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  #1  
Old 09-11-2019, 02:20 PM
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Default The Kid That Constantly Riles Up The Other Kids

How on earth do you stop this behavior? It goes on all day. I provide time outdoors where running and being loud and fun is a-ok! I do not permit horsing around or running indoors ever. I have put this child that riles incessantly in time out or alone to do quiet activities but it never stops and it's driving me nuts. Do any of you ladies have this going on at all? How do I stop this? Thanks!!
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Old 09-11-2019, 02:32 PM
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I find a way to say yes. I know, it sounds crazy.

If he wants to run, I set up an outdoor track (with cones) and have him run laps.

If he wants to be loud, I send him outside with woodwinds, drums or have him march cadence (think marching band).

If he wants to throw, I send him outside for cornhole and basketball.

I find ways to burn the EXTRA energy that suits his current interests.
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Old 09-11-2019, 05:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Cat Herder View Post
I find a way to say yes. I know, it sounds crazy.

If he wants to run, I set up an outdoor track (with cones) and have him run laps.

If he wants to be loud, I send him outside with woodwinds, drums or have him march cadence (think marching band).

If he wants to throw, I send him outside for cornhole and basketball.

I find ways to burn the EXTRA energy that suits his current interests.
Like I said we do go out and she is running, jumping, exploring , yelling but she is only 2 and has to be with me when I am inside. She riles everyone up all day regardless of all her energetic bursts outdoors. Need to calm her down while inside. We have harsh winters and it is coming. Outside time will be less😬
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Old 09-11-2019, 05:45 PM
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Sounds like your program might not be a good fit for her. The child is 2, and you are saying, "I have put this child that riles incessantly in time out or alone to do quiet activities but it never stops and it's driving me nuts." I will defer to the professionals here, but burning off energy is part of being a normal 2 year old. I am sad that she is constantly in time out or alone. Maybe she needs a program that allows more free play than you are able to offer in your group. As a mom, I would be sad to hear that a very active child is being forced to sit in time out.
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:13 PM
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Originally Posted by lblanke View Post
Sounds like your program might not be a good fit for her. The child is 2, and you are saying, "I have put this child that riles incessantly in time out or alone to do quiet activities but it never stops and it's driving me nuts." I will defer to the professionals here, but burning off energy is part of being a normal 2 year old. I am sad that she is constantly in time out or alone. Maybe she needs a program that allows more free play than you are able to offer in your group. As a mom, I would be sad to hear that a very active child is being forced to sit in time out.
Thanks for making me feel like a shitty provider. I thoroughly appreciate your unhelpful input.
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:37 PM
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Default Seriously?!

She’s two. You’re setting her for failure. You need to rethink you’re profession. She needs to be allowed to be two without fear of punishment.
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Old 09-11-2019, 07:08 PM
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She’s two. You’re setting her for failure. You need to rethink you’re profession. She needs to be allowed to be two without fear of punishment.
I definitely agree with this!
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Old 09-11-2019, 07:12 PM
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Some kids are naturally more active then others. One of the things we do is positive visual rules we talk about before breakfast everyday:

We use walking feet inside, we can run when we go outside.

We use quiet voices inside, we can be loud during outside play.

And the when they run, we say we use walking feet, when can you run?

Also we praise those who are doing what they should:

Wow, look how nicely Katie is walking to her seat. I love the way Scotty and Johnny are using inside voices playing with the blocks.

I will also say, it makes me sad when you run inside, that is not safe.

It really hurts my ears when you are loud, can we use an inside voice.
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Old 09-12-2019, 05:11 AM
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She’s two. You’re setting her for failure. You need to rethink you’re profession. She needs to be allowed to be two without fear of punishment.
I'm setting her up for failure? By trying to teach her to be calmer while inside?
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Old 09-12-2019, 05:41 AM
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I see you are from N.Y.I was from Ma. we both have tough winters.I was in a residential area with sidewalks.Every day we went for a walk.We left at 10am right after snack.Anyone over two years held onto the stroller ,The three infants were bundled up .We took a twenty minute walk and I used safety straps each child was "attached" to the stroller.Then weather permitting they ran around the play yard for up to one hour .Then back around the block into the house for lunch.I was lucky to be able to push the stroller into the porch.Same deal in pm after snack and nap.They walked well we sang songs and they enjoyed it.Good luck ...Winter is Coming.
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Old 09-12-2019, 06:05 AM
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Do you have an indoor area large enough for sound and movement?

I have a couple of 20-minute sessions of dance/music in our schedule daily. I give them instruments to play, E-Z steppers for stomping, clapping, limbo, river stones for balance, 4-way tunnels for crawling, etc. per day indoors. (we can't play music for more than 20 minutes at a time because it "limits verbal communication" )

That helps.
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Old 09-12-2019, 06:05 AM
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Originally Posted by rosieteddy View Post
I see you are from N.Y.I was from Ma. we both have tough winters.I was in a residential area with sidewalks.Every day we went for a walk.We left at 10am right after snack.Anyone over two years held onto the stroller ,The three infants were bundled up .We took a twenty minute walk and I used safety straps each child was "attached" to the stroller.Then weather permitting they ran around the play yard for up to one hour .Then back around the block into the house for lunch.I was lucky to be able to push the stroller into the porch.Same deal in pm after snack and nap.They walked well we sang songs and they enjoyed it.Good luck ...Winter is Coming.
I cannot stress enough how much run, yell, jump ect play my kiddos get here. We go out daily, I also have a very large daycare space in my home as well as my basement that is roughly 1600 square feet of play area. This kid no matter what cannot stop. We have to have meal time , snack time, reading them books, craft time without this kid riling up everyone.
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Old 09-12-2019, 06:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Valerie928 View Post
I cannot stress enough how much run, yell, jump ect play my kiddos get here. We go out daily, I also have a very large daycare space in my home as well as my basement that is roughly 1600 square feet of play area. This kid no matter what cannot stop. We have to have meal time , snack time, reading them books, craft time without this kid riling up everyone.
Then you may need to consider letting her go. Clearly she needs something different. It isn't a failure, some kids simply do better in large centers. They just do. I've sent a few there, myself, they thrived.

Introverts do better in small in-home care, extroverts do better in larger centers with larger groups of peers. Some people require so much attention that it is too much for a small group to provide. My bet is you can name a few adults you know like that, they started as kids too.
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Old 09-12-2019, 06:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Cat Herder View Post
Then you may need to consider letting her go. Clearly she needs something different. It isn't a failure, some kids simply do better in large centers. They just do. I've sent a few there, myself, they thrived.

Introverts do better in small in-home care, extroverts do better in larger centers with larger groups of peers. Some people require so much attention that it is too much for a small group to provide. My bet is you can name a few adults you know like that, they started as kids too.
I am starting to think you may be right. She may need something different. I have had her since she was 8 weeks old. I have really enjoyed her but she is just a busy little lady🤪
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Old 09-12-2019, 06:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Valerie928 View Post
I am starting to think you may be right. She may need something different. I have had her since she was 8 weeks old. I have really enjoyed her but she is just a busy little lady��
I had a little fellow the same. Here since birth, but by 3 he was losing his shine. I only keep 6 kids, mixed-age, and he was not being challenged enough. The state rules made it almost impossible for me to give him what he needed and keep the smaller kids. His mom and I both cried, but it was the best for him. The center had tennis instructors, karate instructors, swim instructors, etc. He just had so many opportunities I could not offer. He is extremely athletic, to this day.

His sister thrived here and stayed until kindergarten. She was artsy and a reader. She is an honors student, now.
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Old 09-12-2019, 08:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Valerie928 View Post
Thanks for making me feel like a shitty provider. I thoroughly appreciate your unhelpful input.
This right here ^^ is what bothers me most about this job and this discussion board.

You (the OP) asked for advice.
A poster gave advice...advice I agree with and the only thing that is taken from what she said is that she made you feel like a bad provider?
It's not about you. It's about the child and what's best for her.

The behavior of children in our care is NOT always a direct reflection of the type of provider we are or aren't. The most difficult kids teach us the most and sometimes some kids are simply not the right fit for some programs.

The poster that replied didn't say anything personal about you at all. The post was actually very relevant and was along the lines of what I would have said too.

She wasn't trying to make you feel like a shitty provider.
I am sorry that her post made you feel like that.
Knowing the poster as I do, I am confident that was not her intent at all.

Clearly she was simply saying what you ended up realizing anyways... that your program might not be the best environment for this child.



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Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
She’s two. You’re setting her for failure. You need to rethink you’re profession. She needs to be allowed to be two without fear of punishment.
This (the bolded) however was unnecessary and very unhelpful.

Just because one child doesn't do well in one environment does not mean the provider needs to rethink her entire profession.

That's a huge stretch and a really rude statement to make to someone that is trying to navigate the situation. She didn't post venting about the child, she posted asking for advice on what to do about the situation.

Telling someone else to rethink their profession is childish and immature not to mention just plain rude.
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Old 09-12-2019, 10:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Cat Herder View Post
Then you may need to consider letting her go. Clearly she needs something different. It isn't a failure, some kids simply do better in large centers. They just do. I've sent a few there, myself, they thrived.

Introverts do better in small in-home care, extroverts do better in larger centers with larger groups of peers. Some people require so much attention that it is too much for a small group to provide. My bet is you can name a few adults you know like that, they started as kids too.
This!!!
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Old 09-12-2019, 10:25 AM
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It sounds like it is just not a good fit.

Is she sensory seeking? Can you have her do heavy lifting work, use a lightly weighted blanket, high chair or booster for meals (heck even stories as we can use it for 15 minutes outside of meal times).

I agree that although this may sound like typical 2yo behavior, it sounds like the provider is saying it's in excess- to the point the child cannot participate in the program. Imho- it isn't a failure on your part, just not a good fit. I run a preschool program and all of my 2's (even new ones) can sit for short periods (10-15 minutes for a book, fingerplay, song, and then we get up for a movement activity before they get a 'brain break' for some free play/centers)
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Old 09-12-2019, 10:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
This right here ^^ is what bothers me most about this job and this discussion board.

You (the OP) asked for advice.
A poster gave advice...advice I agree with and the only thing that is taken from what she said is that she made you feel like a bad provider?
It's not about you. It's about the child and what's best for her.

The behavior of children in our care is NOT always a direct reflection of the type of provider we are or aren't. The most difficult kids teach us the most and sometimes some kids are simply not the right fit for some programs.

The poster that replied didn't say anything personal about you at all. The post was actually very relevant and was along the lines of what I would have said too.

She wasn't trying to make you feel like a shitty provider.
I am sorry that her post made you feel like that.
Knowing the poster as I do, I am confident that was not her intent at all.

Clearly she was simply saying what you ended up realizing anyways... that your program might not be the best environment for this child.





This (the bolded) however was unnecessary and very unhelpful.

Just because one child doesn't do well in one environment does not mean the provider needs to rethink her entire profession.

That's a huge stretch and a really rude statement to make to someone that is trying to navigate the situation. She didn't post venting about the child, she posted asking for advice on what to do about the situation.

Telling someone else to rethink their profession is childish and immature not to mention just plain rude.
OP here, I didn't mean to take offense to the comment about my program not being good for the child. I was offended about the part where she said she was a mother and that she would be upset if her kid was alone in time out. I too am a mom. I never leave my kids or dck alone or in time out all day. I would never do such a thing.
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Old 09-12-2019, 11:22 AM
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I would just side step the drama and just listen to the heart of what is being said. Some people say things a little more blunt than others and forums are not always good for deciphering tone and intent

Can you possibly set up an indoor swing or some other form of physical stuff? If you are licensed maybe find out what you can legally have. I am legally unlicensed so I have a trampoline, a swing, giant bean bag mats and I just ordered steps and a slide made of foam. I have all toddlers and this is literally all they do all day. Run back and forth with carts and strollers and swing, jump and roll around. Inside, outside no matter where or how much they have already done. I wish I could bottle up their energy and drink it in the morning
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Old 09-12-2019, 12:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Valerie928 View Post
OP here, I didn't mean to take offense to the comment about my program not being good for the child. I was offended about the part where she said she was a mother and that she would be upset if her kid was alone in time out. I too am a mom. I never leave my kids or dck alone or in time out all day. I would never do such a thing.
I understand what you are saying but she didn't say anything close to you being a bad provider or that you leave your DCK's or children alone or in time out all day.

She said:

Quote:
Originally Posted by lblanke View Post
. I am sad that she is constantly in time out or alone.
I would be sad too if any child is constantly in time out or alone.

She did not state that you left her in time out alone all day.


She also said:

Quote:
Originally Posted by lblanke View Post
As a mom, I would be sad to hear that a very active child is being forced to sit in time out.
As a mom, I would think that any of us would be upset or sad to know our very active child is forced to sit in time out.



Look, I totally see how you were hurt by what was said but I think you reacted with emotion before actually hearing what she was saying.

I get it.

I react with emotion too at times but I've learned to take a step back and re-read or replay what was posted or said to me. Often times my emotions cloud the actual message and that is what I think happened here.

Knowing lblanke as a long standing member of this forum I am betting she did not in any way mean to imply you were a bad provider.
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Old 09-12-2019, 12:52 PM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
I understand what you are saying but she didn't say anything close to you being a bad provider or that you leave your DCK's or children alone or in time out all day.

She said:



I would be sad too if any child is constantly in time out or alone.

She did not state that you left her in time out alone all day.


She also said:



As a mom, I would think that any of us would be upset or sad to know our very active child is forced to sit in time out.



Look, I totally see how you were hurt by what was said but I think you reacted with emotion before actually hearing what she was saying.

I get it.

I react with emotion too at times but I've learned to take a step back and re-read or replay what was posted or said to me. Often times my emotions cloud the actual message and that is what I think happened here.

Knowing lblanke as a long standing member of this forum I am betting she did not in any way mean to imply you were a bad provider.
Ok, cool
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Old 09-12-2019, 01:27 PM
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It sounds like you've tried a lot of ways to work this out. At this point, I would say she needs something different. No shame in that. I struggle with managing hyper, super active or extremely stubborn DCKs. All kids have their moments where they test boundaries and such, and I deal with those developmental stages just fine. My home is just more laid back. Even our dogs are laid back.. Lol.... I enjoy working with children who can learn and respect rules and boundaries, have age appropriate self control, are able to sit and play with their friends during free play or a focused activity like sensory boxes and can sit and eat lunch without going crazy. Again, age appropriate expectations here. I've done this for 7 years and have had plenty of 2 year olds who have fit that bill.

I've had a couple of the more hyper, impulsive kids and once they turn about 4, I recommend they move on to Preschool. By then, they're getting countless time outs each day and the parents and I have worked on their behavior together. Everyone is on board by then.

My own 16 year old son has ADD and I homeschool both of my teens. Believe me when I say it has been a struggle for he and I to come to a place of harmony - but he's my child. I have to love him and work with him (haha..). Daycare is a completely different story and if it becomes in my best interest to send them on their way (and honestly, it's in their best interest as well at that point), then I do it and don't feel bad about it. We're just not a good fit.

My hardest daycare kid started with me at 11 months old. I've also provided care for several of his younger siblings since he left. His parents thought a private preschool was going to be THE answer to his needs. A couple of years later, they were saying "we think public school is more what he needs". So, it's clear they are still trying to find a good fit for him several years later. We actually started homeschooling because we knew our son would struggle in a traditional learning environment.
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Old 09-12-2019, 04:07 PM
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No offense or disrespect was intended. One teacher may be perfect for many children, but some kids are not a good fit for the program.

You may even be the perfect provider for that child if you had a different mix of kids. Group dynamics is a very interesting phenomenon. I simply meant that your program might not be the best fit for her at this time. My own child had a teacher who was amazing. She had a set of boy/girl twins. The class was super busy. It was perfect for the girl and overwhelming for the boy. She was the perfect teacher for the girl, but it was not the right program for her twin. It really was not an indictment of you or your program.

I also see that I misread the original post a bit...I read it as she was constantly in time out...but you said she constantly riles the other kids in your group and time out and alone time are not helpful. I do think busy kids need lots of free play, wereas some kids need more structure and down time.


BTW-I was not the unregistered poster who made the additional comment.
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Old 09-12-2019, 04:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lblanke View Post
No offense or disrespect was intended. One teacher may be perfect for many children, but some kids are not a good fit for the program.

You may even be the perfect provider for that child if you had a different mix of kids. Group dynamics is a very interesting phenomenon. I simply meant that your program might not be the best fit for her at this time. My own child had a teacher who was amazing. She had a set of boy/girl twins. The class was super busy. It was perfect for the girl and overwhelming for the boy. She was the perfect teacher for the girl, but it was not the right program for her twin. It really was not an indictment of you or your program.

I also see that I misread the original post a bit...I read it as she was constantly in time out...but you said she constantly riles the other kids in your group and time out and alone time are not helpful. I do think busy kids need lots of free play, wereas some kids need more structure and down time.


BTW-I was not the unregistered poster who made the additional comment.
I understand where you were coming from😊
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Old 09-14-2019, 05:58 AM
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Just because a particular child isn’t a good fit for a program doesn’t mean the provider is in the wrong profession. It’s the same way with daycare teachers. Some providers prefer to work from home and wouldn’t fit well working in a large center while with others it’s the opposite. I absolutely love teaching preschool and working with another teacher and 15+ kids. I don’t think I could handle opening my home every day to care for children but I admire those who do.

Children are sometimes not a great fit for a particular program. I had a 4yo last year who was very social and active and his parents chose our large center because he hadn’t done well at a small home based daycare. This child was a true extrovert, very active, very smart, and needed to burn off energy. He did have to learn that there were times he had to sit still and listen but he did eventually thrive in our center and became something of a class leader. He was one of the oldest in the class and the other kids looked up to him.

I don’t know how to give advice because I don’t have much experience with toddlers and twos but maybe you could plan some more active games throughout the day. As to running inside I always tell them “we use our walking feet inside to be safe. Ms. Ceri wants all her friends to be safe.”

I hope things get better for you and this child.
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