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Reggio / Waldorf / Forest Kindergarten / Granola / Natural - Learning Methods>Rie
BlackBear 11:10 AM 10-28-2013
Anyone run a RIE inspired daycare? I only heard about it last summer and have been reading Janet Lansbury website.
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nothingwithoutjoy 11:24 AM 10-28-2013
When I took infants, the way I cared for them was definitely inspired by RIE. Lots of floor time, no "containers," no sitting or standing them until they did it on their own, lots of respectful communication.
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Heidi 12:23 PM 10-28-2013
I love the concept, and years ago worked with a provider who studied at RIE with Magda.

My only argument, however, is that it's not completely practically based. Most of us have mixed age groups (including mixed age families). RIE, while very respectful of the infant, isn't always very realistic.

For example, at RIE, and infant should CHOOSE when they want to sleep. They have mats on the floor so that infants can crawl over and catch a nap. Okay, first of all, in my state, that's against licensing regs. Second, I would not be okay with my (fictional-mine are grown) crawling in and out of bed a night when they "feel" like sleeping. I'm very authoritarian when it comes to sleep. I decide...they don't. To me, it's called being a parent.

Another example is child-sized furniture. In an dc center, sure. In a home, it's awesome to have a little table and chairs for your toddler to play at or have a snack at. Sure, it empowers them. But, it's also good for a child to learn that they are part of a bigger world, and to be part of a social group. My kids sit at the table with us. We eat as a family. Me sitting on the floor so that they're comfortable is not really respecting ME, and I am the "elder" here. KWIM?
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nothingwithoutjoy 03:27 PM 10-28-2013
Originally Posted by Heidi:
For example, at RIE, and infant should CHOOSE when they want to sleep. They have mats on the floor so that infants can crawl over and catch a nap. Okay, first of all, in my state, that's against licensing regs. Second, I would not be okay with my (fictional-mine are grown) crawling in and out of bed a night when they "feel" like sleeping. I'm very authoritarian when it comes to sleep. I decide...they don't. To me, it's called being a parent.

Another example is child-sized furniture. In an dc center, sure. In a home, it's awesome to have a little table and chairs for your toddler to play at or have a snack at. Sure, it empowers them. But, it's also good for a child to learn that they are part of a bigger world, and to be part of a social group. My kids sit at the table with us. We eat as a family. Me sitting on the floor so that they're comfortable is not really respecting ME, and I am the "elder" here. KWIM?
Yes, I definitely used what was practical for us. Also, I might be considered an "attachment parenting" parent, so some of that is in conflict if you are very strict about interpretation. But it certainly informed my thinking.

The crawl-in beds are also used in Reggio infant centers, and opened my eyes to possibilities. That said, only a very exhausted baby is going to chose to nap when big kids are roaming all around being loud. I followed infants' own schedules, but put them in a pack-n-play. (However, I did move them to mats quite soon, and used a mattress on the floor for my own daughter, never a crib.) (I'm pretty authoritarian about sleep, too.)

Your thing about "respecting me" is something I learned from Reggio. Before that, it seemed that adult furniture was considered taboo in early childhood classrooms. But they emphasize making adults comfortable and welcome, too. The balance in my home is kid-sized table/chairs for daytime meals with the kids (I sit on an adult-sized ottoman that makes me comfortable there) and kid-sized stools and table in the studio. But at dinner, we eat at the dining-room table, my daughter with us. Always family-style. A mix of each of us accommodating the other.
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BlackBear 05:48 PM 10-28-2013
Great points!
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cheerfuldom 07:22 AM 12-23-2013
I really like Janet's website and have read it for several years. Lots of good inspiration there and I follow the basic principles with my infants. I think the biggest thing is that while a few of the techniques may seem a little extreme, I think the whole idea does combat helicopter parenting or container/restraining parenting. Babies are encouraged to play independently with supervision but little intervention. No equipment or propping into unnatural positions that baby gets addicted to. But also the parent is told to step back, step out of babies play, not entertain, but provide wholesome natural activities that are age appropriate. Also allowing baby to met milestones in their own way in their own time. I thought of her advice a lot when my 17 month old was still not walking! Not to push or pressure or compare kids or be alarmed if your child is doing something a bit out of the ordinary. A lot of it is very common sense but something today's parents NEED.
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MarinaVanessa 09:30 AM 12-24-2013
I love it. There's a convention next year in March I believe in Los Angeles, CA for any of you that are in CA. They have great workshops both for beginners and those already familiar withRIE and of course Polly Ellam will be there. Not sure if that is who Heidi was referring to but Polly studied under Magda. I will definitely be going
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Heidi 03:50 PM 12-25-2013
Originally Posted by MarinaVanessa:
I love it. There's a convention next year in March I believe in Los Angeles, CA for any of you that are in CA. They have great workshops both for beginners and those already familiar withRIE and of course Polly Ellam will be there. Not sure if that is who Heidi was referring to but Polly studied under Magda. I will definitely be going
No, my friend Karen studied at RIE years ago. She's now retired and living in Florida.

I do try to minimize contraptions and pushing milestones, but it's an uphill battle sometimes. Parent's just think it's so "cute" to make their child seem precocious. Baby can't sit up or crawl yet, but oh, look, they can stand! Wow! Same kiddo that can't play 5 minutes without being held, rocked, talked to, or fed. I'd much prefer they have a true independent skill like that then being forced into milestones still months away.
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Cat Herder 06:50 AM 01-16-2014
Who knew I'd like a childcare "trend"....

We keep going in circles; bubble wrap to free range and back to bubble wrap....

I like the free range with outlet covers and soft flooring. It used to be called common sense....
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cheerfuldom 02:20 PM 05-02-2014
Originally Posted by Cat Herder:
Who knew I'd like a childcare "trend"....

We keep going in circles; bubble wrap to free range and back to bubble wrap....

I like the free range with outlet covers and soft flooring. It used to be called common sense....
ha ha, yeah thats me. I hate labels with parenting because it boxes you in and then you dont consider good ideas from other parenting styles. We co-sleep and babywear with our infants but also own strollers and exersaucers. I don't hover at playgrounds but I dont allow drop off parties or sleepovers (my oldest is 6.5). My babies get a lot of floor time but I also want to soak in those baby months so yeah, i hold babies a lot and dont want to push a huge amount of independent play......just trying to find a happy medium about everything. again, common sense
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MarinaVanessa 02:50 PM 05-02-2014
The beauty of RIE is that it specifically says that parents should do what feels best for them. They say take what you like and use it and don't use what you're not comfortable with. It really is common sense parenting and one of their principles is safe environments. If you locked yourself out of your house with your baby inside for 4 hours will your baby be safe?

The only "weird" thing about RIE is that they don't use highchairs, bumbos, excersaucers etc. But that's pretty much because of another principle about respecting the child. If the child can't get into a certain position (stomach, sitting, standing) or into a device on their own then the child should not be put into them etc (that's their belief). This stems from their thinking that the child will become dependent on us and learn that they are incapable without us.

Some of it is a little extreme but for the most part I try to implement as much of it as seems realistic for group care. A lot of their principles come from the attachment theory (not attachment parenting).
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CityGarden 12:10 AM 03-28-2016
Originally Posted by BlackBear:
Anyone run a RIE inspired daycare? I only heard about it last summer and have been reading Janet Lansbury website.
I personally studied under Janey Lansbury in the Parent & Child class for just shy of 2.5 years and absolutely adore her!!! I also was the last class to study in the home of Magda Gerber.

RIE truly is the foundation of play-based, waldorf, montessori, reggio, etc. The largest gift our RIE experience gave was communication and respect. You have a baby only months old ---- you have to learn not only the crys and what they mean but the grunts, the moans etc. and what they mean. You have to know how to hang back and let them work it out and when to encourage them to try it "next time" ---- I still use so much of RIE with my 9 year old as she enters the tween faze. I am such a HUGE fan of it.
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CalCare 08:51 PM 03-28-2016
Hi City Garden This is an old thread. I think you and I seem to have a lot of similarities in ECE philosophy. I too am convinced that RIE principles are so right on with what kids need. Most any quality program for infants and toddlers where I am is RIE. I also continue to use RIE principles with my older children as well as (try my best to) use NVC which is for grown peeps and is very RIE like.
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CityGarden 04:07 AM 03-29-2016
Hi CalCare ----- I also took classes on NVC!!!

We do seem similar in approach.

Sometimes (since I am new) I like to bump subjects that interest me!

Are you in the LA area?
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CalCare 08:34 AM 03-29-2016
No, I'm not. I'm central coast. I feel weird broadcasting my specific location but I lived in LA for awhile and I loved it. I might go to that outdoor classroom level one training in the spring. Idk. It's $350.
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CityGarden 08:09 PM 04-05-2016
Originally Posted by CalCare:
No, I'm not. I'm central coast. I feel weird broadcasting my specific location but I lived in LA for awhile and I loved it. I might go to that outdoor classroom level one training in the spring. Idk. It's $350.
I completely understand (and respect) that. We do seem to share similar views so we will have to connect as I get further along this patch
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jenboo 09:46 AM 06-20-2016
I just looked into RIE and from what I'm seeing, i really like it. It sounds mostly like how my husband and I parent.
My daycare is 24 months and under and I would like up eventually market at RIE.
Where is the best place to find more information? Which books are the best. I just downloaded one to read.
I would love to go training next year in LA too.
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MarinaVanessa 11:06 AM 06-21-2016
Originally Posted by jenboo:
I just looked into RIE and from what I'm seeing, i really like it. It sounds mostly like how my husband and I parent.
My daycare is 24 months and under and I would like up eventually market at RIE.
Where is the best place to find more information? Which books are the best. I just downloaded one to read.
I would love to go training next year in LA too.
If you're just starting out then I recommend the RIE Manual for sure as a start.
Your Self Confident Baby by Magda Gerber or
Baby Knows Best by Deborah Solomon are also great.

If you're a visual person like me subscribe to their YouTube channel. Here's one of my favorite videos, especially what she says in the last part:
It's only 1 1/2 minutes long
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JljBhZPNOPM
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jenboo 11:36 AM 06-21-2016
Originally Posted by MarinaVanessa:
If you're just starting out then I recommend the RIE Manual for sure as a start.
Your Self Confident Baby by Magda Gerber or
Baby Knows Best by Deborah Solomon are also great.

If you're a visual person like me subscribe to their YouTube channel. Here's one of my favorite videos, especially what she says in the last part:
It's only 1 1/2 minutes long
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JljBhZPNOPM
Thank you! I'm very visual Stu the YouTube channel is fabulous!
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Tags:janet lansbury, resources for infant educarers, rie
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