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  #1  
Old 08-10-2016, 04:20 PM
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Default Adhering to Documented Food Allergy...When Mom Doesn't

Child with a bunch of allergies. Easy enough to accomodate/available substitutes so I offered to provide meals for a slightly higher daily rate, mom preferred this to packing.

It is documented with the pediatrician based on moms food logs, the child was too young to test.

Anyway, Mom let it slip that she gives child known allergens. There ARE obvious (mild-moderate) symptoms when the child is exposed to 2 of the 4 things listed.

Mom is known to give ALL things listed. She is not careful when they eat out, and I have had to point out several things that PROBABLY contain allergens (check every label, duh.)

WWYD here? I get paid enough to compensate continuing and I sub it for all children so it's easy enough. Ask for the allergy tests? Stop providing? ugh.
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Old 08-10-2016, 04:25 PM
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That is frustrating.

You know for sure that she is intentionally giving her child allergens? Or did she let it slip that she mistakenly gave allergens and "this is what happened"?

How do you know how she eats out/what she orders for child?

Since you have contracted with the mom to pay a higher rate for food allergens to be avoided, you should definitely continue to do your part. It can only be beneficial to the child.
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Old 08-10-2016, 06:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daycarediva View Post
Child with a bunch of allergies. Easy enough to accomodate/available substitutes so I offered to provide meals for a slightly higher daily rate, mom preferred this to packing.

It is documented with the pediatrician based on moms food logs, the child was too young to test.

Anyway, Mom let it slip that she gives child known allergens. There ARE obvious (mild-moderate) symptoms when the child is exposed to 2 of the 4 things listed.

Mom is known to give ALL things listed. She is not careful when they eat out, and I have had to point out several things that PROBABLY contain allergens (check every label, duh.)

WWYD here? I get paid enough to compensate continuing and I sub it for all children so it's easy enough. Ask for the allergy tests? Stop providing? ugh.

I worry about your liability.
I'd document and insist mom sign off (admitting her lack of adherence to restrictions) and continue what you're doing.
Poor kid
As long as the side effects aren't serious or life threatening I doubt its something worth reporting.
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Old 08-10-2016, 06:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
I worry about your liability.
I'd document and insist mom sign off (admitting her lack of adherence to restrictions) and continue what you're doing.
Poor kid
As long as the side effects aren't serious or life threatening I doubt its something worth reporting.
This. 100% Or log meals. Been there . . .
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Old 08-10-2016, 07:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
I worry about your liability.
I'd document and insist mom sign off (admitting her lack of adherence to restrictions) and continue what you're doing.
Poor kid
As long as the side effects aren't serious or life threatening I doubt its something worth reporting.
This X10. Take care of your part and go from there
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Old 08-11-2016, 08:59 AM
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I would ask for child to be retested.Then insist on Dr. note of known allergies.If child has a serious reaction to something mom allows she could blame you.
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Old 08-11-2016, 10:03 AM
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I know I've told this story multiple times on here lol but it was so ridiculous so here I go again. I had a girl in our program where I worked and the girl was supposed to be allergic to peanuts so all year we had adjusted our snack purchases (I was the director and lead teacher so I did the planning, shopping, prepping, serving, cleaning, you name it). The snack budget was higher and took more time, but of course we did it. Then one time she ate another child's lunch item and I freaked out even though she was perfectly fine and we called the mom and mom didn't come or worry or anything.... Hm that was my first hint at suspicious allergy nonsense. But we kept on with the nut free life at school and of course nothing could come from a 'plant that processes peanuts' etc. Then at the very end of the school year, it was her birthday and mom brought a Von's cake. An actual standard grocery store bakery Von's cake. Ha. Ridiculous. In that job, a private school trying to get the littles in at 3, 4 and 5 years old to feed into the kindergarten, I would never even think to complain about that to the headmaster. If I were there now, I would probably have mom give me drs record of allergies (which obviously wouldn't exist)!

The mom from the OP sounds like she didn't actually ever test but the dr agreed there were allergies based on mom's observations. I wonder if mom is sort of blasé about it because it was never really confirmed with testing (though it seems clear to her when she sees the allergic reactions!?).. hm strange situation!
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Old 08-11-2016, 12:08 PM
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I'd continue making meals that are safe for the child to eat.
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Old 08-11-2016, 07:04 PM
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Food allergies are one of the reasons I have DD at home with me. She has severe reactions to a bunch of foods. Here's my take:
First of all, I would want the child to be seen by a board certified pediatric allergist. Even an ENT isn't knowledgeable enough imo.

Second, you need some meds with instructions from allergist. When DD has a mild reaction, we give her Zyrtec, but Benedryl is the most common.

An allergist can tell the parent if the child should be carrying an epipen.

And btw, the tests aren't 100% accurate. By themselves the skin prick test or the blood test are about 50% accurate. Combined, they are about 70% accurate. The child's reactions are the most accurate way to tell if a child has a food allergy
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Old 08-11-2016, 09:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom2Two View Post
Food allergies are one of the reasons I have DD at home with me. She has severe reactions to a bunch of foods. Here's my take:
First of all, I would want the child to be seen by a board certified pediatric allergist. Even an ENT isn't knowledgeable enough imo.

Second, you need some meds with instructions from allergist. When DD has a mild reaction, we give her Zyrtec, but Benedryl is the most common.

An allergist can tell the parent if the child should be carrying an epipen.

And btw, the tests aren't 100% accurate. By themselves the skin prick test or the blood test are about 50% accurate. Combined, they are about 70% accurate. The child's reactions are the most accurate way to tell if a child has a food allergy
Something else I had a doctor tell me is if the poop stinks real bad or it constipates the child it could be an allergy reaction; I have written documentation from a previous child of 20 food allergies, now baby brother in care... yep, her known allergins a possibility for him (just starting solids a month ago)... so far bananas are causing issues just like with her, but he can tolerate avocado, sweet potatoes and lentils - go figure, just like big sis (he is still EBF as main food); mom wanted to try carrots, but it's one of the known allergins for older child. What I have been told is that allergy tests don't really come into play until a child is 2 years old... that is unless severe reaction; they really can't test before 24 months
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Old 08-12-2016, 07:04 AM
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Have this here right now also.
Child has very mild reactions to allergens. I stopped providing meals except for breakfast, which is easy enough to track. Mom packs lunch daily during school days off, mostly consists of lunchables, which contain Capri Sun which contain fruits child supposedly can't have. Funny thing is, when I gave child a capri sun, which I made sure had no ingredients she could not have, mom freaked and swore spot on her face was a reaction coming. I just laughed to myself and asked mom if she realized the drinks she sent with her everyday contained supposed allergies. The child was fine, but from that point on she only gets water or what mom sends.
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Old 08-12-2016, 09:55 AM
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I had a conference with the parents. I recommended that we re-start a new food log. Sometimes she has reactions on her in the morning (mild-moderate reactions, only 1 thing requires benadryl which she has a dr order for and we are all careful around that item)

Parents agreed. Mom sheepishly admitted that she feels bad for dcg and gives in, because the reaction/s are mild she said it doesn't seem to be a big deal on occassion. She understood my perspective, how serious I took it, and how much it affects MY life (the added label checking, substitutions in recipes, planning, etc)

Then I recommended that she get a referral for an allergist. They have a note from their pediatrician, who only required a food log/documentation from mom to "prove" allergies. According to my own research, child should be old enough to test now.

Parents were hesitant. They finally said they don't WANT dcg to get tested because it will be painful for her. Scratch tests aren't the worst thing in the world, and the child is crazy sensitive/dramatic to the extreme over ANY injury no matter how slight. I said we need to get a new food log and eliminate the other possible allergens, then perhaps they would only test for the one allergy.

They were more receptive after that. We are doing the food log for one month, they are contacting the pediatrician.
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  #13  
Old 08-14-2016, 11:12 AM
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Some parents are clueless.

I had a child with a corn allergy and (sorry tmi) she would have very distinctive BMs when she'd eaten something containing corn. After weeks of blistering diarrhea, I asked her mom what was she eating at home (little one was super picky so this wasn't as weird a question as it seemed). Mom started off with cereal...I knew immediately and asked what kinds...Froot Loops, Fruity Pebbles, etc. ALL corn-based. She truly did not understand that corn allergy meant anything containing corn...she thought it just meant actual corn.
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