard. The Universal Precautions to prevent the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis B virus, and other bloodborne pathogens do not apply to human milk.

http://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/disease/hiv.htm

above is from the CDC website so I'm confused about the separate fridge thing.
And yet...

http://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/rec...thers_milk.htm
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Unregistered 11:54 AM 10-10-2013
No, that's different. Of course you have to take those precautions if a child actually ingests the milk. It does say that the risk of transmission is low and no case has ever been documented. I'm talking about the separate fridge and biohazard thing.
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Blackcat31 11:59 AM 10-10-2013
Originally Posted by Unregistered:
No, that's different. Of course you have to take those precautions if a child actually ingests the milk. It does say that the risk of transmission is low and no case has ever been documented. I'm talking about the separate fridge and biohazard thing.
Catherder said it was a state requirement for her as a child care provider....because it was once considered similar to a bio-hazard which requires separate storage.

Her comment about the separate fridge was more in reference to how slow her state is in changing to meet current standards.
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Cat Herder 12:03 PM 10-10-2013
Originally Posted by Unregistered:
No, that's different. Of course you have to take those precautions if a child actually ingests the milk. It does say that the risk of transmission is low and no case has ever been documented. I'm talking about the separate fridge and biohazard thing.
Oh, I agree with you I breastfed 3 of my own and only enroll infants, I have not had an infant that was not breastfed in many years.

The seperate mini-fridge for breastmilk storage is still in our mandatory training

Let me see if I can find the *stolen from paid training* slide.... I know I have shared it here before....
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Unregistered 12:06 PM 10-10-2013
not flaming, just honestly interested and curious. Of course the FDA site is down so I can't see anything on there about the food program or anything! @@
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Cat Herder 12:27 PM 10-10-2013
Originally Posted by Unregistered:
not flaming, just honestly interested and curious. Of course the FDA site is down so I can't see anything on there about the food program or anything! @@
**I use a separate freezer/fridge in the playroom so moms can bring it straight from work at pick-up to be placed in the freezer (most keep a week or more in storage here).

Most large centers here (deep south) use a "loophole" to stay within regulation.

Owners removed refrigerators from the classrooms completely. Then they require insulated bags with ice packs daily and that each bottle be pre-filled (with correct amounts for the feeding guidelines), labeled and be kept in each child's own cubbies. (* beyond the legal 6-8 hour "room-temp" limit)

After the last feeding all unused formula must be discarded with bottles returned to bag for disinfecting at home (most are in care 9-10 hours, many up to 12).
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blandino 12:31 PM 10-10-2013
Legally, we have to toss a breast milk (or formula bottle) if baby doesn't finish it. Sometimes that can be a decent amount of milk left. That is so precious to moms struggling to produce enough.

I may or may not bend the rules on that one if asked. Breastmilk is good at room temp for far longer than licensing rules dictate.
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Cat Herder 12:35 PM 10-10-2013
Originally Posted by Unregistered:
You're much more likely to get something like hepatitis from a dirty diaper than you're going to get HIV from a bottle of breastmilk. Plus, what are you going to do if the baby spits up on you? Going to walk around in a haz-mat suit all day? There have actually been studies that breastmilk might prevent HIV transmission. It's all pretty interesting.
I hear you!! Ironically I just had to change shoes because one of the *discount* storage bags had a small tear in the bottom inside corner as I picked it up to dip in the warmer....

Waking kids up with sticky shoes squeeking on my freshly mopped floors worry me more than the miniscule risk of transmission...
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Blackcat31 12:39 PM 10-10-2013
Originally Posted by Cat Herder:
I hear you!! Ironically I just had to change shoes because one of the *discount* storage bags had a small tear in the bottom inside corner as I picked it up to dip in the warmer....

Waking kids up with sticky shoes squeeking on my freshly mopped floors worry me more than the miniscule risk of transmission...
I keep all bags of breast milk inside bigger baggies for that exact reason.

Leakage goes into outer bag and not my shoes.
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Cat Herder 12:46 PM 10-10-2013
Originally Posted by Blackcat31:
I keep all bags of breast milk inside bigger baggies for that exact reason.

Leakage goes into outer bag and not my shoes.
Hmm.... noted

I'd like to thaw/transfer a days worth into that many bottles in the early mornings (while I'm preparing breakfast/lunch), but the bottles have become so expensive I'd hate to ask the moms to send in more than 2.

Of course, everyone uses a different brand (**new improved models coming out every 90 days ), many go through two or three until they find the right fit, so supplying them would almost impossible anymore.
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Cat Herder 12:58 PM 10-10-2013
Originally Posted by Unregistered:
not flaming, just honestly interested and curious. Of course the FDA site is down so I can't see anything on there about the food program or anything! @@
Hope this works... It was in a graph and I dont know how to make that copy over.


Birth through 3 months
46 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk2, 3
46 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk2, 3
46 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk2, 3

4 months through 7 months
48 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk2, 3
0-3 tablespoons infant cereal1, 4
48 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk2, 3
0-3 tablespoons infant cereal1, 4
0-3 tablespoons fruit and/or vegetable4
46 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk2, 3

8 months through 11 months
68 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk2, 3 and
24 tablespoons infant cereal1 and
14 tablespoons fruit and/or vegetable
68 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk2, 3
24 tablespoons infant cereal1 and
14 tablespoons fruit and/or vegetable
14 tablespoons meat, fish, poultry, egg yolk, or cooked dry beans or peas; or
2 ounces cheese, or
14 Tbsp cottage cheese, cheese food or cheese spread.
24 fluid ounces formula1 or breast milk2, 3 or fruit juice5
01/2 slice bread4, 6 or
02 crackers4, 6


1 Infant formula and dry infant cereal shall be iron-fortified. 2 It is recommended that breast milk be served in place of formula from birth through 11 months. 3 For some breastfed infants who regularly consume less than the minimum amount of breast milk per feeding, a serving of less than the minimum amount of breast milk may be offered, with additional breast milk offered if the infant is still hungry. 4 A serving of this component shall be optional. 5 Fruit juice shall be full-strength. 6 Bread and bread alternates shall be made from whole-grain or enriched meal or flourHope this works....
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Patches 11:11 AM 10-11-2013
Originally Posted by blandino:
Legally, we have to toss a breast milk (or formula bottle) if baby doesn't finish it. Sometimes that can be a decent amount of milk left. That is so precious to moms struggling to produce enough.

I may or may not bend the rules on that one if asked. Breastmilk is good at room temp for far longer than licensing rules dictate.
Same here
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tratliff 02:52 PM 10-11-2013
I understand breastmilk not being able to be re-used and what not. It's sad to me because breastmilk changes as baby grows and for the most part, the nutritional needs change to meet baby's current needs so the baby doesn't need to consume more and more at one time, like with formula. Question about those nutritional guideline, are they saying you have to start solids at 4 months? Seriously, my own children don't start solids until much later and newer recommendations are saying not to start before 6 months. Why do so many different sources say different things? And 6 ounces is just such a huge amount for such a tiny tummy! It just boggles my mind. Does it matter if you offer smaller bottles more frequently throughout the day, or are the requirements saying only to feed 3 times per day with large bottles? And, legally, what can they do if an infant refuses to eat the full bottle? I mean, come on, you can offer the bottle, but you can't make them eat. Ugh, more reasons I won't take infants... I wouldn't bend the rules but I would highly suggest moms sending premade bottles in small increments so less gets wasted.
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Tags:breast is best, breast milk, phobia, standard precautions, support breastfeeding
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