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  #1  
Old 10-05-2012, 05:03 AM
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Default Capital Letters Or Lower Case First?

I'm seeing it both ways and wonder which way is most common. When you first start (my dck is 25 mo) working with letters, do you only introduce capital letters, only introduce lower case, or do both at the same time?
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Old 10-05-2012, 05:06 AM
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Preschools in my area do both at the same time to avoid later confusion.
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Old 10-05-2012, 05:24 AM
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As a former Kindergarten teacher myself, I always introduced them together. However, as soon as children start to practice writing the letters, or recognizing them in words, etc., it is always best to focus on lowercase letters. Children should learn to write their name appropriately in lowercase letters, except the first letter of course, and not in all caps. When you buy materials, make sure that they are lowercase, like playdough stampers, flashcards, etc.
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Old 10-05-2012, 07:17 AM
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I introduce both at the same time, but for some reason they always seem to gravitate and memorize the upper case letters first. I always teach them to write their names with 1 capital and the rest lowercase; but sometimes they intermix it based on what's easiest for them to write.
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Old 10-05-2012, 07:42 AM
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For writing or for reading?

For reading, introduce both at the same time because they will SEE both and need to know them in order to read. When they are good with the basic alphabet, make sure to expose them to other fonts too, in particular the freaky-looking lowercase g, and lowercase a <--yes exactly like that one, because it looks different from the way most of us write it.

For writing, kids learn uppercase first and easiest, and lowercase comes later. I intro'd both at the same time as my DD learned to write, and she gravitated mostly to the capital letters. She's in kindergarten now and they learn to write with the Handwriting Without Tears curriculum--which teaches uppoercase first and lowercase later, because developmentally, writing uppercase is easier. Consider getting the HWoT curriculum...it's really good!
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Old 10-05-2012, 08:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaisyMamma View Post
Preschools in my area do both at the same time to avoid later confusion.
That's exactly what I did/do

This also helps the child to learn sentences as well. Capital letter shows the beginning of the sentence and the period shows the end.
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Old 10-05-2012, 08:56 AM
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NOt that they are right, but I am a certified Zoo Phonics teacher and they teach that kids should learn all lower case letters first. The reason for this is because only 5% of what we read are capital letters.

However, I think that the reason that it works so well with zoo phonics, is because the letters are based off of animals. So both upper and lower case can be matched up easily, because the kids will be able to match up the animal to animal that is merged in the letter.

I truly live by Zoo Phonics. I love it. I am very impressed with the program and feel that it is a great way to teach children to read.

BTW. in Zoo Phonics, the kids learn the sounds of the letters before they learn the names of the letters..

So if you were to put the letters C-A-T out there, all of my kids can sound out the word, however, some of them will not know the names of the letters yet. So the reading actually sometimes occurs before they even know the names of the letters. Their theory is that children don't need to know the names of the letters to be able to read... While I know that some people may not agree with this, I am ok with it.
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Old 10-05-2012, 09:59 AM
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I do them together and say big A, little a, etc.

After we get the alphabet down, we do letter sounds, then vowels. Now we are on blends and sight words.
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Old 10-05-2012, 12:10 PM
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We teach our kids here lower case first with the exception of the capital for their first name. The reason being is for reading recognition as well as it being very difficult to unlearn wrong habits so a child that learns to write their name in all caps has to then be taught to write their name all over.
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Old 10-05-2012, 01:05 PM
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So, basically there is no right or wrong way, it's all personal opinion? That's good. Now, no matter how I do it, I can prove it's the right way.

Thanks for the info. I'll look into Zoo phonics and HWoT.
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Old 10-05-2012, 01:08 PM
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I've taught my kids the uppercase first (generally, although there are always lower case letters around, so of course we learn those as well). Uppercase is what children gravitate towards and most of the letters are easier to write.

My kids this year are all four years old and we're moving to lower case. I've found the transition to be pretty easy, I think because I've always exposed them to lowercase as well. By the time they go to kinder next year, they'll be writing both upper and lower and will hopefully have a little bit of an understanding of when to use upper and when to use lower (in regards to their name, that is).
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Old 10-06-2012, 09:51 AM
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I've always started with uppercase with 2 year olds and as they approach 4, the more advanced kids have started lowercase. I've also done some Handwriting Without Tears methods, but for 2-3 year olds you have to figure out what works best for that particular group. Different strokes for different folks
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Old 10-06-2012, 01:27 PM
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Thanks everyone. I'm going to try to talk to the lady who runs the daycare program for our public schools here. I think I'll do it the way the school system does it, then we will all be on the same page. I'm just glad to know that there isn't one right or one wrong way.
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Old 10-06-2012, 03:23 PM
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I've always remembered doing them both together.

A great book to help reinforce learning both together in a fun way is the ABC book.
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Old 10-06-2012, 06:14 PM
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I would say both. I didn't know any better and taught my oldest to write his name all capitals. ooopsie! Kindergarten Teacher and I had to teach him all over again.

Since working with Pre-K children I found that many first time parents teach their children to write their name all capitals like I did - if they teach them anything at all.

To be honest, I'd rather have a child enter Pre-K at least knowing how to write their first name any way than not at all.

If you are their first Teacher with this, the best is to star with their names.

This is a great place for making Tracing Pages: http://www.kidzone.ws/tracers/none/tracer-form.asp
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Old 10-06-2012, 08:54 PM
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I am the first teacher. I got through a and b when Mom asked if I would do her name first. So, we will start that this week. Love the Tracer Page. Thank you!
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Old 10-06-2012, 09:38 PM
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I do their name first (in both), and then work on uppercase letters when writing first. Recognition and reading wise, we work on both.


First, teach the letters of their first name

Second, teach the letters that do not require curve or angles
E, F, H, I, L, T

Third, teach angles
A, K, M, N, V, W, X, Y, Z

Next, teach curves
C, O ,S, U

Last, teach combinations
B, D, G, J, P, Q, R
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Old 10-07-2012, 12:55 AM
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When I first started daycare, I started with all uppercase letters, then went through all the lowercase. It worked out great because my kids were all around 2 years old or younger. Now I do both at the same time, including writing and phonics of each letter simultaneously. In an effort to keep the children refreshed on what we've already learned, I do games once or twice a week involving the entire alphabet (both upper and lower). These games are pretty slow-going right now, but I hope that by the time we get to Z, the kids will know everything decently. I do have problems with the children mixing up the usual culprits: W/w/M/m; G/C/c; P/p/q/d/b/h; N/Z/z; E/F; I/T/H; V/v/Y/y; n/U/u and J/j/I/i.

I hope this doesn't side-track this post too much, but does anyone have suggestions for clearing up the confusion on these letters? I especially have a hard time with the P/p/q/d/b/h letters.
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Old 10-07-2012, 07:21 AM
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I don't think my primary teachers ever solved that problem Spud. I'm 59 years old, and I still have to pause a second when I write a lower case b or d. I've mastered the lower case p though.
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