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  #1  
Old 08-02-2012, 10:44 PM
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Default Montessori Anyone?

I've been experimenting with Montessori trays for the daycare kids. So far they have been very popular... some more than others. For instance the sorting trays are a big hit!

I think running a Montessori program would be a good selling feature for acquiring respectful families as opposed to opportunists looking for the best deal and trying to rip you off every chance they get. I'm not calling my daycare a Montessori because I'm not sure what qualifications are required, but I would like to say that I have many features of a Montessori program.

Does anyone here run a Montessori program?
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Old 08-03-2012, 05:31 AM
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"Montessori" is not a trademark name or anything like that and so can be used by anyone. However, that's a big problem for true Montessorians. Since there are no qualifications required to call yourself Montessori, anyone can even people who THINK they're doing Montessori or people who KNOW they aren't but still want to use the term to get more interest.

I have many Montessori elements in my program but am not a purist by any means, it's pretty much impossible to recreate the Montessori environment in a small group setting and with WILDLY different ages.

I call my program a "Montessori inspired home daycare" that way I'm not claiming to be totally all Montessori, but I do appeal to people who know something about it. And it makes sense then why I never use high chairs, rarely use bouncers, swings, etc. and why all my upstairs toys are wooden and kids all help prepare and clean up meals.
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Old 08-03-2012, 05:32 AM
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I would love to go in one day and see what they do all day. I have some things that are mont. and I found that the locks (lock and key and you need to try to open them easy dollar store find) is a really really big hit. The problem being is that most of my kids are under the age of 2, so I'm not sure what to do with them. To take the course is 5000 dollars, and clearly I don't have it.
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Old 08-03-2012, 05:40 AM
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You can learn a TON about Montessori on Youtube, I've spent hours upon hours, I can't believe how much info and ideas are available on Youtube for Mont. Just start searching and you'll be so surprised, you'll learn more than you can possibly handle and get tons and tons of ideas, even for the under 2year olds.
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Old 08-03-2012, 06:11 AM
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Originally Posted by glenechogirl View Post
You can learn a TON about Montessori on Youtube, I've spent hours upon hours, I can't believe how much info and ideas are available on Youtube for Mont. Just start searching and you'll be so surprised, you'll learn more than you can possibly handle and get tons and tons of ideas, even for the under 2year olds.
I never thought of youtube.
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Old 08-03-2012, 06:29 AM
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I do a lot of Montessori inspired activities. My program is not "totally" the Montessori way. I love it!

There is a lot of FREE Montessori information on the internet (You Tube, blogs, websites, etc.) And you can improvise (read buy or create your own) a lot of the costly Montessori items.
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Old 08-03-2012, 07:40 AM
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I always say I am "play based incorporating aspects of Montessori, Waldorf, and Reggio Emilia."

I try not to get too hung up on labels or claiming to be something I'm not.
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Old 08-03-2012, 07:42 AM
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My daycare is Montessori inspired. I'll be working towards official certification within the next year or so.

As of now I don't have a lot of the more child friendly furniture and fixtures, but that's in the works. I do keep my daycare environment very minimalist. Everything is very organized so each child can focus and move from work station/task to another without a lot of visual or physical clutter. I offer opportunities for each child to do their "work" individually, one on one with me, and with each other daily. We focus on learning through play and sensory awareness, developing self help skills and there is a big emphasis on experiencing and learning in and around nature.



For several years I nannied for a pair of doctors who sent their three kids to Montessori preschool and was straight SHOCKED at the differences between what they were able to learn, their overall demeanor and how they were able to express themselves compared to other kids their age. They had so much more self control, fantastic vocabularies, phenomenal imaginations.....I knew it was something I was going to do for my kids one day and when I started doing daycare it was a definite inspiration for me as a provider. I plan to go all in once we build our addition.
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Old 08-03-2012, 08:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glenechogirl View Post
"Montessori" is not a trademark name or anything like that and so can be used by anyone. However, that's a big problem for true Montessorians. Since there are no qualifications required to call yourself Montessori, anyone can even people who THINK they're doing Montessori or people who KNOW they aren't but still want to use the term to get more interest.

I have many Montessori elements in my program but am not a purist by any means, it's pretty much impossible to recreate the Montessori environment in a small group setting and with WILDLY different ages.

I call my program a "Montessori inspired home daycare" that way I'm not claiming to be totally all Montessori, but I do appeal to people who know something about it. And it makes sense then why I never use high chairs, rarely use bouncers, swings, etc. and why all my upstairs toys are wooden and kids all help prepare and clean up meals.
I do a VERY Montessori-inspried programas well. I LOVE the theory and approach to teaching.

I am curious though, why you feel it would be impossible to recreate the environment? I ONLY take children that fall into the two early age categories (birth to 3 and 3-6).

I am just beginning the certification process and super excited about it!!

Luckily for me, my DH is a wood worker by trade and makes almost all of my toys and materials.
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Old 08-03-2012, 08:31 AM
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I am curious though, why you feel it would be impossible to recreate the environment? I ONLY take children that fall into the two early age categories (birth to 3 and 3-6).

.
A typical traditional Montessori classroom would have 30+ children with ages spanning 0-teens, all under the premise the youngers can gain insight and learn valuable skills from being in the same vicinity as the olders.

It's not a hard and fast concept, but it is the ideal as far as I'm aware.
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Old 08-03-2012, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Willow View Post
A typical traditional Montessori classroom would have 30+ children with ages spanning 0-teens, all under the premise the youngers can gain insight and learn valuable skills from being in the same vicinity as the olders.

It's not a hard and fast concept, but it is the ideal as far as I'm aware.
As far as I'm aware, traditional Montessori has separate classrooms for birth-3, 3-6, 6-9, 9-12, etc. They just stay in the same room with the same teacher for three years. There are, however, separate classrooms to address the very different needs of different ages.
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Old 08-03-2012, 08:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Willow View Post
A typical traditional Montessori classroom would have 30+ children with ages spanning 0-teens, all under the premise the youngers can gain insight and learn valuable skills from being in the same vicinity as the olders.

It's not a hard and fast concept, but it is the ideal as far as I'm aware.
I am sure there may be classrooms like that but a typical Montessori classroom does have mixed age groups but they are still usually divided into groups such as birth to pre-primary, primary or elementary, and upper elementary.

The ages over-lap a bit but as far as what I am being taught now the teachers are certified in one maybe two age groups to cover the over lap in development but the certification process stops at age 12.

The older kids are valuable insight to the younger ones but according to my instructor, you will rarely see teens or secondary students in a classroom with primary or pre-primary aged kids.
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  #13  
Old 08-03-2012, 08:52 AM
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Originally Posted by SilverSabre25 View Post
As far as I'm aware, traditional Montessori has separate classrooms for birth-3, 3-6, 6-9, 9-12, etc. They just stay in the same room with the same teacher for three years. There are, however, separate classrooms to address the very different needs of different ages.
I am not disagreeing with you, only pointed out that that may be what glenechogirl was referring to when she said it was an impossible environment to recreate to the ideal in just a typical home daycare set up.
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  #14  
Old 08-03-2012, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
I do a VERY Montessori-inspried programas well. I LOVE the theory and approach to teaching.

I am curious though, why you feel it would be impossible to recreate the environment? I ONLY take children that fall into the two early age categories (birth to 3 and 3-6).

I am just beginning the certification process and super excited about it!!

Luckily for me, my DH is a wood worker by trade and makes almost all of my toys and materials.
I believe, and many Montessorians believe, that it is impossible to exactly duplicate the Montessori Children's House environment in a home because

1. Much of the philosophy has to do with social learning, bigs teach littles how to do things, littles see bigs putting toys away, demonstrating works, etc. I only have 6 children in my daycare, so not enough to truly have the large children's community feeling. 12 would be bettr, but still not the same as a Mont. class that typically has 20-30.

2. Mont. classrooms operate with a 3 "teacher" system. One is solely on demonstrating works to children, she moves around the room showing kids proper procedure for works. Another teacher is solely a manager, helping kids put toys away, cleaning up, prepping lunch, etc. The 3rd is the mediator, I think, hard to remember now. I think the 3rd helps facilitate apologies, distracted behavior, anticipate and redirect. In the home setting, I work alone, I have to do it all by myself and so my attention is very divided, if you have an assistant it would be much better.

3. For me, maybe not you, but I currently have ages 6months-5 years. The toddling/crawling babies make it almost impossible for me to put out challenging trays for the toddlers. I don't have the space or eyes to watch seperate groups, nor would I want to because I love how the bigs are compassionate and play with the babies.
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Old 08-03-2012, 09:40 AM
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You're right Blackcat, Mont. seperates ages 0-3, 3-6, 6-9, and 9-12. I think it's terrific you're working on your cert and it sounds like you can get VERY close to the Mont. environment! I didn't mean to be a party pooper and say you can't do Mont. at home, you CAN get very very close and in some ways better! Many Mont. schools don't even have 0-3 because originally Maria Montessori expected babies that young to be home with mothers learning at their feet in their own environment. Today though with so many working parents infant/toddler Mont is being offered and that's great too.
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Old 08-03-2012, 09:44 AM
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Originally Posted by glenechogirl View Post
I believe, and many Montessorians believe, that it is impossible to exactly duplicate the Montessori Children's House environment in a home because

1. Much of the philosophy has to do with social learning, bigs teach littles how to do things, littles see bigs putting toys away, demonstrating works, etc. I only have 6 children in my daycare, so not enough to truly have the large children's community feeling. 12 would be bettr, but still not the same as a Mont. class that typically has 20-30.

2. Mont. classrooms operate with a 3 "teacher" system. One is solely on demonstrating works to children, she moves around the room showing kids proper procedure for works. Another teacher is solely a manager, helping kids put toys away, cleaning up, prepping lunch, etc. The 3rd is the mediator, I think, hard to remember now. I think the 3rd helps facilitate apologies, distracted behavior, anticipate and redirect. In the home setting, I work alone, I have to do it all by myself and so my attention is very divided, if you have an assistant it would be much better.

3. For me, maybe not you, but I currently have ages 6months-5 years. The toddling/crawling babies make it almost impossible for me to put out challenging trays for the toddlers. I don't have the space or eyes to watch seperate groups, nor would I want to because I love how the bigs are compassionate and play with the babies.
Oh ok, gotta ya! Yes, that makes a lot of sense.

I do have 12 and I also have the space too so my 0-3's and my 3-6's have separate areas so I can put out trays and materials that the littles don't have access too.

My under 1's are completely separate so they have space all their own, which I love, but feel defeats the purpose as I want them to learn from the older ones but because of safety, it just isn't always possible.

Another thing I am missing is the 3 teacher concept as I only have myself too and a morning/lunch helper. I would really LOVE to go all out though and have the "ideal" set up. But for now, it is only a future dream.
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Old 08-03-2012, 09:49 AM
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Originally Posted by glenechogirl View Post
You're right Blackcat, Mont. seperates ages 0-3, 3-6, 6-9, and 9-12. I think it's terrific you're working on your cert and it sounds like you can get VERY close to the Mont. environment! I didn't mean to be a party pooper and say you can't do Mont. at home, you CAN get very very close and in some ways better! Many Mont. schools don't even have 0-3 because originally Maria Montessori expected babies that young to be home with mothers learning at their feet in their own environment. Today though with so many working parents infant/toddler Mont is being offered and that's great too.
Oh, I didn't take your post as a "party-pooper" post at all! I was just super interested in other people's takes on Montessori. It is truly fascinating and has some excellent learning ideals and methods that are great, just not always possible in today environments.

I think that many of the early approaches that we are taught in school were designed around the concept that preschool learning meant kids 3 and up and like you said, babies were home being raised by their mothers and never in need of "schooling".

I think that we, as a society, definitely have to change and adapt to the things that change in our current surroundings and simply do the closest thing we can according to what we believe.
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Old 08-03-2012, 11:45 AM
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I'm wondering about this. I know one Montesori technique is the mat or tray system, where each child take out a toy (I know...their "work" not play), and uses it on their mat or tray, then returns it.

Space is such an issue for me, but I have a little guy who is not a strong player (and he'll be 3 next month). He spends a lot of time floating around, grabbing other children's things, but then drops it and moves on. He rarely uses toys appropriately.

I'm wondering if the mat thing could help him and the others as well? But then, how do you incorporate things like art supplies, dramatic play, and other things that can't be kept in a defined space? Or, do you set aside a scheduled time for such activities?

Also...I know Montessori is a lot about life skills. I was thinking about buying one of those non-electric rug/floor sweeper things they use in restaurants. Do you think the kids could work it? Do those things actually pick up anything?
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Old 08-03-2012, 11:55 AM
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I'm wondering about this. I know one Montesori technique is the mat or tray system, where each child take out a toy (I know...their "work" not play), and uses it on their mat or tray, then returns it.

Space is such an issue for me, but I have a little guy who is not a strong player (and he'll be 3 next month). He spends a lot of time floating around, grabbing other children's things, but then drops it and moves on. He rarely uses toys appropriately.

I'm wondering if the mat thing could help him and the others as well? But then, how do you incorporate things like art supplies, dramatic play, and other things that can't be kept in a defined space? Or, do you set aside a scheduled time for such activities?

Also...I know Montessori is a lot about life skills. I was thinking about buying one of those non-electric rug/floor sweeper things they use in restaurants. Do you think the kids could work it? Do those things actually pick up anything?
I have one of those floor sweepers...I got it at a yard sale. I cut the handle down, and the kids walk all ove rthe house with it.
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Old 08-03-2012, 12:07 PM
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well I show them what life skills are, like today---we are leaving for our trip later today so I was cleaning the house (I hate coming home and then having to clean) well I was cleaning the toilets and dcg asked me what I was doing, so I told her that I had to clean the toilets, I asked her if her mom cleans the toilet and she says "no" I then remembered that they have a maid that comes in and does things. I let my dck's help me with all the basic life skills, but how do you stop them from fighting when it comes to loading and unloading the dishwasher they all want to help.
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Old 08-03-2012, 12:14 PM
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well I show them what life skills are, like today---we are leaving for our trip later today so I was cleaning the house (I hate coming home and then having to clean) well I was cleaning the toilets and dcg asked me what I was doing, so I told her that I had to clean the toilets, I asked her if her mom cleans the toilet and she says "no" I then remembered that they have a maid that comes in and does things. I let my dck's help me with all the basic life skills, but how do you stop them from fighting when it comes to loading and unloading the dishwasher they all want to help.
lol...same system here today. Leaving for the weekend, hate comming back to a dirty house. Everyone (including 9 yo) was sooooo tired this morning, so, for once I turned on the tv, gave them all their blankets, closed the curtains, and they watched a half hour of the Smurfs while I scrubbed the bathroom and ran the vacuum through the downstairs.

I can never do the downstairs (family room, and our master suite), because either the kids are upstairs (and I can't here them), or they are sleeping downstairs, so I can't get in there then either. Last thing I want to do on weekends or evenings is clean more. So, once every week or two (usually 1.5...lol), I take them downstairs, and then they "help" me clean, or they get to play with a few different toys while I do it.
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Old 08-03-2012, 03:54 PM
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I do a VERY Montessori-inspried programas well. I LOVE the theory and approach to teaching.

I am curious though, why you feel it would be impossible to recreate the environment? I ONLY take children that fall into the two early age categories (birth to 3 and 3-6).

I am just beginning the certification process and super excited about it!!

Luckily for me, my DH is a wood worker by trade and makes almost all of my toys and materials.
Hey! I wrote back to u did u get my pm? I think I may have sent it more then once because I didn't thhink it went through,

But any way which Montessori program are u getting certified through?
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Old 08-03-2012, 04:22 PM
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Hey! I wrote back to u did u get my pm? I think I may have sent it more then once because I didn't thhink it went through,

But any way which Montessori program are u getting certified through?
I did, but I thought I replied back.....maybe not.. sorry.

I am doing certification through the NAMC North American Montessori Center. http://www.montessoritraining.net/pr...troduction.htm

It is on-line so that is super nice since the only other options in my area are at least 3-4 hours away. The set up the NAMC has is fantastic and really works for people who can't take time to attend an on-site classroom on a regular basis.
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Old 08-03-2012, 05:48 PM
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I love Montessori.

This sounds crazy, but recently my children have been taking their "SPOTS" (toddler prefolds dyed pretty colors) and making them their "tables." Their name, very clever. No one can bother their "table." It is theirs and theirs alone to work on. They just put it on the floor. Works great. Eventually, it would be nice to get little rugs/fabric pieces that are a little larger. But, even the new 2-year-olds understand not to touch other people's work.
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Old 08-03-2012, 09:01 PM
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I love Montessori.

This sounds crazy, but recently my children have been taking their "SPOTS" (toddler prefolds dyed pretty colors) and making them their "tables." Their name, very clever. No one can bother their "table." It is theirs and theirs alone to work on. They just put it on the floor. Works great. Eventually, it would be nice to get little rugs/fabric pieces that are a little larger. But, even the new 2-year-olds understand not to touch other people's work.
Lol that's so funny to use prefolds! they know what has been on there so it's like their own territory!

Blackcat let me know how the online class work! I have been looking into that , don't have the time right now but would love to take that course eventually as well! Are u doing the 3-6?
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Old 08-04-2012, 02:32 PM
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Does anyone know if they have something in Ontario that isnt expensive
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Old 08-04-2012, 04:33 PM
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I looked at a lot.of the videos online, and they all seemed a little cold in their manner of instructing the children. But I do like and agree with most of their philosophy.

I always had elements of Montessori in my classroom - opting for materials rather than toys, a mixed-age group, having chores. I've been trying to figure out for years how to get my current group to play more meaningfully - they do a lot of house/mommy-and-baby scenarios and superhero/monster play, and they like to play in one big mob. I would like to introduce some more Montessori-inspired elements into my program in September, but everything is so chaotic right now and Im not going to be there very much longer anyway.

I do however plan to pull a great deal from it when my own daycare opens. One thing i didn't see much about is how to deal if the children dont seem to be catching on or are uncooperative or show behavior problems.
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Old 08-05-2012, 06:04 PM
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Sorry to keep pestering the Montessori thread

There are no words to tell how much I love this

http://www.flickr.com/photos/3806060...7622778099935/

I've followed her blog for about a year, but I've just found this...mesmorized. I can't wait to make some of this stuff. Aside from dolls, blocks, Little People, etc...I don't plan to have many "toys" in my daycare. From my experience, they cause kids to be territorial, they're rarely gender-neutral and most of them these days have lights, sounds, screens etc -which I hate.
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Old 08-05-2012, 06:18 PM
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OMG thanks for sharing!!! So many pics I could be looking for hours!!! So many ideas!!! I want to go shopping now! Here's another amazing blog full of ideas and inspiring pics:
http://howwemontessori.typepad.com/
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Old 08-06-2012, 07:19 AM
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Lol that's so funny to use prefolds! they know what has been on there so it's like their own territory!

Blackcat let me know how the online class work! I have been looking into that , don't have the time right now but would love to take that course eventually as well! Are u doing the 3-6?
WHAT are pre-folds? Diapers?
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Old 08-06-2012, 07:27 AM
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OMG thanks for sharing!!! So many pics I could be looking for hours!!! So many ideas!!! I want to go shopping now! Here's another amazing blog full of ideas and inspiring pics:
http://howwemontessori.typepad.com/

Man, the first thing I saw on this one was that Otis sleeps wherever and whenever he wants! HOLY CR**

Magda Gerber advocated a similar approach, and I respect that it might work for some people, but not in a MILLION,TRILLION years would I ever do it, try it, or even think about trying it. Luckily, I don't have babies of my own, so I guess I can stop being all shocked.
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Old 08-06-2012, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Heidi View Post
Man, the first thing I saw on this one was that Otis sleeps wherever and whenever he wants! HOLY CR**

Magda Gerber advocated a similar approach, and I respect that it might work for some people, but not in a MILLION,TRILLION years would I ever do it, try it, or even think about trying it. Luckily, I don't have babies of my own, so I guess I can stop being all shocked.
I saw that too but I assumed the blog was about how we Montessori AT HOME....not daycare.

Heck, could you imagine how easy (hard?) daycare would be if we just let the kiddos all lay down and sleep anywhere and at anytime they wanted?!?! Or eat whenever, where ever and run amok?!?!

....a whole new meaning to Montessori!!
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Old 08-06-2012, 10:14 AM
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There is actually a montessori school where we do our observations, and beleive it or not the baby beds are on the floor in these really cute little beds. They crawl to bed or get put in there when they fall asleep. I think i Have some pics I will try to upload it so you can see.

I have my son sleep like this as well since he was about 10 months and its not so bad. More children get hurt crawling out of their crib and falling on the floor. For my daycare I like the pack n plays becase its just me here and i wouldnt want the kids wandering around the room, but if they are all one age and you have enough help then its pretty cool, if a montessori environment is what you want.
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Old 08-06-2012, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Sprouts View Post
There is actually a montessori school where we do our observations, and beleive it or not the baby beds are on the floor in these really cute little beds. They crawl to bed or get put in there when they fall asleep. I think i Have some pics I will try to upload it so you can see.

I have my son sleep like this as well since he was about 10 months and its not so bad. More children get hurt crawling out of their crib and falling on the floor. For my daycare I like the pack n plays becase its just me here and i wouldnt want the kids wandering around the room, but if they are all one age and you have enough help then its pretty cool, if a montessori environment is what you want.
THAT is what I want to achieve someday!! That kind of environment!!

My dream is actually to get Montessori certification and open an affordable Montessori school/daycare in my area.
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Old 04-24-2015, 10:51 AM
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I know this is a very old thread, but I was wondering if anyone has had any success with implementing Montessori principles into their home daycare.

I am currently working as a public school teacher in NC. I would like to open up an in home daycare in the 2016-2017 school year and use a Montessori approach. I am not looking to get Montessori certified. I already hold both NY (prek-6) and NC (k-5) teaching licenses as well as a master's degree and a National Board Certification in Literacy. I may pick up the birth - k add on for my NC license because it's only a matter of taking a test. But I would love to implement a lot of the Montessori principles. I like what Echomom said about being a "Montessori inspired home daycare." Ideally, I would like to offer affordable Montessori inspired daycare for teachers. But being that I'll probably be paying my grad. school loan for the rest of my life I can't afford to be paying for another full certification in anything.

I've been looking for a workshop or a highly recommended and practical book but I can't find anything.
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Old 04-24-2015, 11:39 AM
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I would love to go in one day and see what they do all day. I have some things that are mont. and I found that the locks (lock and key and you need to try to open them easy dollar store find) is a really really big hit. The problem being is that most of my kids are under the age of 2, so I'm not sure what to do with them. To take the course is 5000 dollars, and clearly I don't have it.
Just read an old thread lol - I'm bad

I run under 2's only also... I am set up similar to the Montessori NIDO (known as a nest)... Most people know Montessori Preschools; My home is for infants, no swings, no highchairs (I do have seats at the table for 4 babes), many of my toys are handmade and wood, I also have board books that start the kids learning abut Art ( Little Masters), we do music etc, just all geared to babies, No TV, just soft music thruout the day. And yes, I even have floor beds for the older ones (crawling age & up).
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Old 04-28-2018, 12:18 PM
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I think a Montessori school is great for young children. Not all children learn the same and they offer a wide variety of learning techniques.

Last edited by Michael; 04-28-2018 at 02:17 PM.
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Old 08-08-2018, 12:49 AM
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Montessori is great if you really want your child to excel in learning. They offer different learning techniques that will enhance the skills of your child.
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