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  #1  
Old 09-16-2016, 02:16 PM
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Default Are You a "Teacher"

Just read this on another site.

The (Federal) Office of Child Care (OCC) has asked the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) to re-define child care workers (and preschool teachers, teacher assistants, education administrators) as "teachers". The OCC requested this official change "emphasizing in their rationale new changes in the CCDBG legislation, increased education of these positions and the professionalism of the workforce." But the BLS has denied the request. Now the OCC is appealing and there is a comment period that ends September 20th.

It sounds to me like if the OCC gets this new definition, child care workers will need to have the same degree as teachers. That will seriously decrease the number of qualified workers, not to mention raise prices.

Here are their talking points:

 The child care worker classification should be removed from the service occupations. All ECE teaching classifications should be under education.
 The job title should be early childhood teacher.
 The US Department of Health and Human Services is proposing that early childhood teacher have two categories, birth to three, three to kindergarten. (Another potential option might also be birth to kindergarten for those working with mixed age groups.) Teachers of older aged children are classified into categories by age so early childhood teachers should be classified similarly.
 Child care and education cannot be separated.
 The early care and education field does not see itself in the current categories. They see themselves as teachers and respond accordingly in surveys already being conducted by the federal government on these occupations.
 This change will allow the federal government to gather more accurate statistics that separate Kindergarten and Prekindergarten teachers in school settings.
 Current data is very difficult for researchers and policy makers and creates challenges for states who want annual data that is reflective of the early care and education sector. Most do not have resources to do regular salary surveys or do not have registries that encompass the whole workforce.



You can make comments by sending an email to

soc@bls.gov with "2018 SOC" in the subject line

You can read the entire statement here:

https://first5fundametals.app.box.co...aiz6nrfjeif4d0
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  #2  
Old 09-16-2016, 02:22 PM
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Surely this is just to change the nomenclature so communities/employers/government understand the legitimate work we're all doing and the skills we're bringing to the job. Assistants/aides don't always need to have or be working toward a degree, do they? Requiring a degree would price a huge number of families out of child care. The care providers would have to jack their fees way up in order to cover the courses for several years.
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Old 09-16-2016, 02:22 PM
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Thanks for sharing. I'm not a teacher, I don't want to be a teacher, and I don't want my child under 4 or 5 years old to be in the care of a teacher. I want my child in a home like environment, and so do my clients. This trend toward formal education for babies is upsetting.
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Old 09-16-2016, 02:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leigh View Post
I'm not a teacher, I don't want to be a teacher, and I don't want my child under 4 or 5 years old to be in the care of a teacher. I want my child in a home like environment, and so do my clients. This trend toward formal education for babies is upsetting.
I'm from an unschooling family and we do Montessori at home with our child, from infancy. It's wrong to think "home" and "school" are starkly divided, and "parent" and "teacher" are just as starkly divided. It's wrong to spend the early years distracting your kids with noisy toys and TV, and when they reach age 5 turn your kids over to a school system and tune out. It's wrong to discourage kids from learning by equating "learning" with "workbooks, lectures, desks." Home is where education happens. Every adult who guides a child's learning process is a teacher. And an adult who teaches at a child is no teacher at all.

I'm sure that's not what your home is like, Leigh, but I dislike the popular perspective on home vs. school.
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Old 09-16-2016, 02:31 PM
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Nothing surprising about this at all.

QRIS anyone?!?! That is the whole point.... to require providers to ready the kids for school. To educate them.

Slowly most state rules and regulations are focusing more and more on EDUCATION components and less on care components.

Many states no longer list child care under the Department of Health and Human Services but instead redefined it to meet the requirements to be listed under the Department of Education.

This change is coming for everyone sooner or later.
it started off as "optional"
then required ONLY IF you do x, y or z
and soon it WILL be mandatory. for all.
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  #6  
Old 09-16-2016, 02:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Pestle View Post
Surely this is just to change the nomenclature so communities/employers/government understand the legitimate work we're all doing and the skills we're bringing to the job. Assistants/aides don't always need to have or be working toward a degree, do they? J***Requiring a degree would price a huge number of families out of child care.**** The care providers would have to jack their fees way up in order to cover the courses for several years.
*emphasis mine. YES!! You know what happens when day care employees finally get a degree?! They LEAVE because they can't pay off student loans making $9 an hour.
Until they address how providers are going to make the amount of money necessary to fund the degree, they are creating a bad situation.
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Old 09-16-2016, 02:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Pestle View Post
I'm from an unschooling family and we do Montessori at home with our child, from infancy. It's wrong to think "home" and "school" are starkly divided, and "parent" and "teacher" are just as starkly divided. It's wrong to spend the early years distracting your kids with noisy toys and TV, and when they reach age 5 turn your kids over to a school system and tune out. It's wrong to discourage kids from learning by equating "learning" with "workbooks, lectures, desks." Home is where education happens. Every adult who guides a child's learning process is a teacher. And an adult who teaches at a child is no teacher at all.

I'm sure that's not what your home is like, Leigh, but I dislike the popular perspective on home vs. school.
I totally agree. When I first started family child care I didn't like the term Teacher because I felt that what I do is so much more than teaching. But considering how teachers get so little respect, early childhood teachers less, and family child care providers least of all, I've started calling myself an Early Childhood Educator.

I heard the term Educarer at a workshop and if I were Queen of the Universe I'd make everyone use that term. But I'm still waiting for my coronation.
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Old 09-16-2016, 02:51 PM
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On the other side of things, it bugs the heck out of me that 20 yr olds with 2 year degrees are called Teachers just like my husband and me, who have 4 year degrees. Other professions have titles that indicate degree of education (CNA vs RN for nursing, RDA vs DDS for dentistry, etc) I think the field of education should have similar designations. JMO...
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Old 09-16-2016, 02:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pestle View Post
I'm from an unschooling family and we do Montessori at home with our child, from infancy. It's wrong to think "home" and "school" are starkly divided, and "parent" and "teacher" are just as starkly divided. It's wrong to spend the early years distracting your kids with noisy toys and TV, and when they reach age 5 turn your kids over to a school system and tune out. It's wrong to discourage kids from learning by equating "learning" with "workbooks, lectures, desks." Home is where education happens. Every adult who guides a child's learning process is a teacher. And an adult who teaches at a child is no teacher at all.

I'm sure that's not what your home is like, Leigh, but I dislike the popular perspective on home vs. school.
No, my home is not like that. My home is a place where a child is nurtured, plays, and discovers things on their own. I do think that home and school are divided and that with the ridiculous expectations that the federal government wants to put on the under 5 set, that it should stay that way. Curriculum for a 6 month old is the most ridiculous thing I could imagine. I do nurture learning, I do, but I do NOT ever want to be classed as a teacher, nor can I see ANY benefit to it. It just opens my occupation up to more regulation and more demands of forcing kids into what they're not ready for.

I DO teach my kids, on THEIR terms. I don't require that they're doing anything by a certain age. When they government considers us teachers, it WILL be workbooks, lectures, and desks. These legislators have NO idea of how a child develops nor about how detrimental it is for kids to be forced to learn in such ways.

That said, I do believe that ECE is largely the job of the parent. I teach my own child, and it's fun for him. When daycare kids ask about something, I teach them about it. I give them tools to discover for themselves.

In the end, though, my job is to keep kids safe and to nurture. It's what my parents want, and it's what I wanted for my own child when I used daycare. I don't like the idea of planned curriculum for kids under Kindergarten, I don't feel it's appropriate.
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Old 09-16-2016, 02:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pestle View Post
I'm from an unschooling family and we do Montessori at home with our child, from infancy. It's wrong to think "home" and "school" are starkly divided, and "parent" and "teacher" are just as starkly divided. It's wrong to spend the early years distracting your kids with noisy toys and TV, and when they reach age 5 turn your kids over to a school system and tune out. It's wrong to discourage kids from learning by equating "learning" with "workbooks, lectures, desks." Home is where education happens. Every adult who guides a child's learning process is a teacher. And an adult who teaches at a child is no teacher at all.

I'm sure that's not what your home is like, Leigh, but I dislike the popular perspective on home vs. school.
You and I are very similar lol... I homeschooled (much of it unschooled/Eclectic) and I am Montessori in nature for my babies ( yep inc the floor beds)
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Old 09-16-2016, 03:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Play Care View Post
*emphasis mine. YES!! You know what happens when day care employees finally get a degree?! They LEAVE because they can't pay off student loans making $9 an hour.
Until they address how providers are going to make the amount of money necessary to fund the degree, they are creating a bad situation.
Many of the college courses I took to earn my degree were out of pocket expenses I paid for. myself but many of them were paid for by my area child care QRIS program.

It was incentive to enroll. I was monetarily rewarded for completion as well.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AmyKidsCo View Post
On the other side of things, it bugs the heck out of me that 20 yr olds with 2 year degrees are called Teachers just like my husband and me, who have 4 year degrees. Other professions have titles that indicate degree of education (CNA vs RN for nursing, RDA vs DDS for dentistry, etc) I think the field of education should have similar designations. JMO...
totally agree!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leigh View Post
I don't like the idea of planned curriculum for kids under Kindergarten, I don't feel it's appropriate.
lol! I have to have written and planned curriculum covering all indicators of progress/learning domains (including assessments) for infants.
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Old 09-16-2016, 05:43 PM
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Many of the college courses I took to earn my degree were out of pocket expenses I paid for. myself but many of them were paid for by my area child care QRIS program.

It was incentive to enroll. I was monetarily rewarded for completion as well.




totally agree!



lol! I have to have written and planned curriculum covering all indicators of progress/learning domains (including assessments) for infants.
I'd hate that! I do work hard to challenge my kids-I have a therapist who I work with on emotional issues, I have a Physical therapist here twice a week, a home health nurse, birth to three, Occupational therapist and feeding and speech therapy here, too. I don't ever let a kid "slip through the cracks" here. The kids do learn here to do their best always, but I hate the government setting those limits for kids-they develop at their own pace, and that's how it should be. Our entire day is curriculum here, IMO. A walk to the park can be a science lesson, a game can be a math lesson, a book can be a lesson in philosophy. I will never support the government requiring standards for kids under kindergarten level. They all seem to get there on their own.
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Old 09-16-2016, 06:39 PM
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I'd hate that! I do work hard to challenge my kids-I have a therapist who I work with on emotional issues, I have a Physical therapist here twice a week, a home health nurse, birth to three, Occupational therapist and feeding and speech therapy here, too. I don't ever let a kid "slip through the cracks" here. The kids do learn here to do their best always, but I hate the government setting those limits for kids-they develop at their own pace, and that's how it should be. Our entire day is curriculum here, IMO. A walk to the park can be a science lesson, a game can be a math lesson, a book can be a lesson in philosophy. I will never support the government requiring standards for kids under kindergarten level. They all seem to get there on their own.

The day just might come when kids will be required to be in school by age 2.
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Old 09-16-2016, 06:48 PM
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I believe that is what you would write in as the curriculum- the care giving interactions you mentioned. You would plan to read books with goals of developing social domain, giving the opportunity to learn language, concepts, etc. You would record what you observed to indicate a need for this activity (child has been observed reaching for books- showing an interest, etc). You would plan which books you would have available and why (you wouldn't have the lord of the rings out for Baby). You would note and later record what Baby's response was- she smiled and batted at the book, looking me in the eye indicating social development. ... Stuff like that. You don't have to make a paint by numbers activity or something. That's how I was taught to plan curriculum. But I don't have experience with any mandated forms so Idk if they force what your curriculum is... Do they force it to be academic?
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Old 09-16-2016, 06:56 PM
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I mean, I mentioned books so now it sounds academic! But, any normal care giving activities can be planned curriculum. Like the walk to the park example. Who: Johnny. Domain: Cognitive. Goals: Start forming questions and looking for answers, scientific processes. Why: He was observed talking about ants that were seen at home. He was curious and showed an interest in them. He often prefers to sit with trains and cars- this is a good opportunity to reinforce a new interest. What questions will I ask to facilitate: Johnny, where do you think the ants live? etc etc. Observations from activity: Johnny said, "I wonder if ants can eat each other?" and he watched them with a magnifying glass. He agreed to research more at the library next week.... etc etc
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Old 09-17-2016, 03:05 AM
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But CalCare, while that all sounds great, look at how much time it takes out of a caregiver's day. Or out of their own free time spent nurturing their own families. We could spend all of our days doing those things, taking pictures of our activities, writing out dcf's notes/newsletters about the activities we've done OR we could spend half our day writing down step by step what we're doing, why we're doing it, what each and every child is learning/needs/wants from each and every activity. And the dcks are left to their own devices. It all boils down to so much time away from the care of the kids themselves.
How does a provider do it all??? Especially when a lot of us are doing it by ourselves??
All of my own kids turned out well. I do the same with all my dcks, that I did for them. I find little opportunities all day long to ask questions, let them ask questions, observe, read, etc., etc. But to sit there and break it all down into steps.....I don't know. It all seems overwhelming and a bit much.
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Old 09-17-2016, 05:15 AM
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Josie, you do it the same way every unschooling parent does it--you study how children learn, develop your own philosophy of early education, ensure that the environment facilitates that education, come up with a loose plan ahead of time, observe while the learning takes place, jot down whatever notes you need at the moment, and then translate it into language the school system will accept. You're probably already doing a lot of that right now, but yes, it takes practice to get comfortable jumping through all the gov't hoops. Researching homeschooling family blogs will probably help.
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Old 09-17-2016, 06:29 AM
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I agree, it takes a extra time, and for what? And how can one person do it all? I don't know. But I just don't agree with the notion that planning a curriculum is awful and even absurd for babies- because, really, all it means is that you are making a few plans in the best interest of the child. Where people get messed up, I think, is believing the word "curriculum" means academics. "Curriculum" really means care giving activities at these young ages- and "curriculum planning" means doing it consciously. And of course, planning the environment conscientiously as well - not constantly asking questions and directing things. I'm all about the free play. But I can lesson plan it and facilitate it through an intentional environment.

At the same time, I don't have 5 children M-F, 6 AM to 6 PM. I don't know how someone could fit their planning in when they have a 12 hour work day and no breaks and no help :/ It's easy to say what we would do if we were in a position, quite another to actually do it, when in that position! I just agree with the idea of thinking ahead and planning. It keeps me focused and gets me to do things that wouldn't otherwise get done. Now should that method be mandatory - and therefore we then call child care providers "teachers" because they write down lesson plans? Idk. I feel like I was exposed to the best of both worlds because as I was taking my ECE classes I had my first son, we went to a co-op like Bev Bos'. One director was a by the book, curriculum developer (she was formerly the director of the college ECE program) and the other "assistant" director was completely free, emergent curriculum, daily to the point she could hardly stand to have the season written down in the planner because that was too much teacher directing lessons! After three years there as the chair of the children's curriculum committee, in the end, I guess, I became some of each style. So, I like the idea of having a plan, but making it completely child centered/initiated. And, I feel like if I am doing all this, and I have years of experience and education in this, then yes, I am a "teacher".
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Old 09-17-2016, 06:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
Nothing surprising about this at all.

QRIS anyone?!?! That is the whole point.... to require providers to ready the kids for school. To educate them.

Slowly most state rules and regulations are focusing more and more on EDUCATION components and less on care components.

Many states no longer list child care under the Department of Health and Human Services but instead redefined it to meet the requirements to be listed under the Department of Education.

This change is coming for everyone sooner or later.
it started off as "optional"
then required ONLY IF you do x, y or z
and soon it WILL be mandatory. for all.
I agree! Just got a mass email this week wanting my thoughts on what OP posted....Although the masses "get it", it doesn't mean I or anyone else "agrees with it". You are EXACTLY right.....It is only a matter of time till it is mandatory for ALL....At my age, I am in FCC for the long haul, it is who I am and have been and will continue to be but I would NOT encourage anyone to enter the child care field. Actually, I have entertained the thought of quitting many times over the past few years, but I have invested too much into my child care program.??
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Old 09-17-2016, 06:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Play Care View Post
*emphasis mine. YES!! You know what happens when day care employees finally get a degree?! They LEAVE because they can't pay off student loans making $9 an hour.
Until they address how providers are going to make the amount of money necessary to fund the degree, they are creating a bad situation.
As QRIS reared it's ugly head in my state many years ago, the state made funding possible for providers to obtain ECE degrees, CDAs, etc....I knew this "free education/money" would lead to something down the road. While I am thankful I took advantage of this funding and received my degree and CDA along with other beneficial training, I still do not agree with many of the changes that have happened and are happening and will happen. I do not have, nor did I ever have student loans but as funding has decreased, providers today may have student loans if they are forced to obtain college education.
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Old 09-17-2016, 07:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CalCare View Post
I agree, it takes a extra time, and for what? And how can one person do it all? I don't know. But I just don't agree with the notion that planning a curriculum is awful and even absurd for babies- because, really, all it means is that you are making a few plans in the best interest of the child. Where people get messed up, I think, is believing the word "curriculum" means academics. "Curriculum" really means care giving activities at these young ages- and "curriculum planning" means doing it consciously. And of course, planning the environment conscientiously as well - not constantly asking questions and directing things. I'm all about the free play. But I can lesson plan it and facilitate it through an intentional environment.

At the same time, I don't have 5 children M-F, 6 AM to 6 PM. I don't know how someone could fit their planning in when they have a 12 hour work day and no breaks and no help :/ It's easy to say what we would do if we were in a position, quite another to actually do it, when in that position! I just agree with the idea of thinking ahead and planning. It keeps me focused and gets me to do things that wouldn't otherwise get done. Now should that method be mandatory - and therefore we then call child care providers "teachers" because they write down lesson plans? Idk. I feel like I was exposed to the best of both worlds because as I was taking my ECE classes I had my first son, we went to a co-op like Bev Bos'. One director was a by the book, curriculum developer (she was formerly the director of the college ECE program) and the other "assistant" director was completely free, emergent curriculum, daily to the point she could hardly stand to have the season written down in the planner because that was too much teacher directing lessons! After three years there as the chair of the children's curriculum committee, in the end, I guess, I became some of each style. So, I like the idea of having a plan, but making it completely child centered/initiated. And, I feel like if I am doing all this, and I have years of experience and education in this, then yes, I am a "teacher".
In general, I like the idea of high quality standards and some curriculum in child care. I don't mind the planning and I love teaching.

But . . . I have a few concerns with QRIS and requiring higher education for teachers. The first is that requiring child care providers to have degrees drives the price way up. We have QRIS here in Oregon and certified providers are required to be a step 8 on the Oregon registry. That means they need an Associate's. The average cost of care is $900 a month for a preschooler. (Family child care rate)

The other concern I have is that the government loves standardization. I attended the QRIS workshop here and there was an approved list of curriculum to choose from. I would hate for that to become a nationwide norm for child care.

I think that one of the great things about preschool and child care is the number of choices that parents have. They can pick a play based, RIE, Reggio, or Montessori child care. Standardization in child care takes those choices away from parents. I certainly hope child care doesn't become "school" for kids birth-5.
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Old 09-18-2016, 07:59 AM
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I love planning!
I love teaching!
Without it I'd be bored to death!

I have a very play-based program with a very interactive 5-10 minute circle time each day.

I offer a free choice creative area each day ( very Simple with play doh, oil pastel chalk & dark paper, markers, etc.) and also a creative art choice 2-3 times each week.

I'm transitioning to a Montessori & Waldorf inspired play space with basically wooden, felt, cloth, natural toys along with the self-help, activities on trays etc. of Montessori ( I worked in a Montessori preschool for awile)..

I obtained my BA in early childhood/el. Ed, got out of child care for quite some time.

Even before I had the BA (I had an associate in early childhood ) I channeled my inner teacher!

Yes, I am a teacher at heart! But my program is nurturing, dev. appropriate, cozy & homelike!
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Old 09-18-2016, 11:26 AM
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Hey, unregistered user, which books/resources do you find most helpful for classroom management/discipline/scheduling in a Montessori early care environment?
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Old 09-18-2016, 12:49 PM
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I love planning!
I love teaching!
Without it I'd be bored to death!

I have a very play-based program with a very interactive 5-10 minute circle time each day.

I offer a free choice creative area each day ( very Simple with play doh, oil pastel chalk & dark paper, markers, etc.) and also a creative art choice 2-3 times each week.

I'm transitioning to a Montessori & Waldorf inspired play space with basically wooden, felt, cloth, natural toys along with the self-help, activities on trays etc. of Montessori ( I worked in a Montessori preschool for awile)..

I obtained my BA in early childhood/el. Ed, got out of child care for quite some time.

Even before I had the BA (I had an associate in early childhood ) I channeled my inner teacher!

Yes, I am a teacher at heart! But my program is nurturing, dev. appropriate, cozy & homelike!
It sounds wonderful! I've always been a visual learner, cannot learn anything by someone telling me how to do it or reading about it. I swear I need someone to show me the way. If I could take a walk through of different programs and see how they're managed and offered, I could run with it.
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Old 09-18-2016, 03:12 PM
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Does this mean they will stop calling us babysitters?
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Old 09-19-2016, 06:56 AM
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I think that one of the great things about preschool and child care is the number of choices that parents have. They can pick a play based, RIE, Reggio, or Montessori child care. Standardization in child care takes those choices away from parents. I certainly hope child care doesn't become "school" for kids birth-5.
I am a play based program and am influenced by many of the Montessori and Reggio approaches, philosophies and beliefs.

BOTH are acceptable curriculums for QRIS in my state.
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Old 09-19-2016, 07:11 AM
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I am a play based program and am influenced by many of the Montessori and Reggio approaches, philosophies and beliefs.

BOTH are acceptable curriculums for QRIS in my state.
The woman at the training I just attended here was listing off standard prepackaged curriculum when I asked about our approved list. I am waiting for the full list. I am hoping I can write my own.
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Old 09-19-2016, 07:18 AM
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The woman at the training I just attended here was listing off standard prepackaged curriculum when I asked about our approved list. I am waiting for the full list. I am hoping I can write my own.
Here is the list for my state.
It's lengthy and offers options.

If all QRIS has to meet the same early learning standards, it sure would be helpful and nice if all states approved and accepted the same curricula.
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Old 09-19-2016, 09:27 AM
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I haven't read this whole post or arguments but I am a fully licensed teacher of Early Childhood Education for birth to 3rd grade. I am paying for student loans off and will be for years to come. I do not charge more then others in my area yet, but I do believe I could I am more educated for early childhood. I spent 5 years in school it was a ton of work and I do 'teach' the kids through play and developmentally appropriate methods.
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Old 09-19-2016, 11:14 AM
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On the other side of things, it bugs the heck out of me that 20 yr olds with 2 year degrees are called Teachers just like my husband and me, who have 4 year degrees. Other professions have titles that indicate degree of education (CNA vs RN for nursing, RDA vs DDS for dentistry, etc) I think the field of education should have similar designations. JMO...
I completely agree.
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Old 09-19-2016, 11:31 AM
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I haven't read this whole post or arguments but I am a fully licensed teacher of Early Childhood Education for birth to 3rd grade. I am paying for student loans off and will be for years to come. I do not charge more then others in my area yet, but I do believe I could I am more educated for early childhood. I spent 5 years in school it was a ton of work and I do 'teach' the kids through play and developmentally appropriate methods.
Why don't you charge more? I do it from the opening (yes, I'm a teacher and my kids are students.) I do more than others providers around me and I charge more.
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Old 09-20-2016, 07:35 AM
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Why don't you charge more? I do it from the opening (yes, I'm a teacher and my kids are students.) I do more than others providers around me and I charge more.
Mostly because im in a very rural area, newly started (in july) and still working towards my license (planning Jan 1st) at that time I will start using my handbook, curriculum more daily, and change my rates. I felt like I needed to build a good client base and go off refurals. I have made price changes over the past few months (18 mth and under hurler fees, on half dsy rates, ect) but my weekly rates are still comparable to home based LLEP (I am the only one in my area attempting to be licensed)
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