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  #1  
Old 04-26-2015, 07:49 AM
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Default You Have To Watch If You Are Or Wish To Have A Play Based Program!

I remember that I responded to a thread a couple of days ago about someone being confused about play based programming and whether or not they were. There were a lot of responses, including from me. This video shows a true play based, child led program. It is awesome.
Now only if we all had the space to do something like this!



https://vimeo.com/28871572
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Old 04-26-2015, 08:59 AM
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Oh my. Love it!

My dd was watching with me and wants to go there

A lot of great ideas. Thanks for sharing!
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Old 04-26-2015, 12:01 PM
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That left me speechless. *I* want to go there!! The gondola, the custom built table where the kids can get right inside.....just everything!!

Bev Bos, isn't she the Ooey Gooey lady?
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Old 04-26-2015, 12:50 PM
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That left me speechless. *I* want to go there!! The gondola, the custom built table where the kids can get right inside.....just everything!!

Bev Bos, isn't she the Ooey Gooey lady?
Right! The gondola is so amazing. I've started checking kijiji for stuff
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Old 04-26-2015, 04:07 PM
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Wow what a beautiful place. Makes me wish I had a center and not provide care in my rental home so I have more opportunities to build things like this and foster more exploration
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Old 04-26-2015, 06:26 PM
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So great, thanks for posting. I was able to see her speak once at a conference and she's so inspiring, love it!
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Old 04-26-2015, 07:07 PM
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Love it!
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Old 04-27-2015, 02:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Josiegirl View Post
That left me speechless. *I* want to go there!! The gondola, the custom built table where the kids can get right inside.....just everything!!

Bev Bos, isn't she the Ooey Gooey lady?
No, Lisa Murphy is the O G Lady! Both are great creative souls!
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Old 04-27-2015, 03:19 AM
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Oh thank you!! I should've known that.
I'd love to see either one at a conference. Both are great!
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Old 04-27-2015, 06:21 AM
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That was an awesome place! I get nervous around so much clutter (even if it is enriching) so I would love to expand on this but in a little more organized or simplistic way. But I do LOVE it. Thanks for sharing!
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Old 04-27-2015, 06:34 AM
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This is absolutely amazing! Makes me dream for sure!
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Old 04-27-2015, 12:05 PM
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That was an awesome place! I get nervous around so much clutter (even if it is enriching) so I would love to expand on this but in a little more organized or simplistic way. But I do LOVE it. Thanks for sharing!
I do agree with you, my mind doesn't function well when there is so much clutter.
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Old 04-27-2015, 12:21 PM
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I've been thinking about this video all night... I'm so torn between two things...

It's so inspiring to hear Bev speak and just to think of how simple it is to allow children to have independence and control over their day and what materials they use and how they use them. At one point, she was showing a cute little hidden space and said that a child could choose to have a little snack in that space by herself. This sounds so lovely and ideal and what I think it shoud be like, HOWEVER, I am tasked with preparing children for kindergarten. I run a preschool in a college town (lots of professors kids). Most of my children go on to public school.

So, I am responsible to make sure that children are able to follow directions, participate in a group, recognize and can write upper and lower case letters, know their letter sounds, etc etc etc. I help them learn table manners, passing items, pouring milk. I DO run a play-based program and make sure that we're learning all of these things through play, we don't do worksheets or anything, but it's still not as 'ideal' as what she does.

Everyday, I run a small group activity that is teacher led and yes, pretty much the kids have to join me. I make them come to morning meeting and circle time at the end of the program (they all want to come to these things anyways, but when they first start, I sometimes have one that is reluctant and I pretty much just tell them they have to...ha, so they do). I feel like if I didn't plan art activities I have some children that would NEVER do art. They wouldn't learn cutting or gluing skills.

There are all of these things that I feel like I'm responsible for 'teaching' them or at least giving them experiences with because I feel like they should be prepared and confident when going to kindergarten. I would LOVE to just let them make their own choices all the time and encourage such freedom, but I just don't see how it's realistic. I wouldn't have clients if they didn't leave here ready for kindy.

Sorry for my ramble, does anyone else feel this way??
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Old 04-27-2015, 02:36 PM
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While I absolutely love what she offers, most of it isn't realistic in my setting because of mixed ages and a couple very sneaky kiddos. And let's face it, she doesn't live in her daycare when the kids aren't there. I cannot let the kids just go at it with paints whenever or wherever(I can see it now, Picasso prints all over my walls) or scissors( I do not want their child to cut their hair at dc, would rather they try that lil trick at home) Plus as much as I love the idea of kids having special lil hidey places, that's where I can see someone getting into trouble. Can anyone say playing doctor? It sounds like she has helpers that work with her and I'm by myself. I can't supervise everybody being all over the place at the same time.
But I'd love to make some changes based on some of her stuff. Like her lending library, love that idea! And I need to add more plant life(and hope I don't kill it). We're going to do veggie plants in pails this summer outside, a bean teepee, some smallish planter boxes with flowers in them. All those things the kids will expected to help care for, I'm going to plant grass in tires and place it near the outdoor road/town we're going to have. I've always been afraid everything will get uprooted and destroyed but the kids can touch, smell, feel, water, and if nothing grows, well it'll be no worse than last summer. No fencing them out of gardens this year.
Was it in this video where it was mentioned that swinging is good for brain development? Loved her swing by the way! I was thinking of doing away with our tire swing but the kids love it so I guess I'll keep it.

The parents' meetings that they were talking about...were they like a parent/teacher conference or was it all the parents getting together with Bev? That would be kinda cool, just to have meetings with everyone together, to discuss changes, ideas, etc.
So, those are some of my thoughts.
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Old 04-27-2015, 04:11 PM
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While I absolutely love what she offers, most of it isn't realistic in my setting because of mixed ages and a couple very sneaky kiddos. And let's face it, she doesn't live in her daycare when the kids aren't there. I cannot let the kids just go at it with paints whenever or wherever(I can see it now, Picasso prints all over my walls)
I have to agree with josiegirl....lovely but would never work for me
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Old 04-27-2015, 04:54 PM
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Am I the only one that saw a mess? Seriously my parents would freak out over the clutter and mess. Here when people are looking for childcare, they always post "must be spotless clean". Not that I agree kids need spotless, being a kid is messy, but the parents around here wouldn't go for that, or at least they say they wouldn't, who knows what their houses really look like.
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Old 04-27-2015, 05:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Josiegirl View Post
While I absolutely love what she offers, most of it isn't realistic in my setting because of mixed ages and a couple very sneaky kiddos. And let's face it, she doesn't live in her daycare when the kids aren't there. I cannot let the kids just go at it with paints whenever or wherever(I can see it now, Picasso prints all over my walls) or scissors( I do not want their child to cut their hair at dc, would rather they try that lil trick at home) Plus as much as I love the idea of kids having special lil hidey places, that's where I can see someone getting into trouble. Can anyone say playing doctor? It sounds like she has helpers that work with her and I'm by myself. I can't supervise everybody being all over the place at the same time.
But I'd love to make some changes based on some of her stuff. Like her lending library, love that idea! And I need to add more plant life(and hope I don't kill it). We're going to do veggie plants in pails this summer outside, a bean teepee, some smallish planter boxes with flowers in them. All those things the kids will expected to help care for, I'm going to plant grass in tires and place it near the outdoor road/town we're going to have. I've always been afraid everything will get uprooted and destroyed but the kids can touch, smell, feel, water, and if nothing grows, well it'll be no worse than last summer. No fencing them out of gardens this year.
Was it in this video where it was mentioned that swinging is good for brain development? Loved her swing by the way! I was thinking of doing away with our tire swing but the kids love it so I guess I'll keep it.

The parents' meetings that they were talking about...were they like a parent/teacher conference or was it all the parents getting together with Bev? That would be kinda cool, just to have meetings with everyone together, to discuss changes, ideas, etc.
So, those are some of my thoughts.
I looked on her preschool's website and they have parent meetings once a month from 7pm-10pm at night. From the video it kind of sounded like it was almost a parent education kind of meeting maybe?? I've run these kind of parent meetings, but don't think I have the commitment to do it once a month for three hours...ha!
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Old 04-27-2015, 06:09 PM
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I have to agree with josiegirl....lovely but would never work for me
yea the unfenced fish pond alone and the boy in underwear made me scratch my head
my licenser would have a field day with the write ups but we are in a different state so I don't know I didn't really watch the whole thing
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Old 04-27-2015, 08:36 PM
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I must confess. I did wonder, how would anything be sanitized?
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Old 04-27-2015, 08:36 PM
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my licenser would have a field day with the write ups
I was thinking this the whole time I was watching the video!

I love her philosophy of letting kids learn by play and like many of her ideas and enthusiasm but there was a lot there that wouldn't work for me since I have mixed ages - and lots of safety regulations to follow! I'm not sure if it was in this video or in another of hers that I looked at after viewing this one but she seems to shrug off the possibility of a child getting hurt in that environment - that it's no big deal; just a part of being a kid, exploring and learning. While I know that's true, I also know that many parents - and licensing - wouldn't necessarily shrug it off and I'd be held liable for any serious injury that happened on my watch. As I watched the boy splashing around in the water in the ditch area and listened to her describe the climbing structure made of rope and how some kids fall through it, I was thinking how much fun it would be for a kid but what a potential nightmare it could be for me as a provider.

I also agree with the others who mentioned the mess and clutter. I'm not a neat freak and I could work there if it were a separate building, away from my house but I couldn't live with the old car, broken electronics, crates and buckets filled with "junk", etc laying around my yard and home.
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Old 04-28-2015, 01:24 AM
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I was thinking this the whole time I was watching the video!

I love her philosophy of letting kids learn by play and like many of her ideas and enthusiasm but there was a lot there that wouldn't work for me since I have mixed ages - and lots of safety regulations to follow! I'm not sure if it was in this video or in another of hers that I looked at after viewing this one but she seems to shrug off the possibility of a child getting hurt in that environment - that it's no big deal; just a part of being a kid, exploring and learning. While I know that's true, I also know that many parents - and licensing - wouldn't necessarily shrug it off and I'd be held liable for any serious injury that happened on my watch. As I watched the boy splashing around in the water in the ditch area and listened to her describe the climbing structure made of rope and how some kids fall through it, I was thinking how much fun it would be for a kid but what a potential nightmare it could be for me as a provider.

I also agree with the others who mentioned the mess and clutter. I'm not a neat freak and I could work there if it were a separate building, away from my house but I couldn't live with the old car, broken electronics, crates and buckets filled with "junk", etc laying around my yard and home.
One can see this video so many different ways. If you look at the aspect of a child's learning and development, it clearly is a terrific place!! IMO topnotch! But yeh, safety issues would make licensing go nutso. And as someone brought up, the boy in his underwear, I can see myself being hauled into court now over suspected abuse. But if we only watched this video(as I did the 1st time) through the eyes of the value of play, this whole place is a goldmine. And for a kid to be let loose with opportunities that they normally wouldn't have at home, they'd be in heaven.
As for the mess, I admit that would be a hard one for me. But perhaps we can take away an idea or 2 from it to use in our own homes.

Last weekend I attended an all-day conference about 'being outdoors'. The trainer discussed risk-taking versus hazards. She said you remove the hazards(broken bottles, nails and all that) and the kids will learn to take risks according to their current abilities(such as climbing that rope structure thingie). I was never very good at letting my owns kids learn by falling and crying and I'm probably worse with others' kids. But it does their self-esteem wonders when they can master something despite the risk. Now if we can only convince dcps and the state of this concept instead of keeping every child in a bubble.
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Old 04-28-2015, 04:43 AM
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I think that the center's success depends on the environment and surrounding culture, as well. These types of places are popular in the artsy college-towns where I grew up. The majority of parents in that area wouldn't blink an eye at the underwear scenario since their children are being raised to explore without limitations. I live in a suburb where the majority of parents prefer sterile environments, school uniforms, and formal education. The children in my area would go to college with backpack leashes if their parents could pull it off, so that much freedom isn't preferred.
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Old 04-28-2015, 07:55 AM
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Wonderful environment for kiddos and someplace I would love to create! I would have loved to have something like that for my own children.

I think she is probably not liscensed, but might run as non-profit as she said they run on very little money.

Liscensing no-no's-the kitchen, the children in underwear, the child running around with a hose, the ditch with water in it, all the ropes, and so many other things.

I think the parents are heavily involved in the program and may have to be there with their children or at least volunter quite a bit. For some reason I'm not sure if there are alot of teachers or outside helpers.

I'm thinking it is very play based with little organized learning. Possibly the only time they come together is at the end for the story? It kind of reminded me of going to a fun place for your kiddos to play but I can't imagine paying for it several times a week. It seems more of a free for all which would be fun but alot of risks with so many children involved.

Now, did I take away ideas-yes! I want to work on getting some of them in place soon. But over all, I can't see it working as a childcare setting that is liscensed with the state.
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Old 04-28-2015, 09:20 AM
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Now, did I take away ideas-yes! I want to work on getting some of them in place soon. But over all, I can't see it working as a childcare setting that is liscensed with the state.
Not to steer this topic too far off course but can you point out some of the specific things you'd love to incorporate? And the question goes for everyone. I saw so many things......sigh.....1 at a time.
So does anyone have a spare gondola laying around? Lol
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Old 04-28-2015, 09:31 AM
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The lending library-but where to put it?

More plants outside and not just in the summer.

The fish pond

I loved the free art area but definetly an outside thing.

The gondala

I would also like to have a wooden boat outside!
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Old 04-28-2015, 10:09 AM
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Not to steer this topic too far off course but can you point out some of the specific things you'd love to incorporate? And the question goes for everyone. I saw so many things......sigh.....1 at a time.
So does anyone have a spare gondola laying around? Lol
I particularly loved the quiet spaces for children. It's something I could create-I have a small group- ages 3 and up. I feel like my current group is craving it as they like sitting under the tables reading books daily. I'd just like something a little cozier for them and my current space is WIDE open.

I've wanted a loft forever and now would LOVE to do it with plexiglass floor, so they children can see underneath them!

All of the outside stuff-loved! I like the milk crates to store loose parts and toys. I liked the real materials vs kid crap that breaks immediately.

I liked that she clearly didn't spend tons of money making it look perfect (even though the amount of 'clutter' did bother me). The kitchen was old and not as functional as they would have liked, etc, but that's what it is. They seem to receive a lot of donations and parent help, which I'm lacking in)

LOVED loved loved the swings!!

I was inspired by her enough to do something (finally) with my screened in porch, which is right off my preschool room. We haven't used it in the 1 1/2 years that I've lived here because it really just needs to be redone--desperately needs powerwashing and screens replaced and we haven't done it yet, which made me reluctant to have the kids use it. BUT, this week my older group and I made it into a nice little gardening center--we have real plants, soil to dig in, weeds, new seeds, water bottles, etc. A huge hit here and really the only inside space that I would want such a mess. We've had it open while we're playing inside the last couple of days and it just feels so nice to be out in the fresh air and playing in dirt, etc, but we also still have access to the inside stuff for when the kids want to play inside.
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Old 04-28-2015, 10:25 AM
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Here's a photo of our new Gardening Center. It's not perfect, it's on a nasty old porch using 1/2 broken tables, but it's here and I'm glad I didn't wait until the porch was all fixed up and pretty to do this. I wouldnt have done it if I hadn't seen the Bev Bos video.
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Old 04-28-2015, 10:41 AM
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I love Bev's program and hate it at the same time!

Love it cause I want one.

Hate it cause it's unrealistic for day care.....dirt play in the pillow section?!
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Old 04-28-2015, 03:38 PM
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I've been thinking about this video all night... I'm so torn between two things...

It's so inspiring to hear Bev speak and just to think of how simple it is to allow children to have independence and control over their day and what materials they use and how they use them. At one point, she was showing a cute little hidden space and said that a child could choose to have a little snack in that space by herself. This sounds so lovely and ideal and what I think it shoud be like, HOWEVER, I am tasked with preparing children for kindergarten. I run a preschool in a college town (lots of professors kids). Most of my children go on to public school.

So, I am responsible to make sure that children are able to follow directions, participate in a group, recognize and can write upper and lower case letters, know their letter sounds, etc etc etc. I help them learn table manners, passing items, pouring milk. I DO run a play-based program and make sure that we're learning all of these things through play, we don't do worksheets or anything, but it's still not as 'ideal' as what she does.

Everyday, I run a small group activity that is teacher led and yes, pretty much the kids have to join me. I make them come to morning meeting and circle time at the end of the program (they all want to come to these things anyways, but when they first start, I sometimes have one that is reluctant and I pretty much just tell them they have to...ha, so they do). I feel like if I didn't plan art activities I have some children that would NEVER do art. They wouldn't learn cutting or gluing skills.

There are all of these things that I feel like I'm responsible for 'teaching' them or at least giving them experiences with because I feel like they should be prepared and confident when going to kindergarten. I would LOVE to just let them make their own choices all the time and encourage such freedom, but I just don't see how it's realistic. I wouldn't have clients if they didn't leave here ready for kindy.

Sorry for my ramble, does anyone else feel this way??
I could have typed this. I have the same expectations, college town, half my clients are professors (one is the dean of a 4 year school). I would not be able to maintain enrollment if I DIDN'T do the things I do. I also feel like with kindergarten being the new 1st grade, there is no leeway in that catch up time. If a child isn't fully prepared entering K, they just fall further and further behind. I have a hard enough time getting parents past the 'play based' portion, and I have had clients look over lesson plans and photos and I have to use wolf language (ooey gooey lady) and point out the learning. Most of the professors get it, thankfully.

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yea the unfenced fish pond alone and the boy in underwear made me scratch my head
my licenser would have a field day with the write ups but we are in a different state so I don't know I didn't really watch the whole thing
Seeing as how I had to get rid of my bird bath, in the front of my yard, that children should not have access to at ALL, EVER. AND the fact that she made sure that I was aware my sand/water table had to be covered between children using it. Yup, pretty sure that I would be dumping that out in her presence.

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I must confess. I did wonder, how would anything be sanitized?
I'm guessing not. Which is probably FANTASTIC for their immune systems, in all honesty.

I have a LOT of her same science items, and agree with the philosophy, it's the putting it into practice I see soooo many issues with.

I am steering to more child led- and by that I drop plop after plop (another ooey gooey lady) until something sparks an interest by the majority and I design our curriculum for the next couple of weeks/until interest fades around that interest.
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Old 04-29-2015, 04:05 AM
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I could have typed this. I have the same expectations, college town, half my clients are professors (one is the dean of a 4 year school). I would not be able to maintain enrollment if I DIDN'T do the things I do. I also feel like with kindergarten being the new 1st grade, there is no leeway in that catch up time. If a child isn't fully prepared entering K, they just fall further and further behind. I have a hard enough time getting parents past the 'play based' portion, and I have had clients look over lesson plans and photos and I have to use wolf language (ooey gooey lady) and point out the learning. Most of the professors get it, thankfully.


I think this is a really interesting area of discussion.

How 'prepared' are children from a play-based school versus traditional preschool setting? Or perhaps this questions is better framed as how does a play-based program help to prepare a child for the school system? I'm intrigued enough to look into this a bit more.

I do a combo of both right now but the pressure comes from me and needing to let go of my expectations of what a preschool looks like. My parents are pretty easy going and like the 'others' I do with the kids which gives me some freedom to experiment.
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Old 04-29-2015, 05:11 AM
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I think this is a really interesting area of discussion.

How 'prepared' are children from a play-based school versus traditional preschool setting? Or perhaps this questions is better framed as how does a play-based program help to prepare a child for the school system? I'm intrigued enough to look into this a bit more.

I do a combo of both right now but the pressure comes from me and needing to let go of my expectations of what a preschool looks like. My parents are pretty easy going and like the 'others' I do with the kids which gives me some freedom to experiment.
I had a very similar philosophy in my daycare when my oldest dd was young. When she started school, I noticed that she struggled with the structure and the more traditional teaching techniques. I started to implement components from both philosophies, so the kids wouldn't be as shell-shocked in a traditional classroom. There just isn't a one-size-fits-all teaching approach, so many students benefit from a variety.
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Old 05-23-2015, 12:55 PM
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Like many that has commented, Bev Bos' center is great and inspiring but hard to implement in a family childcare. I was letting my fantasy run to have a place like hers for quite a few days but realized that it wouldn't be possible.
BUT any play-based program can take away something from her program. How in-tuned she was to the children's developmental needs! Running a place like that would take a lot of time and energy to teach the parents as well so I can see why those parent meetings are so crucial. All those custom made structures were great, truly inspired!

Thanks for sharing!
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Old 05-23-2015, 01:25 PM
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I am watching this video right now. Looks like a lovely place, but no, not realistic for a person's home.

I think that when parent's present play based or other alternative preschools, like Waldorf, it is their responsibility to know the program and what it will and will not do. They need to supplement their own child's education if they plan to send them to a kinder that is in complete opposite of their current preschool environment. They only thing that truly bothers me about alternative preschools is the worry that parents then send their 5 year old to traditional school settings and leave a child there shell shocked. Alternative preschools have many lovely choices but are becoming trendy, more than anything else, and so some parents are not making informative, educated choices on the best fit for their own child.

For instance, my 1st grader is first on the wait list for an expressive arts school where the focus is not mainly academic. There are critics to the school that say academics are not a priority there. The school still seems like a great fit for my gifted, creative child (she has tested gifted, it is not just me saying this). I will be supplementing her education at home so she doesn't lose the interest and ability in things like science, which is taught but not a focus at the expressive arts school. It is my responsibility as a parent to fill in the gaps as I knowingly place my child in an alternative school.
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Old 05-23-2015, 01:28 PM
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Anyone know the staff ratio at a place like Bev's?
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Old 05-23-2015, 01:51 PM
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never mind.....I saw online that you have to be over 2.5 to go there, it is part time only, 2 or 3 days a week for a couple hours a day. So this program is not for the full time working parent unless they have alternative childcare. There is A LOT of parent participation expected. The staff is not in full on kid mode all day long with all that dirt and paint everywhere lol

I think it is a lovely program but no, not realistic at all for the majority of providers and parent needs.

I would love to do more loose parts but it takes time to re organize all that each day and also, it is a safety hazard for babies and toddlers. Safety is also a concern for things like an indoor swing, drills, free art area. Sanitation is a concern for things like soil in the pillow area, open access to the pond and small animals. Can you imagine head to toe filthy kids charging thru your living room every day? It is so fun for kids but not realistic for typical home provider.
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Old 05-23-2015, 06:19 PM
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The meetings are because its a cooperative preschool. I had my son at one for three years and it was the best thing in the world! I actually paid to take my son there while I worked at a different preschool because I preferred him to be there! We parents worked one day a week at the school and attended a once a week meeting. We also had to put on a big fundraiser every year as well as serve on committees! There was a lot to do. I would go to work at the other preschool and drop off my son at the co-op 4 days a week. Once a week, I worked my co-op day. When you say she has helpers- yes! We could do so many amazing things there that couldn't happen in other settings. Why? Because we had a staff there of like 6 adults a day with like 15-20 kids! Granted only 2 were employees and the rest were parents with no ECE, but those parents were extremely invested and involved and received a little ECE at least, in the weekly meetings.

As far as prepping kids for Kindergarten, any ECE person I know thinks state programs and head start are the worst and prepping for school is best done with complete free play and child led everything. Since many parents here read up on the latest ECE practices, they know that there is a disdain by the ECE community for "kindergarten prep" "teacher lead lessons" and the whole teaching to the test and no child left behind etc etc style of teaching. SO, it's not a hard sell at all. The parents here are more the types to pay a LOT for an all out door program where kids play in water and dirt all day and are not ever told to sit down and learn a letter sound or forced to cut out a shape. I like it. lol to each his own, I know, but I believe all of this is truly in the best interest of the children and hope it continues to gain popularity.
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Old 05-23-2015, 09:22 PM
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The meetings are because its a cooperative preschool. I had my son at one for three years and it was the best thing in the world! I actually paid to take my son there while I worked at a different preschool because I preferred him to be there! We parents worked one day a week at the school and attended a once a week meeting. We also had to put on a big fundraiser every year as well as serve on committees! There was a lot to do. I would go to work at the other preschool and drop off my son at the co-op 4 days a week. Once a week, I worked my co-op day. When you say she has helpers- yes! We could do so many amazing things there that couldn't happen in other settings. Why? Because we had a staff there of like 6 adults a day with like 15-20 kids! Granted only 2 were employees and the rest were parents with no ECE, but those parents were extremely invested and involved and received a little ECE at least, in the weekly meetings.

As far as prepping kids for Kindergarten, any ECE person I know thinks state programs and head start are the worst and prepping for school is best done with complete free play and child led everything. Since many parents here read up on the latest ECE practices, they know that there is a disdain by the ECE community for "kindergarten prep" "teacher lead lessons" and the whole teaching to the test and no child left behind etc etc style of teaching. SO, it's not a hard sell at all. The parents here are more the types to pay a LOT for an all out door program where kids play in water and dirt all day and are not ever told to sit down and learn a letter sound or forced to cut out a shape. I like it. lol to each his own, I know, but I believe all of this is truly in the best interest of the children and hope it continues to gain popularity.
I am curious if the your school screens the parents at all? I saw one local co op that does background checks on parents but most do nothing at all. Its like an open door there. That was my worry with local co-ops.....the security factor of me not knowing who my kids where exposed to. I personally would rather have less in the way of play based in order to gain more in the way of security and safety but thats just me as I am very paranoid about adults abusing or negatively influencing my children (language, etc.).

but I do agree that the play based program is more successful with more adult involvement! you still have to clean things, make sure no one drowns or gets hurt, etc. This just isn't possible in many ways with one caregiver, multiple ages down to infants, and long hours that are typical of in-home care. I agree though that play based is gaining in popularity and I am glad of that. I hate when people ask about curriculum for infants, how soon will their kid learn letters and stuff like that.
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Old 05-23-2015, 10:08 PM
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No fingerprinting. That was my first concern too. I had seen how people were in the family childcares and in centers I had worked. And I didn't want my child with some of those people! I was then worried how these parents would be. Well, I could see the program was so much better quality than any others I had worked at. I saw the two staff (director and assistant) split up the inside and outside. Kids are free to go in and out at all times and a parent stays at each area assigned (sand box, play structure, bikes, woodworking, inside art, outside art, library, cooking table, block area, writing center). Then the director walked around the whole outside from area to area and the assistant did the inside. Whenever either went through one of the doors, the other went through another door so there was always a director in sight. There were no phones aloud. And the directors would give parents tidbits of info or model how to be with the children. I am super paranoid because some of the bs I've witnessed working at family childcares and my mind was at ease in the situation. I mean, just imagine there would be like 10 kids max outside and ten inside. One teacher can see whats going on with 10 kids and can see and hear what parents are saying and doing with them. I'm sure it depends how good the director is. They set the tone. Ours was great! Very much like Bev Bos.
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Old 05-23-2015, 10:15 PM
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Oh and forgot to add- we did know who our kids were exposed to. We met with them every week for 2.5 hours for night class/meeting and then worked with them during our once a week shift AND we all hung out together whenever a chance came up lol. We all would become friends. We also had to do extra work days a couple times a year for like 4 hours on a Saturday to fix the school up. Then we also worked for each other whenever anyone was sick or the child was sick so we would have to get another parent to sub- which happened ALL the time. So, we would really do like 2 days a week with the kids. Plus some of us, like me, liked to just go in for fun to be with our kids. So we would talk and talk. We all got to know each other and I came to realize it was all people who were very invested and into being with their child and doing everything they could to do right for them. So, there wasn't any weird bad language or messed up behaviors going on.
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Old 05-24-2015, 02:11 AM
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Sounds amazing! I'm glad both you and your son had that opportunity
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Old 05-24-2015, 08:41 AM
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I am watching this video right now. Looks like a lovely place, but no, not realistic for a person's home.

I think that when parent's present play based or other alternative preschools, like Waldorf, it is their responsibility to know the program and what it will and will not do. They need to supplement their own child's education if they plan to send them to a kinder that is in complete opposite of their current preschool environment. They only thing that truly bothers me about alternative preschools is the worry that parents then send their 5 year old to traditional school settings and leave a child there shell shocked. Alternative preschools have many lovely choices but are becoming trendy, more than anything else, and so some parents are not making informative, educated choices on the best fit for their own child.

For instance, my 1st grader is first on the wait list for an expressive arts school where the focus is not mainly academic. There are critics to the school that say academics are not a priority there. The school still seems like a great fit for my gifted, creative child (she has tested gifted, it is not just me saying this). I will be supplementing her education at home so she doesn't lose the interest and ability in things like science, which is taught but not a focus at the expressive arts school. It is my responsibility as a parent to fill in the gaps as I knowingly place my child in an alternative school.
I feel like most children who go to a school like this would most likely go to an alternative school. There are so many project based charter schools these days.
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Old 05-24-2015, 03:39 PM
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There was a guest speaker from my class that taught at a emergent curriculum preschool (pricey preschool might I add), their philosophy was similar to play-based and was asked if we want to prepare children for kinder, wouldn't it be better to start them off in a more traditional classroom setting? He replied with if we know that children learn best through play, then he would rather keep them from the traditional academics as long as possible. What a great answer!

I do wondering how the children adjust to kinder after having such freedom.
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Old 05-24-2015, 07:45 PM
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While I saw many things that would not fly with licensing I also got many new ideas. the one thing she said was ever changing. That does not mean all the old stays and more is added. I need to remember that. I have been wanting some sort of curtain and never thought of a shower curtain. I think we will be having some sort of stage.

I get more ideas than I can get done I need to remember she said it happened over 10 years all the changes she pointed out.

I do leave the art stuff out for the most part and it works well. ( most of the time) Paint has been moved the 16 month painted the glass door that was perfect I left it for a few days but it could have been the wall or a coat. So he can paint but I want to know when and that everyone really did put on a smock. Work in progress.
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Old 05-24-2015, 09:40 PM
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There was a guest speaker from my class that taught at a emergent curriculum preschool (pricey preschool might I add), their philosophy was similar to play-based and was asked if we want to prepare children for kinder, wouldn't it be better to start them off in a more traditional classroom setting? He replied with if we know that children learn best through play, then he would rather keep them from the traditional academics as long as possible. What a great answer!

I do wondering how the children adjust to kinder after having such freedom.
I recently completed a masters degree in early childhood special education. Although parents want to see academics in preschool, current research does not support academic instruction in preschool. The little ones learn best through play.

http://educationnext.org/much-too-early/

They will do well in Kindergarten if they had an enriching/supportive environment, play based learning opportunities, and learned how to get along with peers.
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Old 05-26-2015, 02:07 PM
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Unhappy How on earth is she licenced

I want to make one for my community but where is the info about how she is licenced???? There is no way my licencing officer would approve.
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Old 05-26-2015, 04:15 PM
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What do you think isn't licensed about it? It's the same as the one I went to and that was licensed. She's in CA. It goes by title 22 licensing regs. look it up... is it the water- its supervised at all times... what is the part you are thinking isn't going to pass?
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Old 05-26-2015, 08:02 PM
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It would be hard for me to have that kind of environment because the child care space is also my family's living space. But when I watch videos like this I try to figure out how to do things in a way that works for me, rather than just write it all off under "I can't do it just like that so I can't do any of it." (Not that anyone here has that attitude, but I hear it all the time around me.)
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Old 05-29-2015, 01:35 PM
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My officer would not pass ungated stairs, the pond, the climbers, the nets up top, etc. However the parents are there as well , correct?? Where is this preschool located? I am sure my area has different standards
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Old 05-29-2015, 04:08 PM
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I recently completed a masters degree in early childhood special education. Although parents want to see academics in preschool, current research does not support academic instruction in preschool. The little ones learn best through play.

http://educationnext.org/much-too-early/

They will do well in Kindergarten if they had an enriching/supportive environment, play based learning opportunities, and learned how to get along with peers.
Thanks speed mommy for the article reference. Interesting read for both sides of the argument.
Good to know the children adjusts well to kindergarten!
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Old 05-29-2015, 04:09 PM
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My officer would not pass ungated stairs, the pond, the climbers, the nets up top, etc. However the parents are there as well , correct?? Where is this preschool located? I am sure my area has different standards
It's located in Roseville, CA
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Old 05-29-2015, 05:08 PM
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It's located in Roseville, CA
I find the fact that it's in CA hard to believe. I'm CA and no way the pond inside would pass. We can't even have "water features" like water fountains. I know a provider who had a fountain in her fenced in front yard. The fence was short (about 4") and only fenced off the grass portion. Clients never stepped foot on it, they walked up the driveway to the front door which is not in the fenced in part. Her analyst saw it and gave her a citation because the gate was only latched but not locked (like with a padlock) and they said that a child could potentially open the gate and get inside. They gave her such a hard time about it even after adding a pad-lock that she ended up taking the water out and just filled it with rocks.
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Old 05-29-2015, 07:37 PM
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I find the fact that it's in CA hard to believe. I'm CA and no way the pond inside would pass. We can't even have "water features" like water fountains. I know a provider who had a fountain in her fenced in front yard. The fence was short (about 4") and only fenced off the grass portion. Clients never stepped foot on it, they walked up the driveway to the front door which is not in the fenced in part. Her analyst saw it and gave her a citation because the gate was only latched but not locked (like with a padlock) and they said that a child could potentially open the gate and get inside. They gave her such a hard time about it even after adding a pad-lock that she ended up taking the water out and just filled it with rocks.
She is in Ca. Not far from me and I know her personally. I haven't watched the video posted, but I know the "indoor ecosystem" (pond) has been covered with chicken wire due to licensing regs. but it is still there and fully functioning.
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Old 05-30-2015, 10:02 PM
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Default so many ideas...!

I LOVE THIS! And it will be the perfect philosophy for my son who is a bit of a wild child. But, at the same time, that is my question. He is wild...So, how do they handle disagreements between children?

How do they handle discipline? Children are not always perfect. Does it turn into "little boy justice" and let them duke it out? Idk if that would work...

Also somebody said they leave art supplies out. How does that work? Are there rules?

Somebody was also posting about an alternative learning environment that their child was in, how did they operate?

Any feedback is appreciated!! I really want to make this work for us
Thank you.
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Old 05-31-2015, 01:25 AM
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http://www.rosevillecp.org/faq/
This is the link to the 'FAQ' page on the website of the cooperative preschool the video is about. This addresses guidance and school readiness... If you want to find a school like this in your area, maybe you could google 'cooperative preschool' and the name of your town... I'm sure there will be no duking it out children will be supervised and guided at all times just like a center that doesn't have a parent volunteer component. I'd love to hear if you found something!
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Old 05-31-2015, 09:09 AM
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She is in Ca. Not far from me and I know her personally. I haven't watched the video posted, but I know the "indoor ecosystem" (pond) has been covered with chicken wire due to licensing regs. but it is still there and fully functioning.
The chicken wire over it makes sense since any "body of water" has to be made "inaccessible to children". I was thinking about the video and the pond over the last few days and thought maybe the video might have been an older video which was made before all of our stricter regulations came into place.

I do love a lot of other features her program has. I love that it's developmentally appropriate, that the children have a multitude of opportunities for free exploration, that it's a very natural environment and that it's play based.

It's a little too cluttered for me and hard on my eyes but I think the program is a fantastic one. Makes me wish for more space and more stuff
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Old 05-31-2015, 10:19 AM
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I think this is a really interesting area of discussion.

How 'prepared' are children from a play-based school versus traditional preschool setting? Or perhaps this questions is better framed as how does a play-based program help to prepare a child for the school system? I'm intrigued enough to look into this a bit more.

I do a combo of both right now but the pressure comes from me and needing to let go of my expectations of what a preschool looks like. My parents are pretty easy going and like the 'others' I do with the kids which gives me some freedom to experiment.


I think the key is balance. In some of the video my anxiety went up because it looked a bit dirty and overcrowded in some areas with all the materials (could have just been camera angles that make the place look smaller and darker) and they didn't talk much about how they discipline as far as setting rules and expectations (since they would just change where they had 'gathering' time to let children finish with the blocks). A lot of this is ideal but at the same time most public kindergartens and elementary schools don't work this way and I can see many children being in for a rude awakening when the schools are all usually teacher lead. And as many others have mentioned, most state licensing departments would not allow most of the things shown in the video (standing water, the open computers, the ditch, ect.).

It's also most likely a co-op since it seems the parents are always present in the class room. While most child development experts would say that is ideal as well, most parents have solid work schedules and cannot be active in the class room everyday; which could make those children feel left out when they see other parents all the time (tough most co-ops require a certain amount of time each week). Also, while the parents talk about the "community" aspect of connecting with other parents, in a co-ops there tends to be a lot of judgement. I did student teaching at a church based co-op and just as with any school there was always 'that kid' that always acted up in class that the other parents wouldn't want their kid playing with or everyone talking about behind their back "She just doesn't discipline him enough", "That kid needs a spanking","I'd never let my kid get away with that", ect.

I plan on when I open mine for it to mostly be play-based through out the day but to have maybe a 1/2 hour to an hour a day of what I call "sit down" preschool (what most call "traditional preschool"), mostly just doing a structured group activity (group reading; science project, social/life skills, quick review of numbers, ABCs, and colors).
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Old 05-31-2015, 05:44 PM
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A lot of this is ideal but at the same time most public kindergartens and elementary schools don't work this way and I can see many children being in for a rude awakening when the schools are all usually teacher lead.
I was thinking about this part particularly because it came up in my own life. I am more play-based and child led and way less strict when it comes to certain things. For example during morning meeting (circle time) I don't mind whether the children sit, lie down, fidget or use a chair if they prefer as long as they aren't disturbing the other kids or the activity. I've always been this way and if a child loses interest in what we are doing I move on or let the child move on to another activity. I've done this for so long that my own kids are used to it.

My son goes to a preschool 2 days a week for 4 hours as a way for him to get more acclimated to the more rigorous structure of transitional kinder which he will be starting next fall. One of his teachers (fantastic program by the way, and religious based) pulled me aside to talk to me about a concern ... that he wouldn't sit criss-cross style. I couldn't help but laugh. I had to explain that he doesn't ever have to sit like that when I do activities and I explained why (that they really aren't ready to sit in any one position for a period of time) but I told her that I would talk to him and work on it at home so that he would know that at "school" it was an expectation.

I mean really, the issue is that my kid won't sit criss-cross apple sauce? Duh, he's 4. Be happy that he doesn't mess with the other kids during circle time
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Old 05-31-2015, 06:34 PM
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This program is VERY expensive. If you break the calendar down and look at the total number of hours the kids are there per week over the weeks they are actually open it's a fraction of the hours kids are normally in care.

They have 2.5 hours two or three times a week for about 32 weeks. The hourly rate is VERY high AND the parents have to attend one day per week for their kids session PLUS have many meetings, voluntary work weekends, donations to their auctions, clean up days etc. They have SO many adults there every session.

Of course your kid can paint themselves, swing when they want, climb, play with small pieces when there are a TON of adults to host them AND the cost is SO high.

From what I can see they are in session about a month a year in comparison to a full time daycare kid who attends 10 hour days all year around. By the first week of February the full time kid would be in daycare the same number of hours as a Bev kid spends all school year.

It's about $10.50 an hour for the three day a week kids and about $12 an hour for the two day a week kids IF the parent is onsite one day a week and does a TON of off school volunteering.

If the parent doesn't want to work for free it's nearly double that hourly rate.

The parents who work only have a few hours of coverage a week. They have to pay a super high rate for Bevs and pay for full time daycare if they work.

It looks like a wonderful experience but I can't see where a fraction of it is applicable to home child care. We can't command an hourly rate of 10 to 24 bucks an hour and be open an average of a few weeks a year.

Bev hasn't franchised. Why? That model would be nearly impossible to replicate in any normal child care setting.

I don't see it as any different than comparing it to an amusement park experience. It's just way more expensive.

I would LOVE for my kid to have an experience like that but I could only afford it as I could to send him to six flags or disney. It's just too expensive for average people.
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Old 05-31-2015, 07:26 PM
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Originally Posted by nannyde View Post
This program is VERY expensive. If you break the calendar down and look at the total number of hours the kids are there per week over the weeks they are actually open it's a fraction of the hours kids are normally in care.

They have 2.5 hours two or three times a week for about 32 weeks. The hourly rate is VERY high AND the parents have to attend one day per week for their kids session PLUS have many meetings, voluntary work weekends, donations to their auctions, clean up days etc. They have SO many adults there every session.

Of course your kid can paint themselves, swing when they want, climb, play with small pieces when there are a TON of adults to host them AND the cost is SO high.

From what I can see they are in session about a month a year in comparbyison to a full time daycare kid who attends 10 hour days all year around. By the first week of February the full time kid would be in daycare the same number of hours as a Bev kid spends all school year.

It's about $10.50 an hour for the three day a week kids and about $12 an hour for the two day a week kids IF the parent is onsite one day a week and does a TON of off school volunteering.

If the parent doesn't want to work for free it's nearly double that hourly rate.

The parents who work only have a few hours of coverage a week. They have to pay a super high rate for Bevs and pay for full time daycare if they work.

It looks like a wonderful experience but I can't see where a fraction of it is applicable to home child care. We can't command an hourly rate of 10 to 24 bucks an hour and be open an average of a few weeks a year.

Bev hasn't franchised. Why? That model would be nearly impossible to replicate in any normal child care setting.

I don't see it as any different than comparing it to an amusement park experience. It's just way more expensive.

I would LOVE for my kid to have an experience like that but I could only afford it as I could to send him to six flags or disney. It's just too expensive for average people.
The amusement park description hits it on the nose. We have a children's museum here that made me think of this video. It's called the museum of curiosity here in ut and you get an over crowded version of bevs experience there. Super fun
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Old 05-31-2015, 08:36 PM
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It looks like a small child's version of heaven!

In my state, if you provide care for less than 4 hours a day, there is no licensing. I'm sure that's what this preschool (as all of the 1/2 day programs around me) falls into.

My son just finished kindergarten. He had several students in his class that attended a local preschool co-op that operated much like this one. A few students came from the local Reggio Emilio, project based, but all child-led, preschool. Some (like my son), came from mixed age, chiefly play based but not quite as wild and free, environments. And still others did full day, 7+ hours of traditional preK with worksheets and all. Somehow, they all meshed together in kindergarten, and by the end of the year, you couldn't really tell who had had what kind of preschool experience.
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Old 05-31-2015, 11:44 PM
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This is in CA and it is licensed. You can do this, people. You can. Lol Forcing young children to sit in a circle and learn 123 ABC and sit at a desk and color in a photocopy of a dog and say 'd is for dog' is pointless and is just simply not developmentally appropriate. This, what they do in this place, is how they learn. No sitting in a circle is going to teach them the way these experiences will. You can and should be doing these things. When you do a 'sensory bin' you are making a start towards this. And that's good. But if you take it up a notch, that's great. And, I'm sure in 20 years you will be. Right now, you say 'no no no way'. Just like 20 years ago you said no way would you do this silly messy sensory bin idea. This is real and its what these kids need. It is licensed and you can do it. There are 4 co-ops like this within 20 miles of me. There are non-coops near me doing these things. There are family childcares near me doing these things. All are lisenced. Here in CA, we have to be. Its so frustrating reading these comments. Yes, they are licensed. Yes, it is good for the kids. Yes, the children adjust well to Kindergarten. Yes, it is feasible to do these activities and make these environments. Omg. I get not wanting this craziness all over your house. I get it. But don't act like its some weird fringe movement. This is how kids learn best (and function best if you want to play the whole 'I'm not a teacher, i'm a daycare provider' thing).
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Old 06-01-2015, 05:00 AM
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nannyde nannyde is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
This is in CA and it is licensed. You can do this, people. You can. Lol Forcing young children to sit in a circle and learn 123 ABC and sit at a desk and color in a photocopy of a dog and say 'd is for dog' is pointless and is just simply not developmentally appropriate. This, what they do in this place, is how they learn. No sitting in a circle is going to teach them the way these experiences will. You can and should be doing these things. When you do a 'sensory bin' you are making a start towards this. And that's good. But if you take it up a notch, that's great. And, I'm sure in 20 years you will be. Right now, you say 'no no no way'. Just like 20 years ago you said no way would you do this silly messy sensory bin idea. This is real and its what these kids need. It is licensed and you can do it. There are 4 co-ops like this within 20 miles of me. There are non-coops near me doing these things. There are family childcares near me doing these things. All are lisenced. Here in CA, we have to be. Its so frustrating reading these comments. Yes, they are licensed. Yes, it is good for the kids. Yes, the children adjust well to Kindergarten. Yes, it is feasible to do these activities and make these environments. Omg. I get not wanting this craziness all over your house. I get it. But don't act like its some weird fringe movement. This is how kids learn best (and function best if you want to play the whole 'I'm not a teacher, i'm a daycare provider' thing).
I don't want to run a business with parents being half or a third of the caretakers every session. I don't want to run a business where I don't serve meals. I don't want to find clients that can pay $10 to $24 an hour. I don't want to maintain a property that requires parents to work by maintaining it and cleaning it up. I don't want to do parent meetings for three hour stretches weekly or monthly.

I don't want to find clients who only need 5 to 7 hours of care a week for 32/33 weeks a year. Why are you frustrated hearing the responses? I don't know too many providers who could pull off this model. It takes a lot of land, a ton of high maintenance infrastructure. A huge supply fee for each family etc.

Bev has been doing this for a LONG time and hasn't franchised. She sells her theory but to my knowledge she doesn't have multiple sites. You say kids SHOULD be doing this but it can't be replicated in a 50 hour daycare week with one adult per six kids.

Do you GET that this is a play experience for a few hours a week for approximately 7.5 months a year?

It's not child care. It's really awesome play in a REALLY awesome environment with a bunch of mommies there. The two day a week kids have mommy there half the time they are there. The three day a week kids have mommy there one of three days.

And... Bev has been doing this for a long time. Where is her longitudinal research that says that kids who attend her program 5 to 7.5 hours a week for a total of 32 weeks a year for a couple of years score any higher in ANY measurable way in reading, math, science, social studies, and languages?

Where's her research to show it has any lasting impact on outcomes? If compared to their economic counterparts, I can't see where these REALLY small exposures for a couple of years makes any lasting impact.

Nobody is saying it's not cool and super fun for the kids. Your saying this is what we should be doing doesn't include how to fund it. If it were easily funded Ms Bev would have many many sites.
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Old 06-01-2015, 09:48 AM
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I wouldnt call what she is doing daycare. I would say that she is hosting super awesome playdates. Many parents attend and it is for short periods. A working parent would not be getting daycare from this scenario. A stay at home parent would love the fact that they can go to school too and socialize with other parents. sounds like playdates to me. I am sure the kids have a blast and are learning, no arguments there, but I dont feel this is realistic for a home daycare to replicate in full. Here a single provider can have 10 to 12 kids. There is no way that one provider can supervise water play, free access to art, etc. while also having kids there for 10 hours a day with age range for babies to 5 years old plus serving meals. I do think there is some tips and inspiration to gain from the video but not a replication of her set up. Here there wouldnt be a demand for a few hours a day play program where parents have to be super involved and it would cost for a single child what you would pay a nanny. There are co ops in my area but all, that I know of, offer full day daycare and require minimal parent involvement.....like an hour a week. Now being from CA, I can tell you that there is a demand there. There is a high demand alternative programs and people are willing to pay for it so it doesnt surprise me at all that this is based in CA. I am currently in the midwest and no, there wouldnt be even close the interest here. Many people want to be as mainstream as possible......a free for all play based program that you have to pay high high fees for would not find a client base here in my opinion.
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