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  #1  
Old 01-11-2016, 10:47 AM
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Default No Parents Allowed in Classroom

Hello,

I'm curious to hear opinions regarding a new policy in place at my childcare center. Parent are not allowed to enter the space because 'it stresses the children'.

Parents are asked to wait outside the door and the teacher meets and takes the child and belongings. This seems offputting.

Do you have any reaction to this? Ideas on how to start a conversation with the director about this?
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  #2  
Old 01-11-2016, 10:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Hello,

I'm curious to hear opinions regarding a new policy in place at my childcare center. Parent are not allowed to enter the space because 'it stresses the children'.

Parents are asked to wait outside the door and the teacher meets and takes the child and belongings. This seems offputting.

Do you have any reaction to this? Ideas on how to start a conversation with the director about this?
It absolutely does stress the children. Behaviors escalate, kids see one parent and want to see their own. A child having their own parent in the room can stress over who is "in charge" and display serious behaviors. I am in total agreement with the policy.
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  #3  
Old 01-11-2016, 10:55 AM
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It absolutely does stress the children. Behaviors escalate, kids see one parent and want to see their own. A child having their own parent in the room can stress over who is "in charge" and display serious behaviors. I am in total agreement with the policy.


I have the same rule. Parents bring their children in, I meet them at the door, we say our good byes there.
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  #4  
Old 01-11-2016, 11:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Leigh View Post
It absolutely does stress the children. Behaviors escalate, kids see one parent and want to see their own. A child having their own parent in the room can stress over who is "in charge" and display serious behaviors. I am in total agreement with the policy.
I agree with this as a provider but as a parent I would only feel comfortable if there is a good size viewing window where I can see my child or anyone can easily what is going on in the classroom. Most centers you can see inside the classroom so no need to go in.
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  #5  
Old 01-11-2016, 11:06 AM
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Originally Posted by TXhomedaycare View Post
I agree with this as a provider but as a parent I would only feel comfortable if there is a good size viewing window where I can see my child or anyone can easily what is going on in the classroom. Most centers you can see inside the classroom so no need to go in.
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  #6  
Old 01-11-2016, 11:11 AM
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Sounds to me like there may have a been a parent disrupting everyone so they included all parents in this rule. That would be my guess.
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  #7  
Old 01-11-2016, 11:51 AM
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From both a "teacher" and a parent perspective...that doesn't sit well with me.

I totally understand the chaos that goes on when parents are in the room. But in every classroom I've been in, I've always trained the children to go in with life as normal when visitors are in the room. I don't have kids bothering other kids parents, crying, misbehaving. The parents also know that I'm not going to stand and chat with them longer than a few minutes.

But I have 4 year olds. I can see it being a little different in a toddler classroom.

However, as the parent of a toddler, I couldn't see myself being okay with never stepping into her classroom. I can see not coming in multiple times a day, or coming in and hanging around, or not bothering the other kids...but just to completely bar someone from a place where their young child is seems problematic.
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  #8  
Old 01-11-2016, 11:52 AM
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The rules must apply to everyone. It is disruptive, and some kids have stranger danger pretty bad. It also makes them antsy for waiting for their own parents, kids are excited to be picked no matter how much they love their providers and the fun they have there. Behaviors change greatly at pickup time.
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  #9  
Old 01-11-2016, 11:58 AM
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Have an open conversation with the director about the rule change. There could be a serious reason why they need to do this. Maybe they want to keep track of who is picking the child up and make sure it's not too chaotic so they can keep track. It could be a security issue. If you feel like you can't trust the center anymore then maybe you should look for a new one if you don't agree with the changes.
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  #10  
Old 01-11-2016, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by MunchkinWrangler View Post
Have an open conversation with the director about the rule change. There could be a serious reason why they need to do this. Maybe they want to keep track of who is picking the child up and make sure it's not too chaotic so they can keep track. It could be a security issue. If you feel like you can't trust the center anymore then maybe you should look for a new one if you don't agree with the changes.

It is possible that it is simply a security issue. If the children begin to act up at pick up time, it takes more focus off the other children while they handle the transition, so maybe there have been issues with the security and safety of the other children at pick up. I agree, though, if it makes you uncomfortable, maybe just ask why the rule was implemented and then make the choice to deal with it or not.
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  #11  
Old 01-11-2016, 12:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Hello,

I'm curious to hear opinions regarding a new policy in place at my childcare center. Parent are not allowed to enter the space because 'it stresses the children'.

Parents are asked to wait outside the door and the teacher meets and takes the child and belongings. This seems offputting.

Do you have any reaction to this? Ideas on how to start a conversation with the director about this?
Although the center may have implemented this new rule, most states do have an "open door policy" meaning you can pick your child up at ANY time and they cannot deny you access to your child.

Open door policy does NOT mean you can simply show up, hang out and then leave again, it just means they cannot deny you access to YOUR child at ANY time during the day.

If you are concerned about anything going on, I'd show up at a random time and pick my child up.

Doing that won't give you access to the classroom but you can still use the element of surprise when retrieving your child from care.

I do agree with PP's though that have said to have a discussion with the Director and find out why the rule was put in place.
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  #12  
Old 01-11-2016, 12:25 PM
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What state are you in?

In my state, centers MUST allow parents of enrolled children to visit the classroom any time they wish during hours of operation.
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  #13  
Old 01-11-2016, 12:51 PM
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most laws say you have access to your child, you do NOT have access to other children.

I can give you a very real life situation I had to deal with.

I knew someone who was a registered S.offender. Crime was against children under 14, including toddlers. This man also had a child that was age 3. He was and still is allowed to go to the daycare, preschool, elementary school and so on as long as he is going there to access his own child. How would you feel about this man being in a classroom with your child?

we can NOT force parents to take a back ground check, therefore we can not allow any parent to have access to any child but their own.

I follow this to a T. Not only for the child's safety, but for the parents safety as well.

What if a child went home and said Susies mommy hit me at school today??? As the provider I don't see everything and now it is the kids word against the parents word. I don't want to have anyone in that situation. Trust me when I tell you, kids will make things up and say only bits and pieces of what did happen.

for the safety of all children in care and parents, parents will only have access to their own child.
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  #14  
Old 01-11-2016, 02:02 PM
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In Ca. it is required that parents are allowed to have access to any space child care is conducted whenever their child is in care. This includes the classroom, and if in a family child care home, any spaces in the home that the children have access to while in attendance.
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  #15  
Old 01-11-2016, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by CoachingForQualityImprovement View Post
In Ca. it is required that parents are allowed to have access to any space child care is conducted whenever their child is in care. This includes the classroom, and if in a family child care home, any spaces in the home that the children have access to while in attendance.
That is the rule for centers in my state but not for in-home child care. We just have to allow the parent access to their child.

Centers have to allow parents to visit the center ANY time during business hours...... even on days their child isnt in attendance.
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  #16  
Old 01-11-2016, 02:21 PM
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Originally Posted by CoachingForQualityImprovement View Post
In Ca. it is required that parents are allowed to have access to any space child care is conducted whenever their child is in care. This includes the classroom, and if in a family child care home, any spaces in the home that the children have access to while in attendance.
of course check with your licensing, because I was only told that they had to have access to their children. I do not have to allow them past my foyer.

I don't let parents use my bathroom, or their siblings.

when you let parents in the house you are also taking on the risk of increasing liability. what happens if they trip over a toy and fall and get hurt.

Parents need to stay at the foyer where I know it is 100% safe for them to be.
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  #17  
Old 01-11-2016, 02:33 PM
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of course check with your licensing, because I was only told that they had to have access to their children. I do not have to allow them past my foyer.

I don't let parents use my bathroom, or their siblings.

when you let parents in the house you are also taking on the risk of increasing liability. what happens if they trip over a toy and fall and get hurt.

Parents need to stay at the foyer where I know it is 100% safe for them to be.
If a parent or authorized rep of the child requests to inspect your home, in spaces where children are cared for, you cannot legally deny them the right to do so. Here are the Title 22 regulations for California Family Child Care Homes related to this topic:


Regulations FAMILY CHILD CARE HOMES 102419 (Cont.)
102419 ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND PARENTAL AND AUTHORIZED 102419
REPRESENTATIVE’S RIGHTS
(Continued)
(1) The licensee shall request the child's parent or authorized representative to sign and date the
bottom portion of the notice form LIC 995A (8/06), which acknowledges that the parent or
authorized representative has received and read the LIC 995A. The bottom portion of this form
must be kept in the child’s file as proof that the parent or authorized representative has been
notified of his or her rights and received a copy of the Caregiver background Check Process, LIC
995E (6/05), and the Family Child Care Consumer Awareness Information, LIC 9212 (10/05).
(2) Whenever a parent or authorized representative makes a request pursuant to Section 102419(a)(8),
the licensee shall note, date, and initial the request in the child’s file. The licensee shall request
that the parent or authorized representative also initial the notation documenting the request.
(3) Reserved
(A) Upon a finding of noncompliance with a plan of correction for violation of Sections
102419(a)(8), (b), (c), (d), (d)(1), or (d)(2), the Department shall impose a civil penalty of
fifty dollars ($50) per day until the deficiency is corrected.
(B) Regardless of whether the licensee complies with an initial plan of correction in the time
allotted, if the licensee subsequently violates any provision of Sections 102419(a)(8), (b),
(c), (d), (d)(1), or (d)(2) within 12 months of the initial citation, the Department shall
assess a civil penalty of $150 plus an assessment of $50 per day until the deficiency is
corrected.
(C) Regardless of whether the licensee complies with the deficiency in Section
102419(b)(3)(B), if the licensee subsequently violates any provision of Sections
102419(a)(8), (b), (c), (d), (d)(1), or (d)(2) within 12 months of the citation and
assessment in Section 102419(b)(3)(B), the Department shall assess a civil penalty of
$150 plus an assessment of $150 per day until the deficiency is corrected.
(e) Upon presenting identification, the parent or authorized representative of a child in care has the right to
enter and inspect the family child care home without advance notice during the family child care home's
normal operating hours.

(1) When inspecting the family child care home, the parent or authorized representatives shall be
respectful of the children's routines and programmed activities.

(f) No family child care home shall discriminate or retaliate against any child or any child's parent or
authorized representative because the parent or authorized representative has exercised his or her right to
inspect the family child care home or has lodged a complaint with the Department against the family
child care home
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  #18  
Old 01-11-2016, 02:46 PM
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Unregistered OP, which state are you in and is it a center or family child care home?
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  #19  
Old 01-11-2016, 02:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachingForQualityImprovement View Post
If a parent or authorized rep of the child requests to inspect your home, in spaces where children are cared for, you cannot legally deny them the right to do so. Here are the Title 22 regulations for California Family Child Care Homes related to this topic:


Regulations FAMILY CHILD CARE HOMES 102419 (Cont.)
102419 ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND PARENTAL AND AUTHORIZED 102419
REPRESENTATIVE’S RIGHTS
(Continued)
(1) The licensee shall request the child's parent or authorized representative to sign and date the
bottom portion of the notice form LIC 995A (8/06), which acknowledges that the parent or
authorized representative has received and read the LIC 995A. The bottom portion of this form
must be kept in the child’s file as proof that the parent or authorized representative has been
notified of his or her rights and received a copy of the Caregiver background Check Process, LIC
995E (6/05), and the Family Child Care Consumer Awareness Information, LIC 9212 (10/05).
(2) Whenever a parent or authorized representative makes a request pursuant to Section 102419(a)(8),
the licensee shall note, date, and initial the request in the child’s file. The licensee shall request
that the parent or authorized representative also initial the notation documenting the request.
(3) Reserved
(A) Upon a finding of noncompliance with a plan of correction for violation of Sections
102419(a)(8), (b), (c), (d), (d)(1), or (d)(2), the Department shall impose a civil penalty of
fifty dollars ($50) per day until the deficiency is corrected.
(B) Regardless of whether the licensee complies with an initial plan of correction in the time
allotted, if the licensee subsequently violates any provision of Sections 102419(a)(8), (b),
(c), (d), (d)(1), or (d)(2) within 12 months of the initial citation, the Department shall
assess a civil penalty of $150 plus an assessment of $50 per day until the deficiency is
corrected.
(C) Regardless of whether the licensee complies with the deficiency in Section
102419(b)(3)(B), if the licensee subsequently violates any provision of Sections
102419(a)(8), (b), (c), (d), (d)(1), or (d)(2) within 12 months of the citation and
assessment in Section 102419(b)(3)(B), the Department shall assess a civil penalty of
$150 plus an assessment of $150 per day until the deficiency is corrected.
(e) Upon presenting identification, the parent or authorized representative of a child in care has the right to
enter and inspect the family child care home without advance notice during the family child care home's
normal operating hours.

(1) When inspecting the family child care home, the parent or authorized representatives shall be
respectful of the children's routines and programmed activities.

(f) No family child care home shall discriminate or retaliate against any child or any child's parent or
authorized representative because the parent or authorized representative has exercised his or her right to
inspect the family child care home or has lodged a complaint with the Department against the family
child care home
yes they can inspect when they come to visit my home. BUt if there child is in the front room area where we conduct all drop off and pick up, then why would a parent need to go into my back yard or bathroom.

If a parent demanded to inspect my home I would want a reason. Even though they have the right to do so, I would want to know why they felt they needed to.

I guess for me this is very different for perhaps most DCP, as my house, excluding my personal bedrooms is the entire daycare. YOu can see all of it from my foyer.

also this: 1) When inspecting the family child care home, the parent or authorized representatives shall be
respectful of the children's routines and programmed activities. This is another reason why parents stay at the foyer. I cant deny a parent acces to their child, but I can set rules that dictate that I do not want parents to pick up during nap time or after a certain time or etc. HOWEVER, we both know that if a parent did, I can not deny them access to their child if they are in my care.

Also, I wanted to add that it says a parent can inspect at any time during hours of operation and that is only true if they have a child in my care on that day. they can not come in on their child's unscheduled day and demand to inspect my home.
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  #20  
Old 01-11-2016, 03:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachingForQualityImprovement View Post
If a parent or authorized rep of the child requests to inspect your home, in spaces where children are cared for, you cannot legally deny them the right to do so. Here are the Title 22 regulations for California Family Child Care Homes related to this topic:


Regulations FAMILY CHILD CARE HOMES 102419 (Cont.)
102419 ADMISSION PROCEDURES AND PARENTAL AND AUTHORIZED 102419
REPRESENTATIVE’S RIGHTS
(Continued)
(1) The licensee shall request the child's parent or authorized representative to sign and date the
bottom portion of the notice form LIC 995A (8/06), which acknowledges that the parent or
authorized representative has received and read the LIC 995A. The bottom portion of this form
must be kept in the child’s file as proof that the parent or authorized representative has been
notified of his or her rights and received a copy of the Caregiver background Check Process, LIC
995E (6/05), and the Family Child Care Consumer Awareness Information, LIC 9212 (10/05).
(2) Whenever a parent or authorized representative makes a request pursuant to Section 102419(a)(8),
the licensee shall note, date, and initial the request in the child’s file. The licensee shall request
that the parent or authorized representative also initial the notation documenting the request.
(3) Reserved
(A) Upon a finding of noncompliance with a plan of correction for violation of Sections
102419(a)(8), (b), (c), (d), (d)(1), or (d)(2), the Department shall impose a civil penalty of
fifty dollars ($50) per day until the deficiency is corrected.
(B) Regardless of whether the licensee complies with an initial plan of correction in the time
allotted, if the licensee subsequently violates any provision of Sections 102419(a)(8), (b),
(c), (d), (d)(1), or (d)(2) within 12 months of the initial citation, the Department shall
assess a civil penalty of $150 plus an assessment of $50 per day until the deficiency is
corrected.
(C) Regardless of whether the licensee complies with the deficiency in Section
102419(b)(3)(B), if the licensee subsequently violates any provision of Sections
102419(a)(8), (b), (c), (d), (d)(1), or (d)(2) within 12 months of the citation and
assessment in Section 102419(b)(3)(B), the Department shall assess a civil penalty of
$150 plus an assessment of $150 per day until the deficiency is corrected.
(e) Upon presenting identification, the parent or authorized representative of a child in care has the right to
enter and inspect the family child care home without advance notice during the family child care home's
normal operating hours.

(1) When inspecting the family child care home, the parent or authorized representatives shall be
respectful of the children's routines and programmed activities.

(f) No family child care home shall discriminate or retaliate against any child or any child's parent or
authorized representative because the parent or authorized representative has exercised his or her right to
inspect the family child care home or has lodged a complaint with the Department against the family
child care home
Thank you for sharing that.
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  #21  
Old 01-11-2016, 05:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daycare View Post
yes they can inspect when they come to visit my home. BUt if there child is in the front room area where we conduct all drop off and pick up, then why would a parent need to go into my back yard or bathroom.

If a parent demanded to inspect my home I would want a reason. Even though they have the right to do so, I would want to know why they felt they needed to.

I guess for me this is very different for perhaps most DCP, as my house, excluding my personal bedrooms is the entire daycare. YOu can see all of it from my foyer.

also this: 1) When inspecting the family child care home, the parent or authorized representatives shall be
respectful of the children's routines and programmed activities. This is another reason why parents stay at the foyer. I cant deny a parent acces to their child, but I can set rules that dictate that I do not want parents to pick up during nap time or after a certain time or etc. HOWEVER, we both know that if a parent did, I can not deny them access to their child if they are in my care.

Also, I wanted to add that it says a parent can inspect at any time during hours of operation and that is only true if they have a child in my care on that day. they can not come in on their child's unscheduled day and demand to inspect my home.
The point is they CAN and LEGALLY have the right to enter the facility and inspect ANY space where child care is typically provided. I understand you not necessarily wanting them to, but it is their right. You stated that you do not have to let them past your foyer, and that is not accurate.
I think that questioning why a parent might want to see the spaces where their child spends much of their time might make the parents question what you feel you need to hide (FTR-I know you aren't trying to hide anything, but I can see a parent being skeptical) Reasons a parent might want to (and SHOULD, imo) see spaces that their child has access to is to ensure they are always in a safe environment and to get a sense of what their child is doing throughout each day.

Certainly parents need to be respectful and considerate, such as not requesting to inspect during nap time, etc.

I just wanted to make sure that providers have the accurate info that is actually written in the regs and is also the first thing listed on the Parental Rights form (995A) that we have them sign at enrollment
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  #22  
Old 01-11-2016, 05:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sharlan View Post
Thank you for sharing that.
You're welcome
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  #23  
Old 01-11-2016, 05:24 PM
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In my state I was told by licensing that a parent has no right to walk around my home for any reason, even daycare areas. Point is, you don't know their background but we are given resources to check if we want to. I have very respectful parents and they never cross the entryway even if invited in.
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  #24  
Old 01-11-2016, 05:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoachingForQualityImprovement View Post
The point is they CAN and LEGALLY have the right to enter the facility and inspect ANY space where child care is typically provided. I understand you not necessarily wanting them to, but it is their right. You stated that you do not have to let them past your foyer, and that is not accurate.
I think that questioning why a parent might want to see the spaces where their child spends much of their time might make the parents question what you feel you need to hide (FTR-I know you aren't trying to hide anything, but I can see a parent being skeptical) Reasons a parent might want to (and SHOULD, imo) see spaces that their child has access to is to ensure they are always in a safe environment and to get a sense of what their child is doing throughout each day.

Certainly parents need to be respectful and considerate, such as not requesting to inspect during nap time, etc.

I just wanted to make sure that providers have the accurate info that is actually written in the regs and is also the first thing listed on the Parental Rights form (995A) that we have them sign at enrollment
I hear what you are saying but as I stated you can see every daycare space from my foyer so they would not need to come in and inspect. They can see it from right there.
Yes they have every right but if a parent walked in and said I want to inspect your backyard I am probably going to ask why and then let them.
In public schools thenkidsbline up at a number and the teacher meets the students outside and then take to the classroom. Parents are not welcome to come in the classroom. As a provider I understand this.

But yes, you are correct in saying that they have the right and we can't deny them of that
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  #25  
Old 01-11-2016, 09:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MunchkinWrangler View Post
In my state I was told by licensing that a parent has no right to walk around my home for any reason, even daycare areas. Point is, you don't know their background but we are given resources to check if we want to. I have very respectful parents and they never cross the entryway even if invited in.
Luckily for us, our state only requires that type of access to parents in centers.

Family child care in our state only requires you to allow a parent access to their child any time during the day (open door policy). Meaning they can stop in and pick up any time. You do not have to give them any access beyond the entryway.
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  #26  
Old 01-12-2016, 06:11 AM
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I would just have a policy that parents are allowed to inspect. However, due to children’s routine, child must leave with parent after inspection is completed.
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  #27  
Old 01-12-2016, 06:47 AM
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Thanks all for your responses.

This is a center in Minnesota. I'm less worried about the legality of it than the notion I (as a parent) have no idea what is happening in the classrooms (especially my nonverbal toddler).

I was a toddler and preschool teacher for years and never would have imagined banning parents from my room. Granted, I never had any lingering or problematic parents but I would never enforce a policy like this.
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  #28  
Old 01-12-2016, 07:42 AM
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Thanks all for your responses.

This is a center in Minnesota. I'm less worried about the legality of it than the notion I (as a parent) have no idea what is happening in the classrooms (especially my nonverbal toddler).

I was a toddler and preschool teacher for years and never would have imagined banning parents from my room. Granted, I never had any lingering or problematic parents but I would never enforce a policy like this.
I would definitely discuss this with the Director then to get the answers of find the comfort level you need as a parent.

However, it is illegal. I am in MN as well and the state statutes clearly state that parents of enrolled children can have access to the classroom ANY time they wish. Even on days their child is not present. I can share the statute number if you need/want it.
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Old 01-12-2016, 10:16 AM
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I would appreciate that! I found the licensing requirement on parents entering the center but not classrooms. Thanks!
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Old 01-12-2016, 10:25 AM
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I would appreciate that! I found the licensing requirement on parents entering the center but not classrooms. Thanks!
https://www.revisor.mn.gov/rules/?id=9503

9503.0095 PARENT VISITATION.
Parents of enrolled children may visit the center any time during the hours of operation.
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Old 01-12-2016, 12:45 PM
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I am in Utah. Regs state that a parent must have access to their child and to any area their child may be in during the day.

I give plenty of time at interview for parents to see my home and look around. Other than that, licensing takes care of inspections and parents can check licensing records.

I make sure that parents know they have access to THEIR child and THEIR child only.

If they insist on re-inspecting my home, they have a legal right to....however they have to wait until I can safely remove all other children from areas they want to see. They will NEVER be allowed to be around a child who is not their own.

I also feel that if a parent has that much distrust in my care and feels they have to re-inspect my home....then they need to take their child elsewhere. I expect a trusting relationship. If they have a concern, I expect an open, adult discussion. They can talk to me or to licensing.

For a parent to show up out of the blue and demand to inspect someone's home shows IMMENSE distrust of the provider and a parent should look for other care, such as a nanny.
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Old 01-12-2016, 12:52 PM
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this is exactly how I feel...

If you need to inspect my home, then perhaps you don't trust me and if you don't trust me we are not a good fit for each other.
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Old 01-12-2016, 02:35 PM
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I understand other providers' feelings and stance regarding not wanting parents walking around their home, and the need for a trusting relationship.

That said, I have never considered parents to be mistrusting simply because they wish to see the space their child plays in on a daily basis. I look at it as the parent taking an interest in their child's life. My families always entered my home and came in to spend a few moments with their children and their provider in the environment in which their child plays, grows and develops. I think that being welcoming to them in such a way DID build trust, and I always had very close relationships with the children and families in my program. Of course, parents were never alone with the children, but they did spend time here daily, when time allowed, of course.

I also consider all of the cases of abuse at child care programs that parents hear about in the news......most of the parents who have had a child abused, or god forbid, die in the care of a child care provider trusted their provider as well, probably so much so that they didn't feel the need to "inspect" the environment. I wonder if some of those parents feel as though there may have been a different outcome had they regularly spent a few moments in those environments. I wonder if parents who have children in care feel as though it is pertinent that they do so, in an effort to prevent something awful happening. No matter how much one trusts a provider, you can never 100%, without a doubt, trust anyone, especially someone who is basically a stranger to you and your child. I know I didn't fully trust anyone with my children when they were young, hence my reason for becoming a provider in the first place.
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Old 01-12-2016, 03:00 PM
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I understand other providers' feelings and stance regarding not wanting parents walking around their home, and the need for a trusting relationship.

That said, I have never considered parents to be mistrusting simply because they wish to see the space their child plays in on a daily basis. I look at it as the parent taking an interest in their child's life. My families always entered my home and came in to spend a few moments with their children and their provider in the environment in which their child plays, grows and develops. I think that being welcoming to them in such a way DID build trust, and I always had very close relationships with the children and families in my program. Of course, parents were never alone with the children, but they did spend time here daily, when time allowed, of course.

I also consider all of the cases of abuse at child care programs that parents hear about in the news......most of the parents who have had a child abused, or god forbid, die in the care of a child care provider trusted their provider as well, probably so much so that they didn't feel the need to "inspect" the environment. I wonder if some of those parents feel as though there may have been a different outcome had they regularly spent a few moments in those environments. I wonder if parents who have children in care feel as though it is pertinent that they do so, in an effort to prevent something awful happening. No matter how much one trusts a provider, you can never 100%, without a doubt, trust anyone, especially someone who is basically a stranger to you and your child. I know I didn't fully trust anyone with my children when they were young, hence my reason for becoming a provider in the first place.

Yep, my thoughts as well!
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Old 01-12-2016, 03:15 PM
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Originally Posted by CoachingForQualityImprovement View Post
I understand other providers' feelings and stance regarding not wanting parents walking around their home, and the need for a trusting relationship.

That said, I have never considered parents to be mistrusting simply because they wish to see the space their child plays in on a daily basis. I look at it as the parent taking an interest in their child's life. My families always entered my home and came in to spend a few moments with their children and their provider in the environment in which their child plays, grows and develops. I think that being welcoming to them in such a way DID build trust, and I always had very close relationships with the children and families in my program. Of course, parents were never alone with the children, but they did spend time here daily, when time allowed, of course.

I also consider all of the cases of abuse at child care programs that parents hear about in the news......most of the parents who have had a child abused, or god forbid, die in the care of a child care provider trusted their provider as well, probably so much so that they didn't feel the need to "inspect" the environment. I wonder if some of those parents feel as though there may have been a different outcome had they regularly spent a few moments in those environments. I wonder if parents who have children in care feel as though it is pertinent that they do so, in an effort to prevent something awful happening. No matter how much one trusts a provider, you can never 100%, without a doubt, trust anyone, especially someone who is basically a stranger to you and your child. I know I didn't fully trust anyone with my children when they were young, hence my reason for becoming a provider in the first place.
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Old 01-12-2016, 03:24 PM
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Originally Posted by CoachingForQualityImprovement View Post
I understand other providers' feelings and stance regarding not wanting parents walking around their home, and the need for a trusting relationship.

That said, I have never considered parents to be mistrusting simply because they wish to see the space their child plays in on a daily basis. I look at it as the parent taking an interest in their child's life. My families always entered my home and came in to spend a few moments with their children and their provider in the environment in which their child plays, grows and develops. I think that being welcoming to them in such a way DID build trust, and I always had very close relationships with the children and families in my program. Of course, parents were never alone with the children, but they did spend time here daily, when time allowed, of course.

I also consider all of the cases of abuse at child care programs that parents hear about in the news......most of the parents who have had a child abused, or god forbid, die in the care of a child care provider trusted their provider as well, probably so much so that they didn't feel the need to "inspect" the environment. I wonder if some of those parents feel as though there may have been a different outcome had they regularly spent a few moments in those environments. I wonder if parents who have children in care feel as though it is pertinent that they do so, in an effort to prevent something awful happening. No matter how much one trusts a provider, you can never 100%, without a doubt, trust anyone, especially someone who is basically a stranger to you and your child. I know I didn't fully trust anyone with my children when they were young, hence my reason for becoming a provider in the first place.
I used to be exactly this way. I have nothing to hide and all of my parents used to be welcome in my daycare rooms at any time. HOWEVER in the last few years, I have seen a huge change in parenting which has resulted a huge change in how children behave today.

Today, I find that about 99.9 % of my kids can't follow the rules when their parent is here and 99.9% of the parents do nothing about it. So I have no desire to invite this in.

NOW if you can manage your child while you are here and follow the rules, then I would have no problem if you came in and finished coloring a picture with your child, but just know that you must be under staff supervision, as there are other children around.

sadly, this is not the case.

when I allowed parents to come in, they used it as a social time with other parents while their child ran like crazy destroying my house. The parents today don't mind their children like in years past.

So for me and most, it is only fair that everyone has the same rule of pick up and go.

Every question or concern a parent has about their child or my program isVERY important to me and I am sure that just about all of us can say the same. so I hope that at anytime they every needed something addressed they are comfortable enough to ask. If they are not comfortable with being able to ask, then they are not in the right program.

Yes, we need to address licensing rules and regs and follow them to the T, but we also must set up a successful program that doesn't allow for chaos and destruction to take place.

I really think this is why so many places are resorting to this type of no parent in the classroom, becuase sadly it's not the child, it's the parent not parenting the child. and as they say, it only takes one to ruin if for everybody else.
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Old 01-12-2016, 06:12 PM
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I just think it's neither necessary nor okay. I can understand someone's private home, but in a center classroom - what for? Unless people are lingering or excessively interacting with other people's children, it just seems cold.

For myself, I work at the center where my two-year-old daughter attends, so I have the luxury of peeking at her without entering her room at different times of the day. But I went to pick her up one day, and she was playing in the kitchen center. I watched her painstakingly separate all the silverware, dishes, food, etc and put them away in the correct baskets without a single prompt. I was impressed. I wouldn't have know she could do that if I wasn't allowed in her classroom.
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Old 01-13-2016, 01:09 PM
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I used to be exactly this way. I have nothing to hide and all of my parents used to be welcome in my daycare rooms at any time. HOWEVER in the last few years, I have seen a huge change in parenting which has resulted a huge change in how children behave today.

Today, I find that about 99.9 % of my kids can't follow the rules when their parent is here and 99.9% of the parents do nothing about it. So I have no desire to invite this in.

NOW if you can manage your child while you are here and follow the rules, then I would have no problem if you came in and finished coloring a picture with your child, but just know that you must be under staff supervision, as there are other children around.

sadly, this is not the case.

when I allowed parents to come in, they used it as a social time with other parents while their child ran like crazy destroying my house. The parents today don't mind their children like in years past.

So for me and most, it is only fair that everyone has the same rule of pick up and go.

Every question or concern a parent has about their child or my program isVERY important to me and I am sure that just about all of us can say the same. so I hope that at anytime they every needed something addressed they are comfortable enough to ask. If they are not comfortable with being able to ask, then they are not in the right program.

Yes, we need to address licensing rules and regs and follow them to the T, but we also must set up a successful program that doesn't allow for chaos and destruction to take place.

I really think this is why so many places are resorting to this type of no parent in the classroom, becuase sadly it's not the child, it's the parent not parenting the child. and as they say, it only takes one to ruin if for everybody else.
I agree.

I used to have a "come on in and stay a while" attitude. That changed after I discovered one of our daycare dad's was a child molester. Even though he was never alone with the kids, it frightened me to death that he had been there many, many times feasting his sick eyes on my daycare kids. We have no idea who these parents really are.

I also think parenting has changed. I used to be confident that if a child decided to push boundaries, that the parent would step in straight away.

Doesn't happen now. Today's parents think it's perfectly OK for their kids to jump on somebody's couch, to interrupt an adult and to basically run riot.

So I make sure parents know......MY house. MY rules.

I meet all state regs and have had a perfect record for over 30 years. If that's not enough...and they don't trust me to keep a safe and clean home......then bye-bye!!
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Old 01-14-2016, 05:36 AM
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I understand everyone has their comfort levels.

But at the end of the day if the state has a regulation saying parents can have access to their day care area/building/facility then it's kind of a non issue. Doesn't matter that you don't like it, you can't say no.

And that said, if I had a parent who insisted on being here, hanging out, etc I would probably term. Ends the problem without me getting a citation for not complying with regs.
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Old 01-14-2016, 06:26 AM
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I understand everyone has their comfort levels.

But at the end of the day if the state has a regulation saying parents can have access to their day care area/building/facility then it's kind of a non issue. Doesn't matter that you don't like it, you can't say no.

And that said, if I had a parent who insisted on being here, hanging out, etc I would probably term. Ends the problem without me getting a citation for not complying with regs.
Big difference in hanging out and wanting to inspect.
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Old 01-14-2016, 08:46 AM
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Big difference in hanging out and wanting to inspect.
Not really. Make no mistake, a parent who is hanging out at a child care is in all likelihood inspecting the day care. Seeing how the provider interacts with the kids, seeing how the space works, checking out what activities are being offered, etc.

But legally you do not have the right to tell a parent the can't have access to view the day care space during day care hours.
It doesn't get much clearer than that.

You can try to talk out both sides of your tongue until the cows come home. It doesn't matter. If a parent asks to inspect a space during day care hours you can't say no.
That's not opinion, it's a fact.
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Old 01-14-2016, 09:43 AM
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I understand what you are saying and YES a parent has every right to come into the childcare and if they wanted to, I do have to allow them to, but I DO NOT have to allow them to hang out.

When a parent comes to possibly enroll, I will show them every area their child will be allowed to play in/sleep etc and they can take the time to inspect those areas at that time.

If a parent walked in and said do you mind if I check out or inspect the daycare after being enrolled for any length of time, of course we have to allow them and of course I would. BUT I would also ask is there something wrong? To me that just seems like they have a concern that needs to be addressed.

Daily I do have parents ask, do you mind if I go watch them play in the backyard through the window and of course I have no problem with that. AS LONG AS THEY ARE NOT CREATING ISSUES, like out of control child or the parent just wants to hang out and talk. Sorry I don't have time for that, I have kids to care for and you can call me later when I am free to talk. I do have every right to ask them to leave if they are creating issues, because when they create issues it jeopardizes my ability to care for all of the other children in care. which i believe that in our licensing regs it does state that at no time should another child's needs jeopardize the care of others. Our regs do state under section 102417 that children must be supervised at all times.

If I had to constantly allow for a parent to inspect my home, then I would not be able to abide by that reg.

Nanny de bye bye outside was even approved by my inspector, not giving the parent access to the home daily because of the fact that I was giving the parent prior knowledge that this was going to be taking place every day when they came to get their child. However, if the parent asked to come in I would have to allow them to. In this case if I had a child that needed bye bye outside but would not agree to it, then I would have to term.
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Old 01-14-2016, 09:54 AM
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I understand what you are saying and YES a parent has every right to come into the childcare and if they wanted to, I do have to allow them to, but I DO NOT have to allow them to hang out.

When a parent comes to possibly enroll, I will show them every area their child will be allowed to play in/sleep etc and they can take the time to inspect those areas at that time.

If a parent walked in and said do you mind if I check out or inspect the daycare after being enrolled for any length of time, of course we have to allow them and of course I would. BUT I would also ask is there something wrong? To me that just seems like they have a concern that needs to be addressed.

Daily I do have parents ask, do you mind if I go watch them play in the backyard through the window and of course I have no problem with that. AS LONG AS THEY ARE NOT CREATING ISSUES, like out of control child or the parent just wants to hang out and talk. Sorry I don't have time for that, I have kids to care for and you can call me later when I am free to talk. I do have every right to ask them to leave if they are creating issues, because when they create issues it jeopardizes my ability to care for all of the other children in care. which i believe that in our licensing regs it does state that at no time should another child's needs jeopardize the care of others. Our regs do state under section 102417 that children must be supervised at all times.

If I had to constantly allow for a parent to inspect my home, then I would not be able to abide by that reg.

Nanny de bye bye outside was even approved by my inspector, not giving the parent access to the home daily because of the fact that I was giving the parent prior knowledge that this was going to be taking place every day when they came to get their child. However, if the parent asked to come in I would have to allow them to. In this case if I had a child that needed bye bye outside but would not agree to it, then I would have to term.
I never said you had to allow a parent to hang out. I said IF I had a parent who insisted on hanging out, I would term, because it would mean they didn't trust me. In response to your post I simply pointed out that "hanging" out is another way for parents to try to inspect the day care.

And I even said in my op that I would allow a parent to inspect the day care area if they asked because I have to, but it most likely would mean a term was coming.

I don't like it any better than anyone else. But if it's a reg then it's a reg.
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Old 01-14-2016, 11:04 AM
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I understand what you are saying and YES a parent has every right to come into the childcare and if they wanted to, I do have to allow them to, but I DO NOT have to allow them to hang out.

When a parent comes to possibly enroll, I will show them every area their child will be allowed to play in/sleep etc and they can take the time to inspect those areas at that time.

If a parent walked in and said do you mind if I check out or inspect the daycare after being enrolled for any length of time, of course we have to allow them and of course I would. BUT I would also ask is there something wrong? To me that just seems like they have a concern that needs to be addressed.

Daily I do have parents ask, do you mind if I go watch them play in the backyard through the window and of course I have no problem with that. AS LONG AS THEY ARE NOT CREATING ISSUES, like out of control child or the parent just wants to hang out and talk. Sorry I don't have time for that, I have kids to care for and you can call me later when I am free to talk. I do have every right to ask them to leave if they are creating issues, because when they create issues it jeopardizes my ability to care for all of the other children in care. which i believe that in our licensing regs it does state that at no time should another child's needs jeopardize the care of others. Our regs do state under section 102417 that children must be supervised at all times.

If I had to constantly allow for a parent to inspect my home, then I would not be able to abide by that reg.

Nanny de bye bye outside was even approved by my inspector, not giving the parent access to the home daily because of the fact that I was giving the parent prior knowledge that this was going to be taking place every day when they came to get their child. However, if the parent asked to come in I would have to allow them to. In this case if I had a child that needed bye bye outside but would not agree to it, then I would have to term.
I don't think anyone is arguing the fact that you must supervise at all times or that you cannot allow for visiting parents to disrupt care or supervision. IMO, you are being rather defensive about the whole thing and are stating things that no one has disputed with you - no one is arguing with you about your preferences, the argument was/is only the fact that it is a regulation and it has to be allowed if a parent requests.

Now, in reality, I don't think a parent would ever ask to "inspect". Not as licensing would do anyway. A parent inspection would/should consist of basic observation of the child in the space they play/sleep/toilet, etc. I certainly wouldn't allow going through drawers, cupboards, closets, etc. as those areas are off limits to children. But, come in and observe and check out play/sleep/toileting spaces, no problem. Again, all within reason, for short periods of time.
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Old 01-14-2016, 11:54 AM
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https://www.revisor.mn.gov/rules/?id=9503

9503.0095 PARENT VISITATION.
Parents of enrolled children may visit the center any time during the hours of operation.
Blackcat: I know that you're aware that I'm in the same state too, so I was curious about this (although my business is in-home).
I looked up the statute and that's a pretty broad definition. Technically, "Parents of enrolled children may visit the center any time during the hours of operation" can mean stepping foot into the front door. Not necessarily walking through the front door, down the hallway and into a classroom.
There is no elaboration on to what "visit" means or defines.
Have you personally discussed this statute with licensing?
They are notorious for gray areas, so I'm curious as to how open to interpretation it is.
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Old 01-14-2016, 12:06 PM
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Blackcat: I know that you're aware that I'm in the same state too, so I was curious about this (although my business is in-home).
I looked up the statute and that's a pretty broad definition. Technically, "Parents of enrolled children may visit the center any time during the hours of operation" can mean stepping foot into the front door. Not necessarily walking through the front door, down the hallway and into a classroom.
There is no elaboration on to what "visit" means or defines.
Have you personally discussed this statute with licensing?
They are notorious for gray areas, so I'm curious as to how open to interpretation it is.
Yes, it's been elaborated on several times in trainings Ive attended and "visit" as defined by DHS means visit; hang out, inspect, stay, look around etc.

ALL of which influence my decision to not license as a center.
Family child care providers are not required to do any more than answer the door and hand the child over.

I agree other than white 9 months of the year our state is pretty gray.

Its annoying to say the least so because I cannot handle vague or blurry rules, I constantly ask for eloborations and explanations mostly because I never want to give out false or mis-informed info when it comes to regulations.

It could mean the difference between a verbal warning or licensing revocation; depending on your area....kwim?
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Old 01-14-2016, 02:53 PM
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In the center I owned and the centers I worked in parents were welcomed! Parents have always been welcomed into my family child care also. I've never had any problem.
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Old 01-14-2016, 05:12 PM
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My parents usually come in the living room to pick up. Some come in to drop off, others just drop at the door. But many times parents look into the play room to tell their kiddo to hurry up at pick up time. Usually they are already picking up when parents come, but they tend to want to linger with their friends. And at this point I am lucky to have all parents who want to GO.
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