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Old 11-01-2016, 08:02 AM
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Default Mildly Ill Care Room

Ran across an old thread regarding sick policies where CatHerder mentioned a Mildly Ill Care Room to continue care for kids who are sick - passive supervision (sight and or sound) with monitors, charging higher rates, keeping the 24/48 rule for the main playroom...

I've never heard of this. Does anyone have one or know how it works? What do the parents think about it? How difficult is it to manage if you are the only provider?

I think it would be great for some illnesses but I can't imagine cleaning a child who is puking or having diarrhea repeatedly

Granted, when my son is throwing up it only takes 1-2 pukes before he has it all out of his system and (after learning the hard way) he won't throw up again as long as I pace/limit him with eating crackers and drinking water.
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Old 11-01-2016, 08:23 AM
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To me, mildly ill means cold like symptoms. Runny nose, cough, etc. Kind like "I could go to work, but I just want to lay in bed all day and will heal faster if I do" symptoms.

Anything beyond that I would worry about the liability of a child getting worse fast while in my care. Especially if fevers, vomiting or diarrhea were involved.
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Old 11-01-2016, 08:38 AM
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Obviously I offer this service.

It really is simple. It works exactly as your own child's room if they were home sick from school.

Case by case basis, on what I can easily manage while caring for whatever issues I am dealing with in my current group.

I expect it would be even easier to manage in group or center care with a little creativity.
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Old 11-01-2016, 08:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Herder View Post
Obviously I offer this service.

It really is simple. It works exactly as your own child's room if they were home sick from school.

Case by case basis, on what I can easily manage while caring for whatever issues I am dealing with in my current group.

I expect it would be even easier to manage in group or center care with a little creativity.
It sounds like a great way to make a program stand out!

Do you have a policy on this you wouldn't mind sharing?
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Old 11-01-2016, 08:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Baby Beluga View Post
To me, mildly ill means cold like symptoms. Runny nose, cough, etc. Kind like "I could go to work, but I just want to lay in bed all day and will heal faster if I do" symptoms.

Anything beyond that I would worry about the liability of a child getting worse fast while in my care. Especially if fevers, vomiting or diarrhea were involved.
Yeah, that's what I was thinking would be scary. But I guess if it's *truly* mild symptoms, then it wouldn't be so bad.

Think there should be an age requirement on this too? Excluding kids 2 and under from using the mildly ill care room at all?
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Old 11-01-2016, 09:23 AM
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"The medical community questions the effectiveness of excluding ill children as a means of decreasing the transmission of many common childhood infections. Pediatricians also argue that care by a familiar provider in a familiar place is optimal for sick children. As a result, the medical community suggests that children with common childhood illnesses can be fully integrated into the child care setting as long as they are well enough to participate and the provider is able care for them and the other children (e.g., American Academy of Pediatrics, 1999; Aronson, 1987)

Young children enrolled in child care can have a high incidence of illness such as upper respiratory tract infections, including otitis media and other temporary conditions such as eczema, diarrhea and exacerbation of asthma that may not allow them to participate in the usual activities. As such, I provide care for mildly ill children on a case by case basis. If a child becomes ill during the day, I can help manage the illness and keep the child comfortable until a designated adult arrives at your request.

Decision on availability and fee will be made on a case-by-case basis.

Severity Level 1: >>>insert price here<<<

Child feels well enough and shows high interest in participating in activities because of an absence of symptoms of illness such as recovery from pink eye, rash or chicken pox. Appropriate activities for this level include most of the normal activities for the Childs age and developmental level, including both indoor and outdoor play. For full recovery, children at this level need no special care other than medication administration (according to the policy) and observation.

Severity Level 2: >>>insert price here<<<

Childs demonstrates a medium activity level because of symptoms such as low-grade fever. Child may also be at the beginning or recovery period of an illness. Appropriate activities include crafts, puzzles, table games, fantasy play, and the opportunity to move about the room freely.

Severity Level 3: >>>insert price here<<<

Childs activity level is low because of symptoms that prevent much involvement. Appropriate activities are sleep and rest; light meals and liquids; passive activities such as stories and music; and for children who need physical comforting, being held and rocked (especially children under three years of age)."

A little room prep and separate play areas make it manageable.
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Old 11-01-2016, 09:46 AM
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Accepting sick kids definitely makes me stand out from the rest of the businesses in my area!

The problem (if any), is in the dkp definition of "mild symptoms"
...and even if you have the most clear and defined policy, with their signature, it still doesn't stop some dkp from trying to drop off their VERY sick kid
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Old 11-01-2016, 10:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Herder View Post
"The medical community questions the effectiveness of excluding ill children as a means of decreasing the transmission of many common childhood infections. Pediatricians also argue that care by a familiar provider in a familiar place is optimal for sick children. As a result, the medical community suggests that children with common childhood illnesses can be fully integrated into the child care setting as long as they are well enough to participate and the provider is able care for them and the other children (e.g., American Academy of Pediatrics, 1999; Aronson, 1987)

Young children enrolled in child care can have a high incidence of illness such as upper respiratory tract infections, including otitis media and other temporary conditions such as eczema, diarrhea and exacerbation of asthma that may not allow them to participate in the usual activities. As such, I provide care for mildly ill children on a case by case basis. If a child becomes ill during the day, I can help manage the illness and keep the child comfortable until a designated adult arrives at your request.

Decision on availability and fee will be made on a case-by-case basis.

Severity Level 1: >>>insert price here<<<

Child feels well enough and shows high interest in participating in activities because of an absence of symptoms of illness such as recovery from pink eye, rash or chicken pox. Appropriate activities for this level include most of the normal activities for the Childs age and developmental level, including both indoor and outdoor play. For full recovery, children at this level need no special care other than medication administration (according to the policy) and observation.

Severity Level 2: >>>insert price here<<<

Childs demonstrates a medium activity level because of symptoms such as low-grade fever. Child may also be at the beginning or recovery period of an illness. Appropriate activities include crafts, puzzles, table games, fantasy play, and the opportunity to move about the room freely.

Severity Level 3: >>>insert price here<<<

Childs activity level is low because of symptoms that prevent much involvement. Appropriate activities are sleep and rest; light meals and liquids; passive activities such as stories and music; and for children who need physical comforting, being held and rocked (especially children under three years of age)."

A little room prep and separate play areas make it manageable.
Great info Thank you for sharing!

So if it's Severity Level 1 or 2, does the child go into a separate play area (or is kept away from others)? Is the separate play area a different room?

ETA: Does Severity Level 1 mean there are no symptoms? The child is just known to be recovering from an illness?

Last edited by Max; 11-01-2016 at 10:31 AM. Reason: another question :)
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Old 11-01-2016, 10:30 AM
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Do you do this on your own or with an assistant?

Sorry for all the questions, it really intrigues me!
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Old 11-01-2016, 10:57 AM
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It is based on the childs needs and cause of illness.

I can keep them in a separate room, with their own toys, if I fear spread of illness.

Ex: Common cold/URI/OM. Level 2. Sneezing, runny nose, coughing, headache, irritable, sore throat, etc. Separate room, separate toys, humidifier, push fluids, pj's, chicken & stars, mid-day soak bath in johnsons lavender/eucalyptus vapor bath, mid day linen change, tylenol/motrin/antibiotics as needed, TLC.

Ex: Confirmed/treated conjunctivitis/HFM. Level 1 need BUT care at Level 2 because still contagious. Separate room, separate toys, care/cleaning of eye/rash with saline, 2x linen change, 2x clothing change, fluids, mid-day colloidal oatmeal bath, extra crafts/color wonder/Spirograph, separate playground.

Ex: IDDM/Hypogycemia. Level 1 need and care. Unstable glucose, between med doses. Same room, monitor glucose levels, document consumption/exertion, modify diet, call if outside of specified limits (I rarely charge for these. I keep the fee possibility listed in case I need to stock lancets/preps/ etc.

I have instant access to an assistant if needed. It rarely happens, though.
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Old 11-02-2016, 09:06 AM
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I also do this. It is listed in my policy that sick care will be provided at my discretion. I isolate the sick child from the others. I generally limit their activities to quiet things - books, coloring, electronic educational toy. Everything gets sanitized after s/he leaves for the day. I have only been in business about 2 years, but I have yet to send home a sick child. I started to about 3 weeks ago when my 7-month-old dcb's fever spiked to 103, but it was within 30 minutes of her mom's regular pick up time. I have a medical background and was a LPN years back. Last week I had a 3-year-old that seemed to have a stomach virus. He threw up twice, but was able to get to the toilet both times. I provided him with a pail, but he ended up not throwing up anymore. I do think this sets me a bit apart from other dcps, especially the centers. I have a full-time assistant that makes this possible. I can't imagine doing it solo.
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Old 11-02-2016, 09:51 AM
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Thank you both for the insight

How do other parents feel about this? I worry it could potentially turn parents away b/c they don't want their child exposed to illnesses more than necessary.
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Old 11-02-2016, 07:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Max View Post
Thank you both for the insight

How do other parents feel about this? I worry it could potentially turn parents away b/c they don't want their child exposed to illnesses more than necessary.
My current clients are all public safety, medical, government employees and teachers. It was part of their decision to enroll with me.
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Old 11-07-2016, 07:30 PM
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My clients are similar to Cat Herder's and a couple that are in manufacturing, so they do appreciate this service. They trust my judgment to limit the group's exposure to the child that is ill. I have a few single moms that are on a drop-in basis and honestly can not afford to take off for their child's every sniffle.

The child that is sick generally is quite easy to care for. To me it is a win-win for everyone!
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Old 12-01-2016, 09:51 AM
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Another thought popped into my head - children's medical face masks.

Do you use them (or would you)? Why or why not? Any issues with licensing?

Seems like it would be a good way to keep an airborne illness from spreading if the child might be (or is) contagious but is well enough to not need to be in bed resting all day.

Obviously not for infants and toddlers. But maybe preschoolers and school age? Could also be turned into a learning opportunity.
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Old 12-01-2016, 10:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Max View Post
Another thought popped into my head - children's medical face masks.

Do you use them (or would you)? Why or why not? Any issues with licensing?

Seems like it would be a good way to keep an airborne illness from spreading if the child might be (or is) contagious but is well enough to not need to be in bed resting all day.

Obviously not for infants and toddlers. But maybe preschoolers and school age? Could also be turned into a learning opportunity.
I have masks we play with when we do Doctor dramatic play. They fall off all the time. I can't imagine trying to keep one on a little one all day. Not saying its not possible, just that it would be tricky. We also have masks for red air days (we live in an area of high air pollution) and licensing doesn't allow us out any longer in masks v no masks. It makes me feel a little better that their lungs are a LITTLE more protected but not enough data on it to make a difference to licensing. I'm sure the rules on that vary state to state.
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Old 12-01-2016, 10:35 AM
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I don't see the pediatric face masks taking off, here.

The onus stays with the adults.
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Old 12-01-2016, 11:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Herder View Post
I don't see the pediatric face masks taking off, here.

The onus stays with the adults.


My thoughts are that if you could teach a child to wear a mask, it would be just as easy or easier to teach same child to cover when coughing. etc.
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