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Daycare Center and Family Home Forum>Stocking Over-the-Counter Medications
dolores 08:46 AM 04-09-2021
I'm not authorized to administer prescription medication however, I can administer over the counter medication. The rules say I can have my own stock of OTC meds to use if a child develops symptoms. What, if any, do you stock for daycare kids?
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Blackcat31 08:57 AM 04-09-2021
Originally Posted by dolores:
I'm not authorized to administer prescription medication however, I can administer over the counter medication. The rules say I can have my own stock of OTC meds to use if a child develops symptoms. What, if any, do you stock for daycare kids?
If a child requires OTC meds, they need to be at home.
I don't like the liability of dispensing meds to a child that is not mine and can't think of any situations that would warrant it.

If they get a fever while here, I call for pick up.
If they are in any type of pain that requires medication, I call for pick up.
If they have a cough bad enough to require medication, I exclude from care.

No meds of ANY kind are stored or kept here for that very reason. Too many opportunities for liability for my comfort level.
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dolores 09:11 AM 04-09-2021
Originally Posted by Blackcat31:
If a child requires OTC meds, they need to be at home.
I don't like the liability of dispensing meds to a child that is not mine and can't think of any situations that would warrant it.

If they get a fever while here, I call for pick up.
If they are in any type of pain that requires medication, I call for pick up.
If they have a cough bad enough to require medication, I exclude from care.

No meds of ANY kind are stored or kept here for that very reason. Too many opportunities for liability for my comfort level.
I feel the same. Included in OTC meds is topical ointments, lotions and creams, sprays including sunscreen products and topically applied insect repellant. Might you administer those?
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dolores 09:17 AM 04-09-2021
Oh and how about having an EpiPen on hand to use if a child has a severe reaction to something and can't breath?
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Cat Herder 10:50 AM 04-09-2021
Originally Posted by dolores:
Oh and how about having an EpiPen on hand to use if a child has a severe reaction to something and can't breath?
I require the parent to provide those as they are expensive, dose specific and expire.

I do keep Tylenol, Motrin, Benadryl liquid/cream, hydrocortisone cream, sunscreen, mosquito spray, oatmeal/vapor bath/soak and Neosporin on hand at all times. I have the parents fill out a form in advance and document when I use them, as needed. *I offer mild-ill care (ear/sinus infections, post-surgical, eczema, other non-contagious illness) and treat/prevent minor skin wounds.
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dolores 11:05 AM 04-09-2021
CH do you mind sharing the form your parents sign with me?
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Blackcat31 11:44 AM 04-09-2021
Originally Posted by dolores:
I feel the same. Included in OTC meds is topical ointments, lotions and creams, sprays including sunscreen products and topically applied insect repellant. Might you administer those?
We have a permission to apply form for creams.
In my mind itís different that permission to administer... lol!

If a kid needs an Epi pen, parents would supply along with written prescription and allergy plan.
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Pestle 02:24 PM 04-09-2021
I don't supply up epinephrine autoinjectors, no. They are very expensive and have a short shelf life.

I don't supply diaper ointment or powder. Some parents swear by it but they always swear by some special brand and they all have some finicky way they want it administered, so they have to send it in with instructions.

I don't keep over-the-counter fever reducers. Any child in need of a fever reducer needs to be out of my house.

The only over-the-counter medication I always keep on hand and would administer to a child if necessary is diphehydramine, and I would only do that if we were having a surprise severe allergic reaction and I had already been in contact with the parents. I have had to administer diphenhydramine to my own child, and the parents with known food allergies have sent their kids in with their own bottle.
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Unregistered 06:54 PM 04-09-2021
Same where I work, we dont do ANY otc meds. There are rare exceptions, like the 2 year old with a broken collar bone whos getting Tylenol before nap because she is likey to roll around and cause herself pain.
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Cat Herder 10:58 AM 04-11-2021
Originally Posted by dolores:
CH do you mind sharing the form your parents sign with me?
Sure. It is just a check box form with signatures for over the counter medications. For prescription medications, I use the one from our state site of downloadable mandatory forms. The state allows us to each make our own decision on whether or not to offer OTC treatments. I am "full-care" so would be severely limited without them. The list changes based on the kids some have longer lists, some shorter, based on their needs. This one is pretty common, though and includes my most used products.

I _________ give _________ permission to to dispense the following OTC medications to my child, with my consent via text, email or Daily Connect at the time of administration.
  • Neosporin ____
  • Johnson and Johnson Hurt Free Antiseptic Wash ____
  • Johnson and Johnson Vapor Bath ____
  • Johnson and Johnson Vapor Cream ____
  • Aveeno Colloidal Oatmeal Skin Protectant ____
  • Triple Paste ____
  • Neutrogena Broad Spectrum 70 Sunscreen ____
  • Hydrocortisone Cream ____
  • Benadryl Liquid **Immediate pick-up and medical screening required** ____
  • Benadryl Cream ____
  • Off Outback Woods with DEET ____
  • Tylenol ____
  • Motrin ____
  • Chapstick ____
  • Gold Bond Eczema Relief Cream Fragrance Free ____

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dolores 06:51 AM 04-12-2021
Thank you CH!
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Cat Herder 06:59 AM 04-12-2021
Originally Posted by dolores:
Thank you CH!
Anytime.

I just added a header with my daycare name, license number, address and phone number to the top in a word document. Once I saved it in adobe pdf it made it much, much easier to upload for digital inspections. It took me forever to learn how to "adobe" ($15 a month, too) and update all my documents but it was well worth the effort in virtual inspection ease.
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dolores 06:59 AM 04-12-2021
Originally Posted by Blackcat31:
We have a permission to apply form for creams.
In my mind itís different that permission to administer... lol!

If a kid needs an Epi pen, parents would supply along with written prescription and allergy plan.
...in my mind too! I was using the bureaucratic language in the regs I was reading at the time. Apply sounds so much better!
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Cat Herder 07:03 AM 04-12-2021
Also, here is the link for my states downloadable forms. They are great for editing and adapting to your program. It is all paid for by tax dollars, so using them is perfectly ok and recommended. http://www.decal.ga.gov/BftS/FormList.aspx
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Cat Herder 07:06 AM 04-12-2021
Originally Posted by dolores:
...in my mind too! I was using the bureaucratic language in the regs I was reading at the time. Apply sounds so much better!
The reason I started it was because the public school used that language to try to suspend my kid for having grape flavored Chapstick in his pocket. The letter home accused me of sending him to school with "medication".

I figured it was good practice for my daycare parents if the schools are going to be that ridiculous. They need to be of that mindset early.
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