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  #1  
Old 12-19-2016, 10:40 AM
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Default Permission Slips & Contract

Three part question

I've read many providers have separate permission slips/forms for water activities, medication administration, photography, transporting, etc...

1. Do all of these need to be their own form / a separate piece of paper? Or can I just include it all in my contract? I hate the idea of wasting paper and having a bunch of extra forms for enrollment. I was thinking of having the following style of sub-sections in my contract:

Parent: Water Activities - please check one:
___ Yes, my child has permission to participate in water activities. This includes, but isnít limited to: sprinklers, inflatable bounce slide, kiddie pools, and bathing when necessary.
___ No, I do not give my child permission to participate in water activities.

Parent: Medication Administration - please check one:
___ Yes, Provider has my permission to administer OTC medications as needed. This includes, but isn't limited to: ointment, sunscreen, bugspray, lotion, and oral medications.
___ No, my child does not have permission to have any OTC medications administered to him/her.

Parent: Photography Permission - please check one:
___ Yes, my child has permission to be photographed. Photos may be shared to promote the daycare program.
___ No, my child does not have permission to be photographed. I understand my child may still end up in photos, but his/her face will be blurred or covered before sharing.

Parent: Transporting Permission - please check one:
___ Yes, my child has permission to be transported by the Provider for field trips, outings, or appointments if necessary.
___ No, I do not give permission for my child to be transported.


2. What if a parent doesn't give permission for something like water activities? Do you just say "Sorry, but I can't sign/agree to this because I can't accommodate one child being left out if the group is playing in the sprinkler." It seems silly to give them a choice if they don't really have one.

3. If my program isn't going to accommodate a 'No' response, should I change my contract to not give 'No' as an option and just have them initial a statement saying "I give X permission for X"? This seems like the obvious answer but what the heck, I'll ask anyways!
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  #2  
Old 12-19-2016, 10:57 AM
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Blackcat31 Blackcat31 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Max View Post
Three part question

I've read many providers have separate permission slips/forms for water activities, medication administration, photography, transporting, etc...

1. Do all of these need to be their own form / a separate piece of paper? Or can I just include it all in my contract? I hate the idea of wasting paper and having a bunch of extra forms for enrollment. I was thinking of having the following style of sub-sections in my contract:

Parent: Water Activities - please check one:
___ Yes, my child has permission to participate in water activities. This includes, but isnít limited to: sprinklers, inflatable bounce slide, kiddie pools, and bathing when necessary.
___ No, I do not give my child permission to participate in water activities.

Parent: Medication Administration - please check one:
___ Yes, Provider has my permission to administer OTC medications as needed. This includes, but isn't limited to: ointment, sunscreen, bugspray, lotion, and oral medications.
___ No, my child does not have permission to have any OTC medications administered to him/her.

Parent: Photography Permission - please check one:
___ Yes, my child has permission to be photographed. Photos may be shared to promote the daycare program.
___ No, my child does not have permission to be photographed. I understand my child may still end up in photos, but his/her face will be blurred or covered before sharing.

Parent: Transporting Permission - please check one:
___ Yes, my child has permission to be transported by the Provider for field trips, outings, or appointments if necessary.
___ No, I do not give permission for my child to be transported.


2. What if a parent doesn't give permission for something like water activities? Do you just say "Sorry, but I can't sign/agree to this because I can't accommodate one child being left out if the group is playing in the sprinkler." It seems silly to give them a choice if they don't really have one.

3. If my program isn't going to accommodate a 'No' response, should I change my contract to not give 'No' as an option and just have them initial a statement saying "I give X permission for X"? This seems like the obvious answer but what the heck, I'll ask anyways!
You can have all the permissions be on one page or within your contract but you will need to make sure the parent answers each one specifically so there is no "gray" or opening in which a parent can say they did not give explicit permission.

I have mine on separate sheets.

As for parents not wanting to give permission, you are required to ask and required to provide alternate activities or have back up supervision for those times in which a parent does not want to give permission.

You are also within your rights to not accept a parent that says no to any of those things but personally, I think that's a risky move and limits your pool of clientele.

As far as simply not giving them an option, that works too but you still have to have their written permission to participate so if there isn't a "no" option, you still have to have a signature saying "yes". Make sense?
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  #3  
Old 12-19-2016, 11:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
As for parents not wanting to give permission, you are required to ask and required to provide alternate activities or have back up supervision for those times in which a parent does not want to give permission.

You are also within your rights to not accept a parent that says no to any of those things but personally, I think that's a risky move and limits your pool of clientele.

As far as simply not giving them an option, that works too but you still have to have their written permission to participate so if there isn't a "no" option, you still have to have a signature saying "yes". Make sense?
Yes, that makes sense needing a written 'yes', thank you

If a parent checked 'No' to the Water Activities section, I would feel pretty bad not letting one of the kiddos play in a sprinkler or something, while watching all the other kids have fun in the water.. So it seemed like it would be easier to not give a choice. But I guess that's me being perhaps a little too sympathetic Maybe a better strategy - keep the option there but explain to parents that the water activity would still happen, their child would just be left out? Or they have to pick up?

If a parent checks 'No' to Transporting, would you recommend to just let it be but require the parent to pick up or keep the child home on a day we wanted to go out?
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Old 12-19-2016, 11:42 AM
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Blackcat31 Blackcat31 is offline
 
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Yes, that makes sense needing a written 'yes', thank you

If a parent checked 'No' to the Water Activities section, I would feel pretty bad not letting one of the kiddos play in a sprinkler or something, while watching all the other kids have fun in the water.. So it seemed like it would be easier to not give a choice. But I guess that's me being perhaps a little too sympathetic Maybe a better strategy - keep the option there but explain to parents that the water activity would still happen, their child would just be left out? Or they have to pick up?
Yep, totally sucks but I am ALWAYS clear for parents that say no that the others WILL be doing X and that YOU (the parent) need to make sure their child understands that it was YOU (the parent) that is limiting their activities. kwim?

If the parent fails to explain it, I will reinforce with something empathetic for the child, "I'm sorry Billy but your mom says no. I wish I could say yes, but you need to talk to your mom about it." Something like that.

If they are too young to understand that, it's usually not a big deal because often times the younger kids aren't allowed to do things the older kids do...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Max View Post
If a parent checks 'No' to Transporting, would you recommend to just let it be but require the parent to pick up or keep the child home on a day we wanted to go out?
I do NOT transport (too much liability for my comfort) but if I did, I don't think I'd enroll a child that didn't have permission to be transported.... it's one thing to have a child sit on the step while the others played in the sprinkler but what do you do with the one child who can't be transported when you take the rest?

Unless you have an assistant that can stay back at your house with the child, transportation is a hard one to work around.
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  #5  
Old 12-19-2016, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
I do NOT transport (too much liability for my comfort) but if I did, I don't think I'd enroll a child that didn't have permission to be transported.... it's one thing to have a child sit on the step while the others played in the sprinkler but what do you do with the one child who can't be transported when you take the rest?

Unless you have an assistant that can stay back at your house with the child, transportation is a hard one to work around.
I don't think I'm going to transport much but I want to have the option there for days when I have a smaller group. Or in case I have an appointment at the end of the day and a parent is running late and my DH can't cover... Then my bases are covered if I end up having to bring the child with me (I have a whole policy on this - hoping it never comes up!)

I read another provider had a DCM who didn't want DCG going to a splash pad, so on those days, DCM had to pick the child up or drop off later in the day (after the group got back).

All in all, I agree that it's tough to work around.
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  #6  
Old 12-20-2016, 07:15 PM
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284878 284878 is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Max View Post
Three part question

I've read many providers have separate permission slips/forms for water activities, medication administration, photography, transporting, etc...

1. Do all of these need to be their own form / a separate piece of paper? Or can I just include it all in my contract? I hate the idea of wasting paper and having a bunch of extra forms for enrollment. I was thinking of having the following style of sub-sections in my contract:

Parent: Water Activities - please check one:
___ Yes, my child has permission to participate in water activities. This includes, but isnít limited to: sprinklers, inflatable bounce slide, kiddie pools, and bathing when necessary.
___ No, I do not give my child permission to participate in water activities.

Parent: Medication Administration - please check one:
___ Yes, Provider has my permission to administer OTC medications as needed. This includes, but isn't limited to: ointment, sunscreen, bugspray, lotion, and oral medications.
___ No, my child does not have permission to have any OTC medications administered to him/her.

Parent: Photography Permission - please check one:
___ Yes, my child has permission to be photographed. Photos may be shared to promote the daycare program.
___ No, my child does not have permission to be photographed. I understand my child may still end up in photos, but his/her face will be blurred or covered before sharing.

Parent: Transporting Permission - please check one:
___ Yes, my child has permission to be transported by the Provider for field trips, outings, or appointments if necessary.
___ No, I do not give permission for my child to be transported.


2. What if a parent doesn't give permission for something like water activities? Do you just say "Sorry, but I can't sign/agree to this because I can't accommodate one child being left out if the group is playing in the sprinkler." It seems silly to give them a choice if they don't really have one.

3. If my program isn't going to accommodate a 'No' response, should I change my contract to not give 'No' as an option and just have them initial a statement saying "I give X permission for X"? This seems like the obvious answer but what the heck, I'll ask anyways!

My permission slip is written up with each item then a spot for parent to initial.
I give name of dc permission to ..... Parent initial ______
Then at the bottom it says something like, I agree to the permission slips above that I (parent name) have initialed.
Then have them sign.
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  #7  
Old 12-20-2016, 08:44 PM
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LysesKids LysesKids is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Max View Post
Three part question

I've read many providers have separate permission slips/forms for water activities, medication administration, photography, transporting, etc...

1. Do all of these need to be their own form / a separate piece of paper? Or can I just include it all in my contract? I hate the idea of wasting paper and having a bunch of extra forms for enrollment. I was thinking of having the following style of sub-sections in my contract:

Parent: Water Activities - please check one:
___ Yes, my child has permission to participate in water activities. This includes, but isn’t limited to: sprinklers, inflatable bounce slide, kiddie pools, and bathing when necessary.
___ No, I do not give my child permission to participate in water activities.

Parent: Medication Administration - please check one:
___ Yes, Provider has my permission to administer OTC medications as needed. This includes, but isn't limited to: ointment, sunscreen, bugspray, lotion, and oral medications.
___ No, my child does not have permission to have any OTC medications administered to him/her.

Parent: Photography Permission - please check one:
___ Yes, my child has permission to be photographed. Photos may be shared to promote the daycare program.
___ No, my child does not have permission to be photographed. I understand my child may still end up in photos, but his/her face will be blurred or covered before sharing.

Parent: Transporting Permission - please check one:
___ Yes, my child has permission to be transported by the Provider for field trips, outings, or appointments if necessary.
___ No, I do not give permission for my child to be transported.


2. What if a parent doesn't give permission for something like water activities? Do you just say "Sorry, but I can't sign/agree to this because I can't accommodate one child being left out if the group is playing in the sprinkler." It seems silly to give them a choice if they don't really have one.

3. If my program isn't going to accommodate a 'No' response, should I change my contract to not give 'No' as an option and just have them initial a statement saying "I give X permission for X"? This seems like the obvious answer but what the heck, I'll ask anyways!
I always have permissions separated - and I make sure parents know I do not transport for any reason... I call 911 in emergencies & parents are responsible for cost... including if they don't answer calls
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Old 12-21-2016, 08:54 PM
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nothingwithoutjoy nothingwithoutjoy is offline
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When giving parents a choice on a permission slip, I am really upfront about my reasons for asking, in essence, saying "this is what we do; I need your permission." For example, I have a 2-part photo permission. The first part "asks" permission to take photos to use internally (with the kids, on our private blog, with teachers when I present workshops). I am clear that this use of photos is essential to the way I teach. The second part asks permission to post photos to my business facebook page or in other advertising. I am clear that that section is completely optional and that they should sign only if they are really comfortable with it.
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Old 12-22-2016, 06:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Max View Post
I don't think I'm going to transport much but I want to have the option there for days when I have a smaller group. Or in case I have an appointment at the end of the day and a parent is running late and my DH can't cover... Then my bases are covered if I end up having to bring the child with me (I have a whole policy on this - hoping it never comes up!)

I read another provider had a DCM who didn't want DCG going to a splash pad, so on those days, DCM had to pick the child up or drop off later in the day (after the group got back).

All in all, I agree that it's tough to work around.
Yes, make sure you have a policy on this specifically.
When parents give permission to transport it really should be specific (ie field trips, preschool runs twice daily M & W's etc)

Do NOT assume that when a parent gives permission to transport for those specific activities that it also gives permission for you to take the child to an appointment if they are running behind etc (as in your example)...many times you are not allowed (by licensing and/or insurance) to transport outside of your legal business hours or allowed to use permission slips as a cover all for ALL transportation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nothingwithoutjoy View Post
When giving parents a choice on a permission slip, I am really upfront about my reasons for asking, in essence, saying "this is what we do; I need your permission." For example, I have a 2-part photo permission. The first part "asks" permission to take photos to use internally (with the kids, on our private blog, with teachers when I present workshops). I am clear that this use of photos is essential to the way I teach. The second part asks permission to post photos to my business facebook page or in other advertising. I am clear that that section is completely optional and that they should sign only if they are really comfortable with it.
I think it's a great idea to separate the reasons for photographs like you did!

I do want to mention though that for those providers that do use photos in their advertising that you should also make sure you add a clause to your permission slips that the photos belong to you and that you will not remove them from your advertising if the family leave....

I can just imagine the headache of sorting through all your advertising materials trying to edit our a kid who's family left on bad terms and wants all their kids photos taken down.
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Old 12-25-2016, 08:34 PM
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Make sure everything falls in line with your state! Honestly I've never even thought of a permission slip for water play (our state makes you jump through hoops fire for containers of water- so no kiddie pools here!) We tell parents "as of this date we will be playing with the sprinklers at least 3* a week please provide xyz, if you don't your child will not be allowed to play with the sprinklers and if it's a day that is too hot, they will not be taken out"

For OTC we have a state regulated sheet as well and we have a transportation form through the state. Because our children are so young we rarely take actual trips- we typically do one annual trip to the farm.

We have our own permission slip that is attached to enrollment packets for walking to the neighborhood park- for us that's really the only one that can be on the contract.

We have a separate social media release where we allow parents to exclude some forms, ex some will say the website is okay but no Facebook and we have a videotaping form which parents MUST consent to or their child cannot attend- this is for cameras that are on 24/7 in the daycare should they need to ever be reviewed.

I can show you our forms if you want to PM me!
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