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  #1  
Old 06-20-2011, 01:17 PM
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Question Babysitter Or Childcare Provider

I have been thinking on this for a long time when one of my dcm's introduced me to her mother as their son's 'babysitter'. I don't know how i feel about this. I prepare 3 meals a day, do circle time, art projects and many other things. For all that i don't want to be just a 'babysitter'. If that's the case then what am doing all that for?
What are your feelings on this?
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Old 06-20-2011, 01:41 PM
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Nothing frustrates me more than being called a "Babysitter". All my clients call me that and have for the 15 years I have been doing this! No matter how often I correct them, put it in newsletter, etc. I'm still the babysitter! One I don't even take babies and two this is my career chose, not something I do in the evenings to make a few bucks. This actually is a job that pays my bills. Last week I had it done to me twice and I was so frustrated by it. I don't think we will be looked at anything more than that though and I have never in my life heard of a parent refer to us as a childcare provider.
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Old 06-20-2011, 02:04 PM
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Parents usually only make that mistake once with me.

I (lovingly) say these words:

A babysitter, comes to your home, eats your food, watches your tv, and talks on the phone to her boyfriend, while your child runs amuck, leaving a mess for you to clean up when you get home.

I have a degree in early education, provide a preschool environment, healthy snacks, and claim my income to the IRS.

If you would like me to be your babysitter, I charge $20 an hour. What night would you like me to start.
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Old 06-20-2011, 02:42 PM
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lol Nothing me bothers me more than being called a babysitter either . This never comes up unless I'm being introduced to someone by a DC parent. Last year at DCB's birthday party DCM introduced me to her sister and said "this is ____, DCB's babysitter" and I offered her sister a handshake and eye contact and just said "Child care provider. Pleased to meet you". DCM didn't catch on but sister did. Next I was introduced to a friend of DCM the same. Again I shook her hand and replied with a smile "Child care provider. Pleased to meet you". That time the DCM took notice but still introduced me to another friend of hers as the babysitter and again I replied the same. After the third time she caught on.
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Old 06-20-2011, 02:47 PM
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I don't sit on babies.
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Old 06-20-2011, 02:56 PM
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I could care less either way. Babysitter or Childcare Provider; Secretary or Administrative Assistant; Garbage man or Sanitation worker...it is all the same to me.

I, however, am not a Teacher. I have not earned that...my sisters have.
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Old 06-20-2011, 03:00 PM
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it's likely that the only way you'll hear it is if you hear a parent talking to someone about you, or if they're relaying a story to you: "i told her i have a babysitter."

you can fight it all you want, but unfortunately, that's how most parents and society in general sees child care providers. i have a bachelor's degree in early childhood, taught school, and still as a provider was referred to as "the babysitter."
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Old 06-20-2011, 03:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Catherder View Post
I could care less either way. Babysitter or Childcare Provider; Secretary or Administrative Assistant; Garbage man or Sanitation worker...it is all the same to me.

I, however, am not a Teacher. I have not earned that...my sisters have.
yeah, and the pay is the same too - which is all that matters really.

i guarantee if your sisters did daycare, the parents would say, "my son's babysitter is a teacher." it makes no difference.
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Old 06-20-2011, 03:07 PM
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yeah, and the pay is the same too - which is all that matters really.

i guarantee if your sisters did daycare, the parents would say, "my son's babysitter is a teacher." it makes no difference.
I know they would. I just gave up the semantics battle long ago.

Now, it is not WHAT they say it is HOW they say it.

When it is said with adoration I don't care what they call me....

The word MOTHER stings when spoken in just the right tone from a 13 year old girl with her eyes rolling, too....
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Old 06-20-2011, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by QualiTcare View Post
yeah, and the pay is the same too - which is all that matters really.

i guarantee if your sisters did daycare, the parents would say, "my son's babysitter is a teacher." it makes no difference.
I've had pretty much that exact thing said about me! "We are really lucky to have a babysitter who used to be a teacher!"

I don't mind not being called a teacher now that I work out of my home rather than in a classroom. I HATE being called a babysitter though. I was a babysitter when I was a teenager...BEFORE I went to school for 7 years to care for your lil darlings
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Old 06-20-2011, 03:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sharlan View Post
I don't sit on babies.
youre funny
the english language is funny

where I come from it translates to child minder, not baby sitter....lol
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Old 06-20-2011, 04:01 PM
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I agree with the I don't care what you call me group, just pay me on time and do what ever we agreed on that's in our contract.
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Old 06-20-2011, 06:46 PM
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I still get this sometimes, but I always correct them!

Over the years I have tried to guide their thinking too. I word my contract and handbook to say things like "the day care" instead of "my house" for example. I refer to "the business" as much as possible too instead of "me". I want them to think of me as a professional and not just the gal who watches the kids. But it's a tough one! I don't think we'll ever really get out from under the "babysitter" label.....
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Old 06-20-2011, 07:10 PM
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It irritates me to be called a babysitter and I have made the correction with the differences pointed out, (BTW good job Grandmom) then I get an "ohhhh yeah that's right sorry" Then a few months from then they mention they are at the babysitter's when arriving on the cell phone. Ya can't win and it's not a battle worth fighting so I make the correction once and if it sticks great but usually, not so much.
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Old 06-20-2011, 08:05 PM
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I found these poems that I think fit the situation. I might use some of them for future new clients!

CHILDCARE PROVIDER, BABYSITTER & NANNY

Childcare provider:
A professional childcare server who contracts with a client
to hold one slot out of a limited number of available slots exclusively for your child,
with a pre- determined set of hours, for a pre-determined fee per year.
Installments of this fee are usually paid on a weekly/bi-weekly/or on a monthly basis.
This usually includes a provider who is certified in first aid and CPR.
Takes classes, workshop, and attends seminars and conference to stay current on the latest techniques in dealing with age appropriate development of the children in their care.
In most states these Providers have usually undergone criminal back ground checks of themselves and all members over 18 residing in their home.
They are required to have regular medical check ups for all personel in the daycare home.
The providers home undergoes inspections by their licensing agency and regular inspections from the state fire marshall.

Baby-sitter:
A person who usually watches a child in the parents home on an irregular basis,
is not guaranteed to be there for the parent on a regular basis,
is rarely trained in basic life support or first aid, and usually does not provide age appropriate activities for the children in their care,
and is not limited in the amount of children they may have in their care at any one time.

Nanny:
A person hired by one family to provide care for their children on a regular basis in the child's home.
As this person is an employee of the parents, it is usually up to the parents to require and pay for a criminal back ground check if they so desire.
They do not have any kind of inspections by state agencies as they are the employee of the parents working in a private home.

~~~Author Unknown~~~


ODE TO DAYCARE

Little children come to me
For hugs and books and such,
I care for all their simple needs
And also fix them lunch

I pick up toys, mop up spills,
And dry their little tears,
I change diapers,settle fights,
And kiss away their fears.

I tie shoes, button coats,
And push them on the swing,
I really love these kids you see,
But there is one thing.

Call me Mom, or Aunt, or Teacher,
But please don't call me sitter,
Cause I never get to sit!.

~~Author Unknown~~

TOUCHING THE FUTURE

I don't wear power suits,
make speeches,
or drive a fancy sports car.
I've never talked on a car phone,
made a big sale,
or been elected to the Senate.
I don't "do lunch",
have a big imppressive office or carry a beeper.
I spend my days wiping away tears,
giving hugs,
and serving chicken nuggets.
A good day is when I go through a whole day
without a temper tantrum,
bite mark,
or a toilet training accident.
My "office" is a room full of brightly colored toys
and laughing children.
You may not think that what I do is very important
and you may even whisper behind my back
"what a waste of a good mind."
But I know better.
I make a difference
because I'm changing the world
one child at a time.
Everyday I'm getting the once in a lifetime chance
to touch the future.
I'm proud to say "I'm a child care provider"

~~By Marti Doyle~~

I AM A PROFESSIONAL

I am a professional. I may have chosen this line of work because I love children and I enjoy my job, but this is still my job/business. I have received specialized education and/or training to be a caregiver and educator for young children.
I AM NOT A BABYSITTER; I AM A PROFESSIONAL. I AM NOT GETTING RICH.
In many places childcare workers make less then public sanitation workers, secretaries and other jobs that require a lot less education and experience.

I do get paid in smiles, hugs and recognition of appreciation from families. I need you to read all material and notices. I am counting on you to know the information I send to you in writing. This includes newsletters, notes and contract material. It is important that you communicate with me. Let me know in advance if there will be a change in your child’s schedule, or the services you will need. If I ask you to bring in supplies for your child, please do. And make sure supplies are replenished as needed. This may include extra clothes, occasional art supplies, diapers etc.

Remember your child is not the only child in my care. Although I do my best to provide individualized attention at times, I am often unable to change polices or disrupt plans to accommodate the needs of one family. Please do not send your child if they are ill. If they are too ill to participate in the day’s activities they are too ill to be in care. I need to protect the health of other children as well. If your child is or WAS ill, please notify me.

I recognize that you are the most important person in your child’s life. I hope that we can work as a partnership for what is best for your child. Please share with me any concerns or questions about your child’s care and development. Work with me in helping your child learn, grow and develop.

~~Author Unknown~~

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Old 06-20-2011, 08:29 PM
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Here's the one I was originally looking for, and I finally found it:

Definition of a Child Care Provider (NOT "Babysitter"!)

Child Care Pro-vi-der (child'kâr prő vid'er)n. chef, baker, janitor, sock and shoe finder, coat buttoner, boot fitter, bottle washer, grocery shopper, diaper changer, protector, dish washer, nose wiper, vegetable pusher, floor sweeper, waiter, story teller, playground attendant, PE teacher, activity director, driver, zoo keeper, inspector, aerobics instructor, tutor, entertainer, therapist, manager, derby instructor, performer, bookkeeper, self-esteem builder, teacher, helper, well wisher, nurse, traffic controller, noise controller, life saver, thinker, problem solver, engineer, designer, counselor, safety instructor, arbitrator, creator, inventor, companion, musician, historian, technician, dietitian, athlete, beautician, fire marshall, analyst, artist, dentist, scientist, biologist, technologist, accountant, manicurist, receptionist, environmentalist, pharmacist, hygienist, speech therapist, reader, builder, informer, composer, supervisor, author, navigator, peacemaker, friend. . . . . . .

~author unknown
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Old 06-21-2011, 04:11 AM
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I like to choose my battles, and being called a "babysitter" vs "daycare provider" is not one I choose to fight. Yes, it used to really bother me, and I would correct each and every dcp that used the babysitter word within my earshot. But now, I choose not to fight a battle I can't win - as long as they treat me with respect and pay/pickup on time, they can call me "babysitter", "nanny", "teacher", "childcare giver", whatever they choose

But it's just not our profession that battles this I know.

I'm sure that the trash collectors would prefer to be referred to as "sanitation engineers" but every Tuesday when we hear that big truck in the neighborhood, I'm the first one to tell the children, "Here comes the garbage man!" And the kids all run and wave like crazy to the guys.
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Old 06-21-2011, 04:17 AM
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I like to choose my battles, and being called a "babysitter" vs "daycare provider" is not one I choose to fight. Yes, it used to really bother me, and I would correct each and every dcp that used the babysitter word within my earshot. But now, I choose not to fight a battle I can't win - as long as they treat me with respect and pay/pickup on time, they can call me "babysitter", "nanny", "teacher", "childcare giver", whatever they choose

But it's just not our profession that battles this I know.

I'm sure that the trash collectors would prefer to be referred to as "sanitation engineers" but every Tuesday when we hear that big truck in the neighborhood, I'm the first one to tell the children, "Here comes the garbage man!" And the kids all run and wave like crazy to the guys.

So true as long as they pay me on time and respect me they can call me what they want
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Old 06-21-2011, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by sharlan View Post
I don't sit on babies.
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Old 06-21-2011, 07:32 AM
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I provide childcare/daycare so I'm ok with either one. I also consider myself a teacher. I'm not a grade school teacher but we all know that the most learning occurs before age 5 so don't sell yourself short. When I worked in a daycare centre my title was "teacher" and I was addressed that way by the parents.
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Old 06-21-2011, 07:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariana View Post
I provide childcare/daycare so I'm ok with either one. I also consider myself a teacher. I'm not a grade school teacher but we all know that the most learning occurs before age 5 so don't sell yourself short. When I worked in a daycare center my title was "teacher" and I was addressed that way by the parents.
I don't see it as selling myself short...

I see it as inconsiderate and disrespectful to actual Teachers.

Please Don't take this as an attack on you, it is not, since many childcare providers have started believing this in recent years.

I am not directing that at Childcare Providers who went through all the years of school, student teaching, paying student loans and hours of hard paperwork to achieve their teaching credentials. You have my utmost respect.

I promise most Teachers feel the same as I do.
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Old 06-21-2011, 08:11 AM
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I don't see it as selling myself short...

I see it as inconsiderate and disrespectful to actual Teachers.

Please Don't take this as an attack on you, it is not, since many childcare providers have started believing this in recent years.

I am not directing that at Childcare Providers who went through all the years of school, student teaching, paying student loans and hours of hard paperwork to achieve their teaching credentials. You have my utmost respect.

I promise most Teachers feel the same as I do.
I guess it would be a case by case situation. In my years of this profession I have had many teachers/people that work with children in the schools and they all started calling me Teacher ****. Nothing I personally started but they did. It was something they felt was appropriate since I spent most of their days interacting with their child and teaching them different things. Yes, I am a childcare provider by profession but when the children address me it is as Teacher *****.
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Old 06-21-2011, 08:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catherder View Post
I don't see it as selling myself short...

I see it as inconsiderate and disrespectful to actual Teachers.

Please Don't take this as an attack on you, it is not, since many childcare providers have started believing this in recent years.

I am not directing that at Childcare Providers who went through all the years of school, student teaching, paying student loans and hours of hard paperwork to achieve their teaching credentials. You have my utmost respect.

I promise most Teachers feel the same as I do.
I agree! I am one of those child care providers/babysitters/daycare ladies who have gone through the years of schooling, devoted hours to class time, inter hours and homework as well as added heavily to my debt load to achieve my teaching credentials. However, I am currently working in the child care field as a home based child care provider.

I know my child care children learn things from me as they learn from their parents, but I do not consider myself a "teacher" that deserves the title no more than I deserve to be called a nurse because I am fairly experienced in figuring out when someone has a cold, cough, ear infection, rash, chicken pox, head lice, hives, eczema or the other myriad of childhood illnesses we deal with every day, as well as giving nebulizers, checking DH's blood pressure and dispensing insulin shots to a 6 year old diabetic...kwim?

If I choose to earn the degree and work in the field of nursing then I could be called a nurse. I earned the teaching degree BUT do not choose at this time to work in the field. That is my personal opinion on how I differentiate the two very different but somewhat similar roles of childcare provider/teacher.

I know this thread shows "symptoms" of being one of those hot button topics so I am out, but just wanted to state how I felt about it. However, everyone is entitled to their own opinion and no one's carries more weight than anothers.
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Old 06-21-2011, 10:52 AM
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I used to get really, really mad at being referred to as "the sitter" and I would rant and rave to my husband about really hating being called that. I know that there was no offense meant by it from the daycare parents but it still hurt my feelings. I felt very disrespected because it seemed like the title of "the sitter" diminished how much time, money and effort into providing top quality care.

Now if I ever find myself getting worked up over being referred to as the sitter or the babysitter, etc. I just remind myself that this is my chosen career and that I make a pretty decent amount of money at it. That takes the edge off
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Old 06-21-2011, 12:58 PM
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I'm the group that doesn't really care if they call me a babysitter, or a child care provider, Nanny, or that girl I drop the kids off with. haha. As long as we have a good business relationship, and the kids are happy, healthy, and safe, I am good to go.
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Old 06-21-2011, 01:20 PM
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I think I was a little upset when one of my dcd's picked up the phone and said ohhh...it's my work can you watch little guy and then as he was walking down the stairs said.."Oh, yea...I am at the babysitters right now picking up my son." I wanted to correct him but i let it go bc his wife knows I am not a babysitter. lol!! Not to mention hard to correct someone when there on the phone..lol. I don't really get that from any of my parents though...I am really lucky that my families I think like the sound of daycare provider bc it sounds more professional. But some slip up and say babysitter. I think it is just easier to say that then daycare provider....who knows...maybe we should ask them sometime why they keep calling us babysitters. Dare some one to ask!!!lol!!
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Old 06-21-2011, 02:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by QualiTcare View Post
yeah, and the pay is the same too - which is all that matters really.

i guarantee if your sisters did daycare, the parents would say, "my son's babysitter is a teacher." it makes no difference.
LOL! That is funny...because it is SO true!
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Old 06-21-2011, 02:56 PM
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I've found that I actually PREFER to be "the babysitter". Less pressure for me!
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Old 06-21-2011, 04:26 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Catherder View Post
I don't see it as selling myself short...

I see it as inconsiderate and disrespectful to actual Teachers.

Please Don't take this as an attack on you, it is not, since many childcare providers have started believing this in recent years.

I am not directing that at Childcare Providers who went through all the years of school, student teaching, paying student loans and hours of hard paperwork to achieve their teaching credentials. You have my utmost respect.

I promise most Teachers feel the same as I do.
No offense taken

I don't see it as a disrespect to teachers. I'm actually quite shocked that any teacher would take offense to this. I'm an educated teacher of young children. Each and every day I teach. Just because I teach outside of the school system doesn't mean I'm any less of a teacher....just my opinion I also know many teachers who feel the same as I do!
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Old 06-21-2011, 05:18 PM
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As long as they pay ontime and follow the rules they can call me whatever. It does bother me a little though, so when given the opportunity I correct it politely.
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Old 06-21-2011, 10:37 PM
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we already went through this whole debate before, but every time i see someone say "just bc i didn't go to school doesn't mean i'm not a teacher" i can't help but picture a pill pusher saying (while being arrested), "just bc i didn't go to school doesn't mean i'm not a pharmacist." it's a funny picture anyway. insert lawyer, nurse, vet, etc.
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Old 06-21-2011, 10:40 PM
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[quote=Joyce;121412]I found these poems that I think fit the situation. I might use some of them for future new clients!

ODE TO DAYCARE

Little children come to me
For hugs and books and such,
I care for all their simple needs
And also fix them lunch

I pick up toys, mop up spills,
And dry their little tears,
I change diapers,settle fights,
And kiss away their fears.

I tie shoes, button coats,
And push them on the swing,
I really love these kids you see,
But there is one thing.

Call me Mom, or Aunt, or Teacher,
But please don't call me sitter,
Cause I never get to sit!.

~~Author Unknown~~

[color="Red"]TOUCHING THE FUTURE

i printed out copies of a poem just like this (it was a bit different, but the last line was exact) and put them in frames from the dollar tree as part of the gifts for my kid's childcare providers when they were younger. they hung them in their rooms and it was so easy/cheap to do.
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Old 06-23-2011, 08:10 AM
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I had to bring this post back up because I'm pretty bummed. Just found out that a friend of mine's daughter (teenager) is babysitting and making more an hour/week than I am. She is making about .75 cents more an hour than I am but thats quite a bit. Maybe I will go into jus babysitting! She also is just taking care of one child who is an older SA. No diaper changing, no having to help feed, wash hands, help going to the bathroom-how nice.
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Old 06-23-2011, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Country Kids View Post
I had to bring this post back up because I'm pretty bummed. Just found out that a friend of mine's daughter (teenager) is babysitting and making more an hour/week than I am. She is making about .75 cents more an hour than I am but thats quite a bit. Maybe I will go into jus babysitting! She also is just taking care of one child who is an older SA. No diaper changing, no having to help feed, wash hands, help going to the bathroom-how nice.
yep, my DD babysat for every one of my daycare families when in her teens as well as some of our neighbors and her going rate was $10 per hour and $2 for each additional kid. I always joked I was going to start babysitting instead of childcare, the benefits are clearly better since all supplies are provided by parent, any wear and tear is at the parents home and if I didn't really like the kid, I could simply say no the next time they called without having to give notice.
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Old 06-23-2011, 08:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Country Kids View Post
I had to bring this post back up because I'm pretty bummed. Just found out that a friend of mine's daughter (teenager) is babysitting and making more an hour/week than I am. She is making about .75 cents more an hour than I am but thats quite a bit. Maybe I will go into jus babysitting! She also is just taking care of one child who is an older SA. No diaper changing, no having to help feed, wash hands, help going to the bathroom-how nice.
I hear you...my Daughter is 14 and makes more than I do for one child for the same hours (and they provide all food/supplies even her own breakfast/lunch).

Granted I take 6 kids to her one....it is just reality.

I do like that she can buy her own school clothes, now.
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Old 11-19-2012, 11:57 AM
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Default babysitting vs child care

Is It Babysitting or Child Care?

Who does it? Babysitting: Usually teenagers Child Care: Usually adult females

What is it? Babysitting: Temporary care of children. Usually part-time. Child Care: Permanent care of children. Can be part- or full-time.

When is it done? Babysitting: Nights, weekends Child Care: Daily during typical working hours

How often is it done? Babysitting: Once or twice a week, or less. Child Care: Every working day of the year

Why is it done? Babysitting: For the sitter - to earn spending money. For the parent - to get a break from the kids. Child Care: For the provider - to self-support. For the parent - to provide care, guidance, and educational opportunities for children while parents work.

How is it done? Babysitting: Babysitter usually cares for one family's children at a time. Can be actively engaged with the children in play or be passively involved (supervising children while they are playing or asleep while babysitter engages in other activities like studying, watching TV, talking on the phone). Meets the custodial need for the children: feeds, changes diapers, bathes, beds.
Child Care: Child care provider meets the developmental and educational needs of young children. S/he stimulates language, intellectual, self-help, social/emotional, fine motor, and gross motor development by providing developmentally appropriate activities. Is actively engaged with groups of young children from several families simultaneously. Guides children toward positive behavior.

Where is it done? Babysitting: Typically the babysitter comes to the home of the family where services are required. Child Care: In child care facilities that are environments specifically designed for children.

How much does it cost? Babysitting: Usually a nominal per hour rate is charged based on the number of children. Often left up to the discretion of the parent. Child Care: Child care is a business. Parents may be billed an hourly rate per child, or billed weekly at a predetermined rate per child. Some centers offer sliding fee scales for more than one child in a family or for low-income families.

What kind of training is required? Babysitting: No training is required. Most babysitters have no training. Some may attend a brief 1-2 hour workshop on "how to baby-sit". Child Care: Annual training is required by the state for all registered or licensed child care facilities. Training varies from those who hold a baccalaureate degree, associates degree, or just the minimum required training.
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Old 11-19-2012, 02:59 PM
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When she introduced you as her babysitter you could have said, "I assure you, I do not sit on her baby."
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Old 11-19-2012, 03:18 PM
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Originally Posted by blueclouds29 View Post
I have been thinking on this for a long time when one of my dcm's introduced me to her mother as their son's 'babysitter'. I don't know how i feel about this. I prepare 3 meals a day, do circle time, art projects and many other things. For all that i don't want to be just a 'babysitter'. If that's the case then what am doing all that for?
What are your feelings on this?
I'm not going to lie. I had someone call today and inquire about "a babysitter" - I told her I was full (true) and didn't offer to put on my waiting list... which I would normally do - but being called a "babysitter" seriously turned me off.

When cirrent clients refer to me as "the babysitter", I quickly correct them and say "you mean childcare provider" and smile big This usually ends me hearing that word form that particular mouth ever again!
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Old 11-19-2012, 03:28 PM
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Not that this topic is not still relevant - it is - but the original posts are from 2011.
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  #40  
Old 11-19-2012, 03:57 PM
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No offense taken

I don't see it as a disrespect to teachers. I'm actually quite shocked that any teacher would take offense to this. I'm an educated teacher of young children. Each and every day I teach. Just because I teach outside of the school system doesn't mean I'm any less of a teacher....just my opinion I also know many teachers who feel the same as I do!
I agree.

(I went to University, went through student teaching, got my ESL Early Childhood-6th Grade degree, saw the hiring freeze here and opened up my own business.)

Babysitter does bother me. I have a teaching degree that I use in my Preschool. When I was a babysitter I didn't even need to be a high school graduate and each family paid me $10 an hour. But, to be fair the last parent that called me a babysitter asked if I have children bussed back and forth to Preschool. I looked at her very oddly and said, "No. I AM a Preschool, that would be quite strange."
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Old 01-03-2013, 01:53 PM
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Exclamation There is a big differnce between a babysitter and a child care provider:

I know this post is a little old but this subject really puses my buttons.

Babysitters for the most part go to the person's hours they don't need a liscense or any training/schooling and get paid more an hour than professional providers (usually about $10-$15/hr) they also only watch for one family which the average family has 1-3 children. Plus most get to eat food from the families fridge and watch their TV and many do not provide (let alone pay for) activities/curriculum. Some babysitters are just teenagers who need to make a little bit of cash to go shopping and most babysitters don't pay taxes. they also only work maybe 1x or 2x a week on average

Depending on your state/county most providers need a liscence, 15 hours of health/safety training, attend an orientation, and pay for liscense registration/training fees get paid maybe an average of $1-3/hour per child. And some go to school to learn about child development/ECE so they can get a certificate/AA/CDA/ or teaching permit so they can teach preschool or learn how to build a curriculum (espesually those who teach preschool). One of my CD/ECE professors said when she was a director of a center/preschool and was still called a babysitter. She said that it's not just family child care but all professionals that work with young children tend to be thought of as "Glorified babysitters" in society. She said that the only way we will get the respect we deserve is to project a professional image by staying educated and using as much correct/scientific terms to discribe development as well as have clear contracts/policies and sticking to them
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  #42  
Old 05-18-2015, 07:11 AM
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Default Not Polically Correct

I don't really like being called a babysitter but it the grand scheme of things it isn't that big of a deal. I think of it in the same way as an administrative assistant being called a secretary. Times have changed but terminology hasn't in many areas so especially for those who aren't "politically correct".
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  #43  
Old 05-18-2015, 01:32 PM
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Originally Posted by Lucy View Post
I found these poems that I think fit the situation. I might use some of them for future new clients!

CHILDCARE PROVIDER, BABYSITTER & NANNY

Childcare provider:
A professional childcare server who contracts with a client
to hold one slot out of a limited number of available slots exclusively for your child,
with a pre- determined set of hours, for a pre-determined fee per year.
Installments of this fee are usually paid on a weekly/bi-weekly/or on a monthly basis.
This usually includes a provider who is certified in first aid and CPR.
Takes classes, workshop, and attends seminars and conference to stay current on the latest techniques in dealing with age appropriate development of the children in their care.
In most states these Providers have usually undergone criminal back ground checks of themselves and all members over 18 residing in their home.
They are required to have regular medical check ups for all personel in the daycare home.
The providers home undergoes inspections by their licensing agency and regular inspections from the state fire marshall.

Baby-sitter:
A person who usually watches a child in the parents home on an irregular basis,
is not guaranteed to be there for the parent on a regular basis,
is rarely trained in basic life support or first aid, and usually does not provide age appropriate activities for the children in their care,
and is not limited in the amount of children they may have in their care at any one time.

Nanny:
A person hired by one family to provide care for their children on a regular basis in the child's home.
As this person is an employee of the parents, it is usually up to the parents to require and pay for a criminal back ground check if they so desire.
They do not have any kind of inspections by state agencies as they are the employee of the parents working in a private home.

~~~Author Unknown~~~


ODE TO DAYCARE

Little children come to me
For hugs and books and such,
I care for all their simple needs
And also fix them lunch

I pick up toys, mop up spills,
And dry their little tears,
I change diapers,settle fights,
And kiss away their fears.

I tie shoes, button coats,
And push them on the swing,
I really love these kids you see,
But there is one thing.

Call me Mom, or Aunt, or Teacher,
But please don't call me sitter,
Cause I never get to sit!.

~~Author Unknown~~

TOUCHING THE FUTURE

I don't wear power suits,
make speeches,
or drive a fancy sports car.
I've never talked on a car phone,
made a big sale,
or been elected to the Senate.
I don't "do lunch",
have a big imppressive office or carry a beeper.
I spend my days wiping away tears,
giving hugs,
and serving chicken nuggets.
A good day is when I go through a whole day
without a temper tantrum,
bite mark,
or a toilet training accident.
My "office" is a room full of brightly colored toys
and laughing children.
You may not think that what I do is very important
and you may even whisper behind my back
"what a waste of a good mind."
But I know better.
I make a difference
because I'm changing the world
one child at a time.
Everyday I'm getting the once in a lifetime chance
to touch the future.
I'm proud to say "I'm a child care provider"

~~By Marti Doyle~~

I AM A PROFESSIONAL

I am a professional. I may have chosen this line of work because I love children and I enjoy my job, but this is still my job/business. I have received specialized education and/or training to be a caregiver and educator for young children.
I AM NOT A BABYSITTER; I AM A PROFESSIONAL. I AM NOT GETTING RICH.
In many places childcare workers make less then public sanitation workers, secretaries and other jobs that require a lot less education and experience.

I do get paid in smiles, hugs and recognition of appreciation from families. I need you to read all material and notices. I am counting on you to know the information I send to you in writing. This includes newsletters, notes and contract material. It is important that you communicate with me. Let me know in advance if there will be a change in your child’s schedule, or the services you will need. If I ask you to bring in supplies for your child, please do. And make sure supplies are replenished as needed. This may include extra clothes, occasional art supplies, diapers etc.

Remember your child is not the only child in my care. Although I do my best to provide individualized attention at times, I am often unable to change polices or disrupt plans to accommodate the needs of one family. Please do not send your child if they are ill. If they are too ill to participate in the day’s activities they are too ill to be in care. I need to protect the health of other children as well. If your child is or WAS ill, please notify me.

I recognize that you are the most important person in your child’s life. I hope that we can work as a partnership for what is best for your child. Please share with me any concerns or questions about your child’s care and development. Work with me in helping your child learn, grow and develop.

~~Author Unknown~~

I "knew" Marti Doyle when she was a provider (long time ago when I first started); I remember when Touching the Future was written & why she quit being a provider too. Originally the poem was listed on another Forum
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  #44  
Old 05-18-2015, 02:55 PM
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That is an awesome comeback!!!!!!






!
Quote:
Originally Posted by grandmom View Post
Parents usually only make that mistake once with me.

I (lovingly) say these words:

A babysitter, comes to your home, eats your food, watches your tv, and talks on the phone to her boyfriend, while your child runs amuck, leaving a mess for you to clean up when you get home.

I have a degree in early education, provide a preschool environment, healthy snacks, and claim my income to the IRS.

If you would like me to be your babysitter, I charge $20 an hour. What night would you like me to start.
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Old 05-18-2015, 03:59 PM
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This isn't a battle I'm willing to fight.
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