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Old 05-23-2012, 08:40 AM
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Default An Article On Angry Children...

http://www.empoweringparents.com/Ang...Gun-at-You.php

This is from the guy who wrote "the total transformation", which I have not read.

What do you think???
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Old 05-23-2012, 11:23 AM
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I would really liek to read this artical, but it askes me to send in my email to finish reading My daycare computer took nearly 7 minutes just to load that page so I can imagine it will take more time then I have to get to the artical. (my computer is a hugh pile)

I have two 5yr boys who have HUGE anger issues, and I hope thie artical will be helpful! I will try later tonight.
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Old 05-23-2012, 11:25 AM
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I would really liek to read this artical, but it askes me to send in my email to finish reading My daycare computer took nearly 7 minutes just to load that page so I can imagine it will take more time then I have to get to the artical. (my computer is a hugh pile)

I have two 5yr boys who have HUGE anger issues, and I hope thie artical will be helpful! I will try later tonight.
I did put my email addy in, and so far, anyway, my inbox is NOT flooded with crud!
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Old 05-23-2012, 11:36 AM
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Here is the article:

When children use anger to get what they want, it can feel for all the world like they’re pointing a loaded weapon at you. As a parent, you dread the ugly and sometimes violent emotional outbursts that come with this type of behavior. Before I discuss children who use anger as a weapon—or the way that I like to put it, as a problem solving technique—I want to caution people that once a child is using extreme anger, they’re in a lot of trouble. And by the way, I’m not talking about a two-year-old throwing a tantrum, I’m talking about a five-year-old throwing toys around the room or an eight-year-old hitting his sister or a twelve-year-old kicking holes in the wall. Once a child is at that level, there are some serious issues at stake, and you need to get them some help fast. There’s no way I can address every aspect of this problem in one article, but what I can do is explain a little bit more about what’s going through your child’s head, and the steps you need to take as a parent to change this pattern of behavior.


How Kids Use Anger to Control Their Environment
From the age of four, almost all of us learned how to solve our anger problems, and now we do it so easily and quickly that we don’t even realize that we’re solving them. We feel angry at our boss but we keep our mouth shut. Perhaps we jog after work, or we go to the gym. Or we watch a movie or read a book. We do things that enrich our lives to compensate for the stressors that we feel: We find a way to solve those problems.


But with kids who use anger to manipulate a situation, it’s a whole different story. They’ve learned to solve the problem of feeling uncomfortable by striking out at others. When they have a hard time, instead of dealing with their emotions, they strike out. And in the short term, that solves their problem—usually people back off. If their parents or teachers or caregivers don’t back off the first time, they back off the second or third or fifth or tenth time. Even if they just kicked a hole in your wall, they don’t even see it as their wall, they don’t care. To put it plainly, the child or the teenager has nothing to lose.

Once children learn how to use acting out, aggression, destructive behavior and verbal abuse—that whole family of behaviors—as a coping mechanism, as a skill to solve life’s problems, they are treading on dangerous territory. Because when they find that it works, they keep doing it. And the older they get, the more that technique becomes ingrained in them. And so by the time they’re older children or entering early adolescence, this is their main way of coping with anything that frustrates or upsets them.

Are Your Younger Child’s Meltdowns Giving him Control?
It’s simple: the more your young child succeeds at using anger and destructive behavior as a way to solve his problems—and the more you let him get away with doing that—the more entrenched that behavior is going to become.

Here’s what happens: Your child is faced with a situation that’s frustrating. He responds by losing control. As a parent, you see your child melting down. But if you look at the bigger picture, is he really losing control? Because here’s the thing: the next time you tell him he has to go clean his room, you’re going to remember the last explosion and you’re going to ask in a different way, or soften the request. If he explodes again, eventually you’ll clean his room yourself. So even though it looks like he’s losing control by melting down, in reality he’s getting more and more control over everybody in the house.

The same thing happens at school. Even though these kids look like they’re losing control when they act out, in fact, they’re getting more control over the class because they wind up not having to do the work. Somewhere along the line the child learned that acting this way gave him an edge, and gave him some power—it gave him some control over the adults in his life. The expectations placed upon him were diminished, and the tolerance for inappropriate behavior was raised. In his very bright human mind, he realized that it worked. And so he tried it again, it worked again, and it worked again until it became a pattern.

When these kids lose control, in their mind, they’re in control. They’re getting back at you. They’re showing you that they’re not going to do what you ask of them. If not now, then maybe the next time you’re going to ignore their behavior and do it yourself. And that’s their goal. It’s a very difficult pattern to break as a parent and you may very well need guidance from a behavioral program or a behavioral specialist, even when your child is still young.

For Parents of Angry, Acting-out Teens
I think if teens are acting out and using anger to control you, they certainly have years of experience that says that this method works for them. They may behave themselves around their friends, or around the police. They have to behave themselves in public for the most part, and they tend to do so. But when they get home or are at school where this behavior works, they readily employ it.

So, what happens? You see these kids get moved through school. There are countless conferences with teachers and parents and school psychologists. But really, in the end, if the child is resolute, nothing changes. He goes to Special Ed classes where they tiptoe around him and he does easy work. They pat him on the head when he spells ten words right and tell him what a great guy he is. In short, they do everything they can to manage his behavior. And the school’s goal, by the way, is not to educate him at that point—it’s to manage his behavior. And that’s exactly what he wants. He wants to control the environment, control you through his behavior. He wants it to be your job to not upset him. The message to you is, “If you upset me, bad things are going to happen.”

Never lose sight of the fact that as a parent, your most important job is to teach your child how to learn to solve problems. Teens are miserable half the time because they’re dealing with some tremendous problems and at the same time, trying to learn how to manage life. They’re not children anymore and they’re not adults, but they are starting to have some adult expectations of responsibility—without the benefit of all the tools adults have. In fact, the only way they can get those tools is by learning how to manage situations. There’s a saying I like: “Action precedes understanding.” In other words, teenagers have to go through all of this stuff, and in the end, they’ll understand how it helped them.

But kids who avoid solving problems through intimidation, abuse, anger and acting out behavior don’t develop the skills to deal with life. Sadly, they wind up as young adults whose primary problem solving skill is to intimidate others and break things if they don’t get their way. The truth is, there’s no future in our world for adults like that. And they rarely grow up without encounters with the police, substance abuse, and criminal activity.


For kids who learn how to solve problems through defiance, all they do is defy. And if you ask them why they did it, they’ll tell you it was your fault or somebody else’s fault. “I was wrong but you made me. You wouldn’t let me have the money. You wouldn’t let me stay up and watch TV. You wanted me to clean my room and not let me finish my game.” You, you, you. And these kids wind up feeling like a victim all the time, and you know, if you feel like a victim then the rules don’t apply to you. And so they strike out defiantly, and that becomes their main technique to solving problems. Who are these kids I'm speaking about? They’re the brooding teenagers who are angry all the time at home. They become teens who get involved with drugs and alcohol. They become teens who get involved with petty crime and the police. And you know, you’ll see them do antisocial things in the community. They’ll be destructive, knock down people’s mailboxes, or break into cars. And they get involved with all that because they actually see themselves as victims and therefore, somehow it’s different for them. But as a parent, you’ve got to really rigorously and strongly challenge that feeling and that way of thinking. For people who aren’t able to give up that victim identity, it becomes very hard to change.

Getting Control Back
I think the way that you get control back is to grit your teeth and be ready for a big fight. Start saying no, and mean it. Be prepared to lock up the video game in the trunk of your car. Be prepared to let your child scream in the store for 15 minutes. Be prepared to call the police. Be prepared to go through these things and be ready to do what it takes for your child to understand that this strategy, this problem solving skill of acting out, doesn’t work anymore. If you aren’t able to deal with this problem, you’re endangering yourself and you’re endangering your child. The behavior is going to escalate. Parents need to understand that and seek outside resources, have a backup plan, and be prepared to stand your ground.

I suggest you read as much as you can on the subject of managing kids with behavior problems. Find a behavior-oriented therapist. Work with the school and do whatever you can. Also, there are books available at the book store and programs available online that can help you get the skills you need. I developed The Total Transformation Program to help parents in this exact situation by giving them a plan, a practical way to grit their teeth, say no, mean it, and know what to do next. Because, if this problem doesn’t change in your child, in adulthood it becomes really terrible and sad. The terrible part is, of course, adults can’t solve their problems by acting out and exploding. They wind up in jail, they wind up fired, they wind up hopeless. And it’s sad because when the child becomes an adult, he really feels cheated by life. He doesn’t understand why he hasn’t made it and other kids have. And he really feels like a loser—in fact, these kids feel like losers for a great amount of their lives, because they know right from wrong. Many times after they act inappropriately they feel sad and confused. Deep down, they know what good behavior is and bad behavior is—they just can’t operationalize it when they’re upset.

So if you’re in this position with your child, you need to learn new problem solving skills. In essence, you have to develop special parenting skills for kids who have special needs. And you know, you can tell if your parenting skills are working or not if your kid’s out of control. And if that's the case, that doesn’t mean you’re a bad parent—far from it. You’re tolerating your child, you’re doing the best you can. What it means is that your child also needs to develop a new set of skills, and your child needs a parent with a level of skills that you don’t have yet.

The good news is you can get those skills that you need to teach your child how to manage his behavior. You can go online to find support. You can see a therapist who deals with behavioral problems and who can teach you techniques to deal with your child. Yes, action precedes understanding. And you can start taking actions now. Don’t be so intimidated by your child’s anger that you are afraid to take action and get the help you and your child need.


Read more: http://www.empoweringparents.com/Ang...#ixzz1viPpgNlG
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Old 05-23-2012, 11:37 AM
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I posted this morning about my angry dck, so I really wanted to read this article. But my email is flooded with enough random crap, so ill have to pass. It seemed too dramatic for my taste anyway....if an 8 year old hits his sister, he's "extremely angry" and needs mental help? Nah.
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Old 05-23-2012, 12:10 PM
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Thanks for the article. Explains my DD7 to a tee. (Thankfully she's an angel at school). About 3 months ago we had her start seeing a therapist and that has really helped her.
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Old 05-23-2012, 12:21 PM
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I like how it points out that it isn't just a problem in the now, that the child will continue to have problems later on in life. The author is very direct and explanative. I would like to find a way to print this out and give it to the mother of one of my dcbs. He just turned 8 and has anger issues. He is on meds and they do make a difference, but she needs to understand that he is still controlling her, and she needs to learn to take control back. I just don't know how to approach this with her. She knows her kid is out of control with her - he's just fine without her around... Or maybe I should say her kid is in control.
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Old 05-23-2012, 01:05 PM
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I've talked here about one of my dcb's (5) who throws big ol' tantrums. It has always been clear to me that he is completely IN CONTROL of these episodes. I have witnessed him turn them off (hey...there's a squirrel...lol)

I like that this article doesn't sugar-coat, and gives the child credit for being capable...
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Old 05-23-2012, 01:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Hunni Bee View Post
I posted this morning about my angry dck, so I really wanted to read this article. But my email is flooded with enough random crap, so ill have to pass. It seemed too dramatic for my taste anyway....if an 8 year old hits his sister, he's "extremely angry" and needs mental help? Nah.
That is an interesting take on the article. I guess he does talk about help, but he also is talking about even teenagers. In fact, I don't think much of this can be diagnosed or figured out until they are older than most of our kids - which means they end up in the school system. The school system is neither the place nor has the time to deal with individuals who have not learned appropriate behavior skills.

I guess, overall, I mostly agree with the article. Having raised a child who has serious issues, I know now that I did things wrong when raising him. As the article said, I did the best I knew how and what I had been taught and what I had read at the time, but sometimes we just need to come back to the basics. Right and wrong. Acceptable and unacceptable. I use those words a lot now.

I don't think the lines are as black and white as the article would have us believe, and I don't think that it is always easy to distinguish the lines. But I HAVE seen kids like this, my son being one of them. He did not respond to my training like his sisters did. And I do feel that I should have done things differently with him.

That said, the article makes it look so easy when it's not. If a person is raising two or five or seven children at a time, sometimes it's hard to single out one child and deal with him in a whole different way than the rest of the children. Life doesn't really happen that way.

But I do agree that the main and key ingredient is to not allow inappropriate behavior. Period. Ever. And I agree that that element is missing in the way parents raise children these days.
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Old 05-23-2012, 02:33 PM
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It's written by someone with a Masters in Social Work. I hardly think this qualifies him to be an expert on anything child related! I'd read the article if he had a Masters in Child Development, or a PhD in Child Psychology. JMO
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Old 05-23-2012, 03:41 PM
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That is an interesting take on the article. I guess he does talk about help, but he also is talking about even teenagers. In fact, I don't think much of this can be diagnosed or figured out until they are older than most of our kids - which means they end up in the school system. The school system is neither the place nor has the time to deal with individuals who have not learned appropriate behavior skills.

I guess, overall, I mostly agree with the article. Having raised a child who has serious issues, I know now that I did things wrong when raising him. As the article said, I did the best I knew how and what I had been taught and what I had read at the time, but sometimes we just need to come back to the basics. Right and wrong. Acceptable and unacceptable. I use those words a lot now.

I don't think the lines are as black and white as the article would have us believe, and I don't think that it is always easy to distinguish the lines. But I HAVE seen kids like this, my son being one of them. He did not respond to my training like his sisters did. And I do feel that I should have done things differently with him.

That said, the article makes it look so easy when it's not. If a person is raising two or five or seven children at a time, sometimes it's hard to single out one child and deal with him in a whole different way than the rest of the children. Life doesn't really happen that way.

But I do agree that the main and key ingredient is to not allow inappropriate behavior. Period. Ever. And I agree that that element is missing in the way parents raise children these days.
I agree with some of his points. He is exactly right that kids are as "out of control" as some people would have you believe, but are just the opposite - in control of the situation. I thought that was right on the money.

But his overall tone of "if your kid throws toys or yells sometimes, they're in need mental help" and "get a backbone" was a little offputting. And I disagree that the answer to a screaming, red-faced episode is a "fight". I feel that with an angry child (not teenager) the first priority is to de-escalate the situation. Then deal with the cause and mete out the consequences. You don't investigate the fire while its still burning, you put it out first.

JMO.
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Old 05-23-2012, 06:50 PM
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I agree with some of his points. He is exactly right that kids are as "out of control" as some people would have you believe, but are just the opposite - in control of the situation. I thought that was right on the money.

But his overall tone of "if your kid throws toys or yells sometimes, they're in need mental help" and "get a backbone" was a little offputting. And I disagree that the answer to a screaming, red-faced episode is a "fight". I feel that with an angry child (not teenager) the first priority is to de-escalate the situation. Then deal with the cause and mete out the consequences. You don't investigate the fire while its still burning, you put it out first.

JMO.
I agree with you about the tone of the article, rather condescending. And I agree about the "fighting" the way you put it! I guess I took it differently, thinking he meant you have a "fight" ahead of you. To deal with an already angry teenager, you have to change the "rules" that they live by and take control. Things get worse at first. Even possibly physical. But it's the only way to do it. That's what I thought he meant. Just read it differently.
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Old 05-23-2012, 07:59 PM
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I agree with you about the tone of the article, rather condescending. And I agree about the "fighting" the way you put it! I guess I took it differently, thinking he meant you have a "fight" ahead of you. To deal with an already angry teenager, you have to change the "rules" that they live by and take control. Things get worse at first. Even possibly physical. But it's the only way to do it. That's what I thought he meant. Just read it differently.
I read it the same way you did...
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Old 05-24-2012, 06:19 AM
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I liked the article, and I think he made some very valid points.

I am struggling right now with my DS (age 4) who cannot control his anger, so I really wanted some good suggestions on how to deal with the situation when the anger gets out of control.

I didn't like how 2/3s of the article was explaining the behavior, how it starts, why it starts, how it's likely to end up in the future. Then there were some tiny little paragraphs at the end that talks about how to take control back. I really don't think he offered nearly enough tactics on how to curb the behavior at all. I was left feeling disappointed.

I also disliked how he seemed to assume that a 5 yr old throwing toys is going to end up as a teenager into drugs, alcohol, and eventually in the jail system. It's not always the case. He mentioned that it was very rare, for someone who uses anger to manipulate; to grow up as a useful member of society, but I don't think it is. My DH has a huge temper, this is where my 4 yr old gets it, and he still doesn't manage anger well. However, he has NEVER done drugs or had a problem with alcohol, and he has NEVER violently lashed out on those he cares about, and is an outstanding member of society. He likes to take his anger out on physical objects instead. People don't always fit into an exact mold, everyone is different.
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Old 05-24-2012, 06:55 AM
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I liked the article, and I think he made some very valid points.

I am struggling right now with my DS (age 4) who cannot control his anger, so I really wanted some good suggestions on how to deal with the situation when the anger gets out of control.

I didn't like how 2/3s of the article was explaining the behavior, how it starts, why it starts, how it's likely to end up in the future. Then there were some tiny little paragraphs at the end that talks about how to take control back. I really don't think he offered nearly enough tactics on how to curb the behavior at all. I was left feeling disappointed.

I also disliked how he seemed to assume that a 5 yr old throwing toys is going to end up as a teenager into drugs, alcohol, and eventually in the jail system. It's not always the case. He mentioned that it was very rare, for someone who uses anger to manipulate; to grow up as a useful member of society, but I don't think it is. My DH has a huge temper, this is where my 4 yr old gets it, and he still doesn't manage anger well. However, he has NEVER done drugs or had a problem with alcohol, and he has NEVER violently lashed out on those he cares about, and is an outstanding member of society. He likes to take his anger out on physical objects instead. People don't always fit into an exact mold, everyone is different.
Not actually giving any real suggestions is a common thing in many trainings and classes I've had! There is a lot of theory out there, but rarely does anyone actually say "try this" or "do that". That's one of things I like about this board. Usually, we run into a lot of the same problems, and many people here can say "this is how I handled it".

It sounds like your DH has learned to manage his anger very well. It may be just his temperment, and he has learned to channel it in a positive way? That may be the key for your son...find out what he enjoys, and use that as an outlet. Maybe playdough, maybe art, maybe a sport, music...?

The point is, he can't necessarily change his feelings, but he can change how he expresses them. By the same token, finding a good outlet may help him be happier, and th..us have less anger.

Gee, that sounds so logical...it's so easy for me to suggest this stuff, it's quite another to live with it!
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Old 05-24-2012, 07:02 AM
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Not actually giving any real suggestions is a common thing in many trainings and classes I've had! There is a lot of theory out there, but rarely does anyone actually say "try this" or "do that". That's one of things I like about this board. Usually, we run into a lot of the same problems, and many people here can say "this is how I handled it".

It sounds like your DH has learned to manage his anger very well. It may be just his temperment, and he has learned to channel it in a positive way? That may be the key for your son...find out what he enjoys, and use that as an outlet. Maybe playdough, maybe art, maybe a sport, music...?

The point is, he can't necessarily change his feelings, but he can change how he expresses them. By the same token, finding a good outlet may help him be happier, and th..us have less anger.

Gee, that sounds so logical...it's so easy for me to suggest this stuff, it's quite another to live with it!
You bring up a good point, Heidi! I just remembered that when I was a teen, I had a big beanbag that I used to punch when I got angry. Perhaps I should get one or make one for my DS; and when his anger gets the best of him let him take it out on the beanbag.
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Old 05-24-2012, 09:39 AM
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You bring up a good point, Heidi! I just remembered that when I was a teen, I had a big beanbag that I used to punch when I got angry. Perhaps I should get one or make one for my DS; and when his anger gets the best of him let him take it out on the beanbag.
how about a soccer bopper (if those still exist) or a punching bag (you could make a smaller home-made one, and some kid sized boxing gloves?
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Old 05-24-2012, 02:32 PM
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Default here are some tips I found...

that one could actually try......

http://www.angermanagementtips.com/children.htm

Anger management clearly needs to be a priority for raising our children.
Research from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and the New York State Psychiatric Institute indicates that child behavior problems are omens of adult partner violence as are severe punishment (abuse) and childhood exposure to abusive relationships between adults.

Another study, completed in 2000, rated childhood tantrums and irritability for children born in 1970. However, the most remarkable information the study uncovered is that children who had been consistently angry in childhood were more likely to be unsatisfied with life at age 30.

The best anger management strategy for children is for you, as a parent, to be a good role model; to familiarize yourself with anger management tips, strategies, and techniques that both help you to cope with the stresses of modern day living as well as being anger management tools to share with your children.

Experts also suggest that to be most effective, anger management for children needs to be implemented before adolescence. Additionally, when a child learns to control his/her anger in pre-teen years, parents reap the benefit of a calmer environment during the child's adolescence!

Anger Management for Infants?
When my daughter was an infant, she frequently woke in a rage, stiffening her body and screaming uncontrollably. When she could stand, she actually threw herself from her crib. Our pediatrician suggested we put her on a blanket in the middle of the floor in a child-safe place and walk away.

One of the hardest things a parent has to do is walk away from a raging child, but it worked. Within just a few days, the rages stopped and our daughter was safe and happy! Her "floor" blanket became one of her favorite friends, which caused me to wonder if Peanuts' Linus had the same problem as an infant.

Unconditional Love - An Exquisite Anger Management Strategy for Children
A father in a supermarket displayed a beautiful expressions of unconditional love that taught bystanders a valuable lesson in anger management for children. His pre-school daughter fell to the floor kicking and screaming in every parent's nightmare, a full-blown in-store temper tantrum. The man scooped the child into his arms and held her to his chest, his strong arms crossed over her small frame as she continued to flail violently against him. He didn't say a word; he just held her close and in moments, the child was at peace. The strength of her father's love alone seemed to calm her.

Helping Children Learn Anger Management
It's important for parents to remember that their children spend just as much time learning about themselves as they do learning about the world around them. Although children need to know that anger is a natural, healthy emotion, they also need to learn that like other emotions - love, sadness, joy - anger needs to be expressed appropriately.

The steps in helping your children learn to manage their anger are the same as the steps for adults. Give them anger management tips for soothing their anger, help them find strategies to stay calm, and teach them techniques for constructively expressing their anger.

The first step in anger management for children is to help your children understand when anger begins. Alert them to the physical symptoms of mounting anger.

Anger makes you breathe faster.
Anger makes your face turn red.
Anger makes your muscles tense and your skin feel tight.
Anger Management Tips for Children


Help children calm down and refocus. Take a deep breath and count to ten. If you're still angry, count further or count backwards from 10 to one.
Give them alternatives to anger.
If a school assignment is too hard, don't get angry; get help from a parent or teacher.
Get a hug... or give one when you feel angry.
Sometimes children can't put their anger into words. Give them some crayons and let them put it on paper. Draw a picture of why you're angry (or a picture of anger)
Work off your child's anger
Treat your child to a pillow fight
Buy them a punch doll
Take them for a walk or bike ride (Don't let angry children ride through the streets alone!)
Reward your child with your attention when they control their anger. Go outside and run around the house five times fast. We'll talk when you come back in!
Finally, tell your child that everyone (even you) gets angry. Part of being a good role model is letting your children know that you are susceptible to anger, too. Let your child know about a time when you were angry and anger management helped you successfully resolve the problem in a positive way.
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Old 05-24-2012, 03:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Heidi View Post
that one could actually try......

http://www.angermanagementtips.com/children.htm

Anger management clearly needs to be a priority for raising our children.
Research from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and the New York State Psychiatric Institute indicates that child behavior problems are omens of adult partner violence as are severe punishment (abuse) and childhood exposure to abusive relationships between adults.

Another study, completed in 2000, rated childhood tantrums and irritability for children born in 1970. However, the most remarkable information the study uncovered is that children who had been consistently angry in childhood were more likely to be unsatisfied with life at age 30.

The best anger management strategy for children is for you, a.aas a parent, to be a good role model; to familiarize yourself with anger management tips, strategies, and techniques that both help you to cope with the stresses of modern day living as well as being anger management tools to share with your children.

Experts also suggest that to be most effective, anger management for children needs to be implemented before adolescence. Additionally, when a child learns to control his/her anger in pre-teen years, parents reap the benefit of a calmer environment during the child's adolescence!

Anger Management for Infants?
When my daughter was an infant, she frequently woke in a rage, stiffening her body and screaming uncontrollably. When she could stand, she actually threw herself from her crib. Our pediatrician suggested we put her on a blanket in the middle of the floor in a child-safe place and walk away.

One of the hardest things a parent has to do is walk away from a raging child, but it worked. Within just a few days, the rages stopped and our daughter was safe and happy! Her "floor" blanket became one of her favorite friends, which caused me to wonder if Peanuts' Linus had the same problem as an infant.

Unconditional Love - An Exquisite Anger Management Strategy for Children
A father in a supermarket displayed a beautiful expressions of unconditional love that taught bystanders a valuable lesson in anger management for children. His pre-school daughter fell to the floor kicking and screaming in every parent's nightmare, a full-blown in-store temper tantrum. The man scooped the child into his arms and held her to his chest, his strong arms crossed over her small frame as she continued to flail violently against him. He didn't say a word; he just held her close and in moments, the child was at peace. The strength of her father's love alone seemed to calm her.

Helping Children Learn Anger Management
It's important for parents to remember that their children spend just as much time learning about themselves as they do learning about the world around them. Although children need to know that anger is a natural, healthy emotion, they also need to learn that like other emotions - love, sadness, joy - anger needs to be expressed appropriately.

The steps in helping your children learn to manage their anger are the same as the steps for adults. Give them anger management tips for soothing their anger, help them find strategies to stay calm, and teach them techniques for constructively expressing their anger.

The first step in anger management for children is to help your children understand when anger begins. Alert them to the physical symptoms of mounting anger.

Anger makes you breathe faster.
Anger makes your face turn red.
Anger makes your muscles tense and your skin feel tight.
Anger Management Tips for Children


Help children calm down and refocus. Take a deep breath and count to ten. If you're still angry, count further or count backwards from 10 to one.
Give them alternatives to anger.
If a school assignment is too hard, don't get angry; get help from a parent or teacher.
Get a hug... or give one when you feel angry.
Sometimes children can't put their anger into words. Give them some crayons and let them put it on paper. Draw a picture of why you're angry (or a picture of anger)
Work off your child's anger
Treat your child to a pillow fight
Buy them a punch doll
Take them for a walk or bike ride (Don't let angry children ride through the streets alone!)
Reward your child with your attention when they control their anger. Go outside and run around the house five times fast. We'll talk when you come back in!
Finally, tell your child that everyone (even you) gets angry. Part of being a good role model is letting your children know that you are susceptible to anger, too. Let your child know about a time when you were angry and anger management helped you successfully resolve the problem in a positive way.
I liked this one a lot better. The tone was less condescending, less "your kid is a raging maniac", and more goal-oriented.

I agree with the authors advice of putting them in a safe place and walking away. I had a very angry four year old this afternoon, who started up right at nap. I kept talking and giving attention to him til I realized I was fueling his fire
I finally picked up his mat and him, and put him in the next room. He screamed for about ten more minutes. Then got up, wiped his nose and told me he was done.
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