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Old 09-17-2016, 11:18 AM
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Default The Kid You Have To Touch

So I've got my new crop of kiddos, and I got one who is known for behavioral issues. He doesn't have any diagnoses or issues that I can see. He just is the quintessential class clown. His goal in life is to have the other kids laugh at him as much as possible.

Hes quite bright, very good at fine motor activities and can independently do most tasks. He has trouble with group activities because he constantly has the urge to be silly and get the attention on him. I do "one and done" with him and its helped a lot.

What I've noticed is that he does not respond or listen to his name or instructions if I just say them normally or even in a raised voice. Even "A, STOP!" gets no acknowledgement. I have to go to him, literally stop his body with my hands and speak directly into his face. I dint think there's a hearing issue, because he hears just fine with friends, but I can't rule it out.

The issue is, we have a "hands-off" discipline policy. But words dont reach him unless accompanied by touch. I never touch him roughly, I either hold his shoulders or take his hand. Its like the touch redirects his attention. But Im afraid the admins may say something.

Has anyone had experience with a child like this.
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Old 09-17-2016, 12:10 PM
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I have, with kiddos on the spectrum and with ones who have discovered the power of "selective hearing." (Usually older pre-k for choosing not to hear you) In your situation, I would get down at eye level instead of placing your hands on him. It's equally effective for ensuring that the message was received.
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Old 09-17-2016, 02:36 PM
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I have had success with getting down on their level, and asking them to meet my eyes. I have one now at 16 months who understands this. I explain, even at a very young age, that I want to see their eyes, so I can see that they are listening to me. They may not always do as asked, but my 16 month old very rarely needs to verbally be told no anymore. I can usually say her name and she will meet my eyes, and understand that what she is doing is not acceptable.
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Old 09-17-2016, 07:00 PM
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Yes, I've had luck with getting down on their level and telling them to stop what they're doing and look at me. Often the words are quite firm, "You need to stop and look at me". I currently have two like this. One child I've had for two years, so he's older and has gotten so much better. Another child just started with me and I do still often need a more hands on approach, which I hate doing. Sometimes just putting my hands gently on whatever toy he's using so that he's not playing with it anymore helps too.
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Old 09-19-2016, 12:49 PM
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Could he have a processing issue?

My only children I've run across like this had a hearing problem, that wasn't found during his 4yo check up but was 6 months later when Mom felt like something was going on, and one with an auditory processing disorder. Might be something to google more to see?
http://www.medicinenet.com/auditory_...en/article.htm
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Old 09-20-2016, 05:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kendallina View Post
Yes, I've had luck with getting down on their level and telling them to stop what they're doing and look at me. Often the words are quite firm, "You need to stop and look at me". I currently have two like this. One child I've had for two years, so he's older and has gotten so much better. Another child just started with me and I do still often need a more hands on approach, which I hate doing. Sometimes just putting my hands gently on whatever toy he's using so that he's not playing with it anymore helps too.
How old is he and what do you want him to be doing instead of playing with the toy?
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