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Daycare Center and Family Home Forum>Dose and Drop For... No Fever?
Unregistered 06:36 AM 03-14-2014
Mom came in. Holding baby.
Dcm- are you comfortable giving him Tylenol?
Me- if I THOUGHT it was for teething, but if he has a fever I'm calling you
Dcm- ohhhh... Welllllll I have him Tylenol this am but no fever just off behavior


I am NOT comfortable with this. How do I know that there was no free? Baby has glassy eyes. Feels a little warm. As soon as breakfast is out away I'm taking a temp. I JUST sent out new illness policies w over 99 beig go/stay home.

This is this moms second admitted dose and drop. She just does NOT get it. Suggestions? Is this ok?
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MotherNature 09:00 AM 03-14-2014
So she gave the baby Tylenol b/c the baby seemed a little off? That's totally unacceptable. Don't medicate small kids b/c they seem a bit off! I'm not buying mom's story. If you've lready told her not to dose & drop, and with your recent illness flyer, I'd term her. She knows what she did and since you're saying the baby is out of sorts, no way I'd have taken that baby in after mom did that.
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Cat Herder 09:05 AM 03-14-2014
Originally Posted by Unregistered:
This is this moms second admitted dose and drop. She just does NOT get it. Suggestions? Is this ok?
Don't let her.

I know it seems simple, but THAT is the solution. Enforce your policies.
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Blackcat31 09:25 AM 03-14-2014
Originally Posted by Cat Herder:
Don't let her.

I know it seems simple, but THAT is the solution. Enforce your policies.
The solution is always simple.

It's the actual "doing" that seems to be impossible for a lot of providers.

I don't know how to bridge that gap.
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CraftyMom 09:29 AM 03-14-2014
Originally Posted by Blackcat31:
The solution is always simple.

It's the actual "doing" that seems to be impossible for a lot of providers.

I don't know how to bridge that gap.
I agree, so often providers know what they SHOULD do, but then when it comes down to it and it's time to enforce we back down. I am guilty myself.
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Cat Herder 09:30 AM 03-14-2014
Originally Posted by Blackcat31:
I don't know how to bridge that gap.
It has to happen to most so many times that they get angry. Until then they think they are being mean by holding people to standards.

I have noticed they get there faster when it is their own child that catches whatever the dope & drop parent brought in.
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Blackcat31 09:34 AM 03-14-2014
Originally Posted by CraftyMom:
I agree, so often providers know what they SHOULD do, but then when it comes down to it and it's time to enforce we back down. I am guilty myself.
I think the answer is personal. I think in each situation, a provider has to answer her own question of WHY. Why are you (general you) afraid to follow through? What is it that stops you from doing what you know you need to do?

KWIM? I think for a lot of providers it comes down to a couple of things:

I think if providers could identify that root, then they can move forward and implement a plan of action. But until provider recognize (and admit) what the root of their fear is, things won't change.

...or worse, the resentment builds to a boiling point and then when $h1t hits the fan, it is explosive and chaotic as well as emotional.
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Blackcat31 09:38 AM 03-14-2014
Originally Posted by Cat Herder:
It has to happen to most so many times that they get angry. Until then they think they are being mean by holding people to standards.

I have noticed they get there faster when it is their own child that catches whatever the dope & drop parent brought in.
See, that is what I try to avoid. NOTHING good comes from anger but developing a good plan of action BEFORE the anger comes into play is what all providers should be doing.

I think we tend to judge others by their actions but ourselves by our intentions and that ultimately leads to resentment and anger when the other party doesn't act according to how we think they should.

I prefer to stop the train before it reaches the anger depot.

I try to tell my kids that too.... being proactive will save you a ton of grief in life verses being reactive.

I just wish I could help providers get past that road block.
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Unregistered 09:39 AM 03-14-2014
Originally Posted by MotherNature:
So she gave the baby Tylenol b/c the baby seemed a little off? That's totally unacceptable. Don't medicate small kids b/c they seem a bit off! I'm not buying mom's story. If you've lready told her not to dose & drop, and with your recent illness flyer, I'd term her. She knows what she did and since you're saying the baby is out of sorts, no way I'd have taken that baby in after mom did that.
Baby has been constipated and fussy.
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EntropyControlSpecialist 09:45 AM 03-14-2014
Originally Posted by Blackcat31:
I think the answer is personal. I think in each situation, a provider has to answer her own question of WHY. Why are you (general you) afraid to follow through? What is it that stops you from doing what you know you need to do?

KWIM? I think for a lot of providers it comes down to a couple of things:
  • fear of losing income
  • fear of DCF not liking them or thinking they are mean/not nice
  • fear of having that or any uncomfortable conversation

I think if providers could identify that root, then they can move forward and implement a plan of action. But until provider recognize (and admit) what the root of their fear is, things won't change.

...or worse, the resentment builds to a boiling point and then when $h1t hits the fan, it is explosive and chaotic as well as emotional.
...and it ALWAYS hits the fan if you don't confront the first infraction or two.
For me, I struggle with irritating the parents so much so that they leave (I DO it but I fret sometimes). In the second year I began really following my illness policy/late fees/etc. and I feel MUCH happier. The parents that fight back anyways are the ones who stress me.
I have NEVER had a family leave because I enforced my policies.
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Unregistered 09:46 AM 03-14-2014
Originally Posted by Cat Herder:
Don't let her.

I know it seems simple, but THAT is the solution. Enforce your policies.
I have a fever policy. I do not have a medication before care policy, I guess I should have mentioned that!

Guess I am adding that. I am thinking that I will say at PU,

"DCM, I know you want baby to be happy, but it's not acceptable to give a dosage and then drop because I don't know what is going on. I a child is feeling bad enough to need medicine then they can't come to daycare."


Baby passed out and woke up fine, so maybe there was no legit fever...
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daycarediva 10:38 AM 03-14-2014
If a child needs pain reliever/fever reducer, they are too sick for care. End of story. I would have stopped her at "I gave him Tylenol..." and told her to take him home.


I just had a true dope and drop, and it wiped out EVERY CHILD ENROLLED. I am livid, and if I had proof, I would have termed immediately. As it is, they got (everyone else, just in case) a warning.
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TwinKristi 10:44 AM 03-14-2014
I would remind her that medication should be reserved for a good reason, not just because. And if it's in your contract then follow it and give her a written warning not to dose before care. If she's unsure tell you and you can send him home it he's sick but if he's dosed and it covers illness that doesn't help anyone.

Added-Didn't see a lot of the replies while I was typing and busy and forgot... If you have no policy you can't be mad. You need to adopt a policy and stick to it. I would tell her this isn't okay and not to do it again or she'll not be able to return.
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Unregistered 12:24 PM 03-14-2014
Originally Posted by TwinKristi:
I would remind her that medication should be reserved for a good reason, not just because. And if it's in your contract then follow it and give her a written warning not to dose before care. If she's unsure tell you and you can send him home it he's sick but if he's dosed and it covers illness that doesn't help anyone.

Added-Didn't see a lot of the replies while I was typing and busy and forgot... If you have no policy you can't be mad. You need to adopt a policy and stick to it. I would tell her this isn't okay and not to do it again or she'll not be able to return.
I definitely am!!!

I gess I should have known... I come from the school of thought that if your kid needs pain relief... They need to be home!
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MotherNature 07:58 PM 03-14-2014
tylenol doesn't help constipation. It can actually make it worse. Try a tiny bit of juice or a tip of a suppository ( and watch out when it clears. yikes.)
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Tags:enforcing policies - consistency, illness policy, illness policy - samples, infectious teething, provider accountability
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