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Daycare Center and Family Home Forum>Are My Expectations Too Much?
childcaremom 05:35 PM 01-06-2016
That dcks actually sleep at daycare? And on a daycare schedule?

I think am thorough during my interviews. I specifically go over my BIG issues: naps (our schedules, my expectations), outdoor and illness. I email families a few weeks before they start and ask about scheduling.

The last two new starts have been awful. One, there was no schedule at all and she was a screamer. I tried for 4 months with her. Now this one is on a completely opposite schedule of us. Rocked to sleep with a warm bottle. Mom keeps telling me different stories so I don't know what is what. All of these things make me shake my head because 1: I told them that children need to be able to fall asleep independently (told them our routine - change bums, into bed, night night, done so NO bottles, NO rocking, NO rubbing backs, etc), and 2: I told them that these are our nap times and they are solid. That their child will be on that schedule.

I don't know what else I can do to make them understand.

How do you tell dcfs that their child needs to follow the daycare schedule? Do you have them align their child's schedule with the daycare schedule prior to starting care? Or is this part of my job/role... To transition the newbie in?

I have told this new dcm that she will need to keep up the daycare schedule on the weekend to assist with the transitioning but I really just would like to say "Hey, your kid is suffering. Help your kid succeed and set the schedule, which you effectively chose by choosing my daycare?

Does anyone else experience this or is it just me? I have honestly never had issues with naps until this group so it is boggling my mind. I just termed one who was a nap screamer. Would like to term another who just doesn't sleep. And now this one. (and they are all toddlers under 18 mos). So many interviews and almost all of them have nap issues.

I am putting an ad out "Dc has an opening for a napper ONLY, available for an immediate start".
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daycare 06:31 PM 01-06-2016
depending on the age of the child and how often they attend, I always give a trial period first. If the child is younger, the trail is a little longer.

during the trial period it allows me to see what the issues are. Then I will immediately address them with the parents and it is the parents responsibility to help get their child on schedule with us. If during that trial I do not see improvement, then I will let the family go. I don't expect to see 100% resolution, but I do need to see that the families are trying to help back my rules and schedule and that the child is making some progress to adapting to our program.

I find that sometimes no matter how many times you tell some people things they just don't get it. Those people don't last long in my program.

I don't provide infant care, but if I did, I would require that they do not need "special" care above and beyond the normal call of duty that it takes to care for an infant.
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childcaremom 06:44 PM 01-06-2016
New dcg is 14 months. She is full time.

I have a 4 week transition/trial period.

I am open with my dcps, too, I just don't know what else I can do to make sure these dcks get off on the right foot.

I am just going to have to keep chatting with dcm.
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daycare 06:54 PM 01-06-2016
Originally Posted by childcaremom:
New dcg is 14 months. She is full time.

I have a 4 week transition/trial period.

I am open with my dcps, too, I just don't know what else I can do to make sure these dcks get off on the right foot.

I am just going to have to keep chatting with dcm.
really it is the only thing that you can do. I would ask the daycare parents to try and help the child to nap during the same time on the weekends if possible, just to help keep the consistency and help the child adjust.

I would also let mom know when they are about two weeks in how things are going and be very honest with dcm about what is going on and what they need to do to help fix it.

Of course, you will know if the parents are doing as you asked and are helping the child. and you will know if they are not.
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MunchkinWrangler 08:33 PM 01-06-2016
I had a bad napper who is now a year old and after tireless sleep training here napped like a champ after a grueling 6 months of consistency. I am now dealing with a 9 month old who is a bad napper, but I knew what I was getting into. The parents are actually looking to me to help them with it. I must be crazy but she is coming from a center and they don't think they were doing a good job, hence the reason they found an in home provider like me.
I am very big on napping, it's important for their growth and I have a talk with all parents coming in that I expect consistent nap schedules and if after a reasonable amount of time if their child can't "get with the program" it won't be a good fit. My son has always been a great napper and needs it or he's a mess so this is a big issue with me because it will affect my personal life.
That's all I hear is they nap for 30 minutes and for some reason the parents think that's good, it's not. I don't get also why people want you to rock, read a book, sing a song, etc. It's a crutch and I never did it with my own because what if you can't and you can't expect other people to do it, in my opinion.
I also have found that I am always told the opposite of what a new child does and after a couple days I can pinpoint what the reality is.
The only way it will be a success is if they do the same at home otherwise it won't ever change. That's how I had succes with my dcg who's 1, the parents couldn't get why she'd sleep here but not at home, now they're happy, I'm happy, dcg is happy and well rested. It depends on how much time you are willing to put up with it and also how it affects the group. I really hope they will work with you as so far, this is the only way it has worked for me.
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Tags:nap - crying, nap - not
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