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  #1  
Old 09-29-2012, 09:25 AM
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Default Thinking Of Trying Montessori Style

I know I saw this posted before but I. Ouldnt find it when I searched the threads. I want to learn moreabout montessori methods. Ibought a book through amazon but it was very dry and focused on the research not how to set up a classroom materials needed etc. I really want a book like that. Preferably one that focuses on ages 3-6. Anyone know of any good books or manuals
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  #2  
Old 09-29-2012, 09:41 AM
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I have a TON of books! I will look at them this weekend and then let you know which ones I think are really good and useful. I refer to MANY of mine on a regular basis but can't really think of one that is the best or must have!

I spend alot of time reading blogs and websites to get ideas for activities and such to do with my DCK's

So until I sort through all my books here is a list of really great sites (some blogs/some informational) that are all worth the read and super helpful in using the Montessori method with your daycare

http://howwemontessori.typepad.com/
http://www.montessori.org/
http://thecuriousmindsmontessori.org/ourbeginning.html
http://www.montessorimom.com/what-montessori-method/
http://www.montessorimaterials.org/index.html
http://www.michaelolaf.net/1CW312MI.html#Prepared
http://www.montessorilive.net/
http://www.montessorifortheearth.com/
http://www.preschool-lessonplans-and...ri-method.html
http://www.infomontessori.com/index.htm
http://montessoriconfessions.blogspot.com/
http://spiralmontessorimama.blogspot.com/
http://mymontessorijourney.typepad.com/
http://www.montessoriathomebook.com/Home.html/blog/
http://thefullmontessori.wordpress.com/
http://montessorihouse.blogspot.com/

HTH
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Old 09-29-2012, 09:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Nickel View Post
I know I saw this posted before but I. Ouldnt find it when I searched the threads. I want to learn moreabout montessori methods. Ibought a book through amazon but it was very dry and focused on the research not how to set up a classroom materials needed etc. I really want a book like that. Preferably one that focuses on ages 3-6. Anyone know of any good books or manuals
I am also trying to learn to teach this method too and want to set up this way...

Not sure how to get certified in it or where to go to take classes
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Old 09-29-2012, 09:42 AM
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I am also trying to learn to teach this method too and want to set up this way...

Not sure how to get certified in it or where to go to take classes
Oooh, I can help with that too but I am on my phone so I will try and PM you the info later
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Old 09-29-2012, 09:48 AM
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Oooh, I can help with that too but I am on my phone so I will try and PM you the info later
ooohh woman you know I love you!!!!
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Old 09-29-2012, 09:52 AM
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WOW! Thanks blackcat! I will start going through them! And I would love information on getting certified as well. It's something I really want to do with my child. I did have another question. I know they level is 3-6 but traditionally children start school when they are 5. So if I did "kindergarten" at home through the montessori method do i have to notify the school board? And would it really benefit her if she was the only one that age in her "class?"

Thanks again!
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Old 09-29-2012, 11:51 AM
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I love doing Montessori trays for the children. They love them and the kids always ask for more. Usually, I do four different ones per week and the practical life ones are my favourite. I also have at least 3 different sensory bins on the go, but I only change one up per week (it can get expensive). This week I have a cloud dough bin, a green sand bin and a blue rice bin. I just changed out the fall bin (pine cones, silk sunflowers, wax leaves, bird nests, flower vase, silk leaves and fill), etc, I would have kept it longer, but the children seemed tired of it.
I have a pinterest board with 184 repins I found for different Montessori trays. If you don't have Pinterest yet you really should. TONS of ideas there.
Have fun!!
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Old 09-29-2012, 02:23 PM
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What's ur Pinterest sparrow so I can "follow" u
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Old 09-29-2012, 04:11 PM
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What's ur Pinterest sparrow so I can "follow" u
http://pinterest.com/scrapbooknook/
There are also a board for sensory bins and different craft ideas. The board re this post is called Montessori Trays
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  #10  
Old 09-29-2012, 06:17 PM
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lady, you are so organized on pintrest, I'm going to follow you (I'm the one with the 4 kids)
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Old 09-29-2012, 06:49 PM
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I just followed all too! So many cool ideas!
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Old 09-30-2012, 02:31 PM
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I don't know very much at all about Montessori. The tiny bit I did read stated that they don't have creative play, crafts or outdoor play. Very much everything I do
But like I said, I know very very little about it. I read that little bit on it in a ECE textbook and knew it wasn't for me. It will be interesting to see what others post about it.
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Old 09-30-2012, 07:33 PM
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Originally Posted by DaisyMamma View Post
I don't know very much at all about Montessori. The tiny bit I did read stated that they don't have creative play, crafts or outdoor play. Very much everything I do
But like I said, I know very very little about it. I read that little bit on it in a ECE textbook and knew it wasn't for me. It will be interesting to see what others post about it.
How incredibly odd......

Not at all sure what that ECE textbook was about but there is nothing that says no creative play, crafts or outdoor play in Montessori education that I've ever heard.

In fact, it holds heavy emphasis on imaginative play and exploring in nature, and of course that means being outside. Exploration with minimal intrusion from the teacher is key. Montessori education largely rejects technology as television and computers and such are seen to hinder the child's creative process. A child is encouraged to come up with their own ideas and are allowed to develop their own cognitive processes needed to successfully accomplish the "work" they do...."work" being the word used instead of play because it is as respected as an adults work in life. It is equally as important in the life of a child because of what a child can learn and accomplish through it.



I suggest you read more about it before making such inaccurate and slanderous statements! You make it sounds as if children in Montessori environments must be miserable prisoners of their teachers!
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Old 10-01-2012, 05:05 AM
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How incredibly odd......

Not at all sure what that ECE textbook was about but there is nothing that says no creative play, crafts or outdoor play in Montessori education that I've ever heard.

In fact, it holds heavy emphasis on imaginative play and exploring in nature, and of course that means being outside. Exploration with minimal intrusion from the teacher is key. Montessori education largely rejects technology as television and computers and such are seen to hinder the child's creative process. A child is encouraged to come up with their own ideas and are allowed to develop their own cognitive processes needed to successfully accomplish the "work" they do...."work" being the word used instead of play because it is as respected as an adults work in life. It is equally as important in the life of a child because of what a child can learn and accomplish through it.



I suggest you read more about it before making such inaccurate and slanderous statements! You make it sounds as if children in Montessori environments must be miserable prisoners of their teachers!
Seriously??? How bizarre! I'm going to do some research later. LOL
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Old 10-01-2012, 06:07 AM
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Originally Posted by DaisyMamma View Post
I don't know very much at all about Montessori. The tiny bit I did read stated that they don't have creative play, crafts or outdoor play. Very much everything I do
But like I said, I know very very little about it. I read that little bit on it in a ECE textbook and knew it wasn't for me. It will be interesting to see what others post about it.
I know people who have this set up and LOOOVE it. I have also read a few things that make me think it's not quite for me/my group. I could research, but really, if it ain't broke....That said if things were not working, then I would totally be open to reading good solid research on the subject to see if I'm missing something and if it would work.
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Old 10-01-2012, 06:38 AM
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I know people who have this set up and LOOOVE it.
If they are set up like that then they aren't a Montessori.

What she describes isn't Montessori anything. At all.



And the methods are not utilized because there is necessarily any sort of need for improvement or identified problem with what they're currently doing. Sometimes a provider wonders if just because things seem great if there might not be even more room for further enrichment. Or sometimes they have the opportunity to see the difference between kids doing perfectly fine in a given environment and those *thriving* in a Montessori. It's hard to see room for improvement unless you are incredibly humble to the idea there might be room for some, are very imaginative (is the sky really the limit?) or have a chance to literally see the differences side by side.


I thought the way my parents raised me was fine. I turned out quite well. Then I had the chance to nanny children not just being schooled in a Montessori but literally living the life.......the difference between them and every other child I had ever babysat, nannied for and taught (elementary ed.) was SHOCKING.

I had never even considered there might be any room for improvement before the differences were right there in front of me plain as day.

Believe me, they are obvious.
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  #17  
Old 10-01-2012, 07:48 AM
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If they are set up like that then they aren't a Montessori.

What she describes isn't Montessori anything. At all.



And the methods are not utilized because there is necessarily any sort of need for improvement or identified problem with what they're currently doing. Sometimes a provider wonders if just because things seem great if there might not be even more room for further enrichment. Or sometimes they have the opportunity to see the difference between kids doing perfectly fine in a given environment and those *thriving* in a Montessori. It's hard to see room for improvement unless you are incredibly humble to the idea there might be room for some, are very imaginative (is the sky really the limit?) or have a chance to literally see the differences side by side.


I thought the way my parents raised me was fine. I turned out quite well. Then I had the chance to nanny children not just being schooled in a Montessori but literally living the life.......the difference between them and every other child I had ever babysat, nannied for and taught (elementary ed.) was SHOCKING.

I had never even considered there might be any room for improvement before the differences were right there in front of me plain as day.

Believe me, they are obvious.
Just a thought, perhaps instead of name calling and judegments about others, you can use the time to educate about what is so wonderful about Montessori. Perhaps you might find other more receptive. Getting more with honey and all...
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:13 AM
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There are 6 basic concepts to the Montessori method:

1). Natural, inner guidance: All children have unique, innate directives that come from within to guide them in the natural course of their development

2). Self-directed learning: Children are competent, capable beings and can direct their own learning, choosing their activities and duration of engagement with them. This creates the most natural way for the children to learn and express their unique potentials, talents, skills, and interests. It also encourages the child to maintain their natural joy of learning.

3). Prepared environment: The conditions for children to be able to follow their inner guidance and self-direct their learning must be created to support this process. This means providing an environment with a variety of objects that are accessible and easily available for free and independent use.

4). Observation and indirect teaching: The teacher does not lead lectures or read from books, and rarely leads large-group activities. Rather, the teacher observes the children in order to continually modify the environment to suit the childrens' needs. The teacher also provides one-on-one instruction when a child has reached a point where they are ready for a new lesson or the introduction of a new concept.

5). Learning through all the senses: The activities and things available in the classroom for childrens' self-directed learning are designed to allow for learning through all of the senses, rather than just listening or reading. This helps to create a process of discovery, which fosters the development of concentration, motivation, self-discipline, and ultimately a love of learning.

6). Grouped learning: rather than being divided up by each year, the children are put into mixed groups by age and ability, usually in three or six year age spans. This allows for socialization and normalization, and both older and younger children teach and learn from one another.


The implementation of these concepts are spread out over 6 areas of the classroom:
  • Practical Life
  • Sensorial
  • Language
  • Math
  • Geopgraphy
  • Science

The basic idea behind the Montessori method of teaching is:

Children are capable of self-directed learning.

The teacher is an observer of the child, rather than a lecturer to the child.

In each child there resides a 'sensitive period' in which they are particularly open to learning a specific skill or type of knowledge. At these times, learning is effortless and joyful.

Children learn by doing. By using Montessori specific materials the child is able to learn and correct their own mistakes without input from the teacher.

So in a sense those of you who do not necessarily have a strictly structured day and allow for the children to play freely for a large portion of the day and learn from that play are already using a very primative style of Montessori teaching.

I don't run a 100% Montessori environment but I absolutely have a Montessori "inspired" environment and one that is a work in progress towards becoming 100%.
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:51 AM
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Thanks for all of the info on this thread! Love all of the ideas on pinterest! There is such a wealth of great ideas!

Also, I have never understood what Montessori teaching was all about and learned something new!
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:54 AM
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Just a thought, perhaps instead of name calling and judegments about others, you can use the time to educate about what is so wonderful about Montessori. Perhaps you might find other more receptive. Getting more with honey and all...
Hmmmm.....I don't see where I was name calling or being judgmental at all.....

And I didn't think you were interested in learning any more about it because you already said it wasn't for you and as you so put it:

"I could research, but really, if it ain't broke...."




I'll admit I felt more than a little defensive because some pretty offensive and incorrect statements were being made about what I aspire my daycare to be, but other than that it was just sharing my personal experience in concluding that Montessori is what is best for the kids I care for.


If someone wrongly pegged that your methods and theories bar the children in your care from ever going outside or engaging in creative play or crafts when so much of what you do is EXACTLY that would you not have a similar "WOAH now.....hold the flipping phone!!!!" reaction?





Blackcat gave a bunch of excellent resources above your comments. Kudos to her for that for those who are actually interested in learning more

(I totally bookmarked the My Montessori Journey blog one BC, I hadn't seen that one before....and I am so making her feather button turkey tonight!)
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Old 10-01-2012, 09:04 AM
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Just a thought, perhaps instead of name calling and judegments about others, you can use the time to educate about what is so wonderful about Montessori. Perhaps you might find other more receptive. Getting more with honey and all...
I agree. I was a bit offended by the response to my post as well. Being called slanderous and all. When I clearly stated I didn't know anything else on the subject and was looking forward to reading the responses.
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Old 10-01-2012, 09:09 AM
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Hmmmm.....I don't see where I was name calling or being judgmental at all.....

And I didn't think you were interested in learning any more about it because you already said it wasn't for you and as you so put it:

"I could research, but really, if it ain't broke...."




I'll admit I felt more than a little defensive because some pretty offensive and incorrect statements were being made about what I aspire my daycare to be, but other than that it was just sharing my personal experience in concluding that Montessori is what is best for the kids I care for.


If someone wrongly pegged that your methods and theories bar the children in your care from ever going outside or engaging in creative play or crafts when so much of what you do is EXACTLY that would you not have a similar "WOAH now.....hold the flipping phone!!!!" reaction?





Blackcat gave a bunch of excellent resources above your comments. Kudos to her for that for those who are actually interested in learning more

(I totally bookmarked the My Montessori Journey blog one BC, I hadn't seen that one before....and I am so making her feather button turkey tonight!)
Insinuating that someone who does not feel the need for Montessori "lacks imgination" is akin to name calling. All the hmms, and umms, will not take away that. All I said was that the little I read it wasn't for me/my group. So educate me...Blackcat did post some links, I'll certainly take a look. But no where did I give any reason WHY I didn't feel it was for me, so I was not "pegging" anything.
Not every method works for every situation, and if it works for you/your group that's wonderful.
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  #23  
Old 10-01-2012, 09:46 AM
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Insinuating that someone who does not feel the need for Montessori "lacks imgination" is akin to name calling.

Good thing I NEVER said or insinuated that then!


What I did say:

"It's hard to see room for improvement unless you are incredibly humble to the idea there might be room for some, are very imaginative (is the sky really the limit?) or have a chance to literally see the differences side by side."


is in reference to all areas of life...not just daycare in general or someone considering Montessori specifically.

The one that comes to my mind first and foremost is pet nutrition to me funny enough.


I thought my dogs were doing awesome on grocery store brands (Purina, Iams, Pedigree, Science Diet). If anyone would have asked me then there was zero room for improvement. I had no reason to research alternatives because I thought what I was doing was the ideal. It wasn't until I was confronted with information that challenged me to compare that I even considered there might be room for improvement, and even then I was pretty oppositional to it. I loved my dogs. Of course I was offering them the best!

Turns out I was not perfect after all and there was room for improvement. Much more so than I ever anticipated. Even now that I've completely revamped how I feed my pets I still keep an open mind to what might be out there that could be even better - even though - it is hard for me to fathom even better beyond this.



Same goes for what I eat, how I take care of my lawn, my hair products, and of course the way I care for kids.


What I wrote there had nothing to do with anyone else. There was no ulterior motive, message or sideways implications.The "you" was general and no one else entered my mind except for myself and how I as an individual challenge myself to think and be in life. It's how I attempt to be the best I can be. Without humility, an open mind/creative imagination and a willingness to see improvement where you (one?) originally thought there was one there's no way any improvements can ever be made - even if there are plenty of areas that can be bumped up a notch.
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Old 10-01-2012, 10:01 AM
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Good thing I NEVER said or insinuated that then!


What I did say:

"It's hard to see room for improvement unless you are incredibly humble to the idea there might be room for some, are very imaginative (is the sky really the limit?) or have a chance to literally see the differences side by side."


is in reference to all areas of life...not just daycare in general or someone considering Montessori specifically.

The one that comes to my mind first and foremost is pet nutrition to me funny enough.


I thought my dogs were doing awesome on grocery store brands (Purina, Iams, Pedigree, Science Diet). If anyone would have asked me then there was zero room for improvement. I had no reason to research alternatives because I thought what I was doing was the ideal. It wasn't until I was confronted with information that challenged me to compare that I even considered there might be room for improvement, and even then I was pretty oppositional to it. I loved my dogs. Of course I was offering them the best!

Turns out I was not perfect after all and there was room for improvement. Much more so than I ever anticipated. Even now that I've completely revamped how I feed my pets I still keep an open mind to what might be out there that could be even better - even though - it is hard for me to fathom even better beyond this.



Same goes for what I eat, how I take care of my lawn, my hair products, and of course the way I care for kids.


What I wrote there had nothing to do with anyone else. There was no ulterior motive, message or sideways implications.The "you" was general and no one else entered my mind except for myself and how I as an individual challenge myself to think and be in life. It's how I attempt to be the best I can be. Without humility, an open mind/creative imagination and a willingness to see improvement where you (one?) originally thought there was one there's no way any improvements can ever be made - even if there are plenty of areas that can be bumped up a notch.
I agree that looking into things is a great way to improve your life, work, etc. But I also admitted that (admittedly) the little I've read about it doesn't scream WONDERFUL to me. And that's okay.
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Old 10-01-2012, 10:09 AM
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BC, you had mentioned that you know where to take classes or to get certified....any news on this??

thanks so much
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Old 10-01-2012, 10:12 AM
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I agree that looking into things is a great way to improve your life, work, etc. But I also admitted that (admittedly) the little I've read about it doesn't scream WONDERFUL to me. And that's okay.

Oh don't get me wrong, it's fine if you read about what it actually is and decided it wasn't for you. What's not fair however is when someone declares something something it's not based on limited and/or inaccurate information.



No different than someone saying they've decided they'd never do licensed daycare or put their child in one because they read once somewhere that daycare kids are all violent heathens and all the providers do is sit on their butts watching soaps and eating bon-bons all day....and then saying they're not at all interested in learning anything about it beyond that because their mind is already made up.

That would be offensive to everything a real provider actually is and the very sweet way most daycare kids are, right?



This conversation no different.
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Old 10-01-2012, 10:14 AM
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BC, you had mentioned that you know where to take classes or to get certified....any news on this??

thanks so much
Oopsie, forgot to post the link

Here ya go....there are many places to become certified but most require seat time and are very time consuming, especially for those of us who wish to maintain a financial income while furthering our educations.... On-line IS the best option for that.

http://www.montessoritraining.net/about_us/overview.htm

HTH
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Old 10-01-2012, 10:15 AM
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I agree that looking into things is a great way to improve your life, work, etc. But I also admitted that (admittedly) the little I've read about it doesn't scream WONDERFUL to me. And that's okay.
It is ok.
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Old 10-01-2012, 10:31 AM
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Oh don't get me wrong, it's fine if you read about what it actually is and decided it wasn't for you. What's not fair however is when someone declares something something it's not based on limited and/or inaccurate information.



No different than someone saying they've decided they'd never do licensed daycare or put their child in one because they read once somewhere that daycare kids are all violent heathens and all the providers do is sit on their butts watching soaps and eating bon-bons all day....and then saying they're not at all interested in learning anything about it beyond that because their mind is already made up.

That would be offensive to everything a real provider actually is and the very sweet way most daycare kids are, right?



This conversation no different.
Well, thanks for your permission. I had NO idea that there is only one right way! Your way. And clearly if I were more educated, had done more research I would have known it all along.
Hey everyone! From now on, let's just not bother with asking for kind, balanced advice - we'll just ask Willow!
We bow to thee, Oh Queen of all things Day Care!!

Now with that, I must bow out. I've got work to do.
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Old 10-01-2012, 10:38 AM
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Oopsie, forgot to post the link

Here ya go....there are many places to become certified but most require seat time and are very time consuming, especially for those of us who wish to maintain a financial income while furthering our educations.... On-line IS the best option for that.

http://www.montessoritraining.net/about_us/overview.htm

HTH
wow, I did not think that it would be so costly. This is just to get certified correct? Then I will need to also purchase all of the equipment too correct?
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Old 10-01-2012, 11:06 AM
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I think the problem with montessorri is that its all about problem sloving. Look at all the pictures, go see the places. They stress over and over that they want kids to figure things out. Which is great and I do that here, but I also offer them other things. I also find that all they do is teach knowledgable stuff, like people around the world, they know everything about it.
I like to take components from montessori and mix it with my own stuff, its like a balance. Also, right now, I have all younger children, montessori would not work for them, heck if we can get thru the day with just not fighting over a toy I'm doing well for the day.
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Old 10-01-2012, 11:14 AM
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Ummmm.. i started the thread to learn more about montessori methods, not to cause a debate. If you all have resources, websites, names of books, i would love to hear about it. It is something i would like to try with my daycare. Not every style ot method is rigjt for every provider, child, school. So lets agree to disagree.

Now if anyonr has a book list. I am definitely a touch it see it read it mark it kind of girl. I live my highlighters! Lol
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Old 10-01-2012, 11:15 AM
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wow, I did not think that it would be so costly. This is just to get certified correct? Then I will need to also purchase all of the equipment too correct?
Yes, it is rather spendy to do...that is the only downside. Well, I suppose the cost of toys too but I guess I figured since my DH is a woodworker, I hadn't considered that cost.

If you don't want to actually go the whole certification route, you could still self-study and learn the methods and ideas and then incorporate them into your program.
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Old 10-01-2012, 11:23 AM
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Yes, it is rather spendy to do...that is the only downside. Well, I suppose the cost of toys too but I guess I figured since my DH is a woodworker, I hadn't considered that cost.

If you don't want to actually go the whole certification route, you could still self-study and learn the methods and ideas and then incorporate them into your program.
I wish my husband knew how to do any form of handy work. Only firefighter I know that is not a good handy man...lol sorry did I say that out loud?

I guess I could always do that too, but I am not good at teaching myself much....lol
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Old 10-01-2012, 11:30 AM
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Ummmm.. i started the thread to learn more about montessori methods, not to cause a debate. If you all have resources, websites, names of books, i would love to hear about it. It is something i would like to try with my daycare. Not every style ot method is rigjt for every provider, child, school. So lets agree to disagree.

Now if anyonr has a book list. I am definitely a touch it see it read it mark it kind of girl. I live my highlighters! Lol
Here are a few of my favorite books. I looked on Amazon.com too to see if they were still in print and available..which ALL of them are so I provided the link to them as well.

Those should keep you busy for a while. If you are looking for anything in a specific area or topic, let me know. I have shelves of books about Montessori. Some textbook, some easy to read and follow and others...just plain intersting.
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Old 10-01-2012, 11:33 AM
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There are 6 basic concepts to the Montessori method:

1). Natural, inner guidance: All children have unique, innate directives that come from within to guide them in the natural course of their development

2). Self-directed learning: Children are competent, capable beings and can direct their own learning, choosing their activities and duration of engagement with them. This creates the most natural way for the children to learn and express their unique potentials, talents, skills, and interests. It also encourages the child to maintain their natural joy of learning.Is this a set up for a downfall towards the real world and how the "norm" operates? Always being able to do what you want when you want? Real life is not that way.

3). Prepared environment: The conditions for children to be able to follow their inner guidance and self-direct their learning must be created to support this process. This means providing an environment with a variety of objects that are accessible and easily available for free and independent use.

4). Observation and indirect teaching: The teacher does not lead lectures or read from books, and rarely leads large-group activities. Rather, the teacher observes the children in order to continually modify the environment to suit the childrens' needs. The teacher also provides one-on-one instruction when a child has reached a point where they are ready for a new lesson or the introduction of a new concept. The teacher doesn't read books? How can a child know what a child does not know? I love exploration but there is more to learning then exploration.

5). Learning through all the senses: The activities and things available in the classroom for childrens' self-directed learning are designed to allow for learning through all of the senses, rather than just listening or reading. This helps to create a process of discovery, which fosters the development of concentration, motivation, self-discipline, and ultimately a love of learning.

6). Grouped learning: rather than being divided up by each year, the children are put into mixed groups by age and ability, usually in three or six year age spans. This allows for socialization and normalization, and both older and younger children teach and learn from one another.


The implementation of these concepts are spread out over 6 areas of the classroom:
  • Practical Life
  • Sensorial
  • Language
  • Math
  • Geopgraphy
  • Science

The basic idea behind the Montessori method of teaching is:

Children are capable of self-directed learning.

The teacher is an observer of the child, rather than a lecturer to the child.

In each child there resides a 'sensitive period' in which they are particularly open to learning a specific skill or type of knowledge. At these times, learning is effortless and joyful.

Children learn by doing. By using Montessori specific materials the child is able to learn and correct their own mistakes without input from the teacher.

So in a sense those of you who do not necessarily have a strictly structured day and allow for the children to play freely for a large portion of the day and learn from that play are already using a very primative style of Montessori teaching.

I don't run a 100% Montessori environment but I absolutely have a Montessori "inspired" environment and one that is a work in progress towards becoming 100%.
I just wanted to comment on a bit of this..... I am inspired by the Montessori approach. For myself I like to mix it up to make it my own and use what works when it works. I am very laid back but like things that I like.I like to talk with the children, read to them and engage with them and facilitate play.

The rest of the picking here is taking away from this interesting subject. Makes me feel like I just went back to middle school and again takes away from the interest here. Can we just let the picking at each other go?

I will respond above in red........and hope I don't come across as a picker myself.

Thank you-
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Old 10-01-2012, 11:57 AM
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Oooh, I can help with that too but I am on my phone so I will try and PM you the info later
he he...on the phone with who????lol
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Old 10-01-2012, 12:00 PM
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Here are a few of my favorite books. I looked on Amazon.com too to see if they were still in print and available..which ALL of them are so I provided the link to them as well.

Those should keep you busy for a while. If you are looking for anything in a specific area or topic, let me know. I have shelves of books about Montessori. Some textbook, some easy to read and follow and others...just plain intersting.
Thanks Black cat! You are a life saver! I will add these to my wishlist and leave some BIG hints for my husband!
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Old 10-01-2012, 12:25 PM
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he he...on the phone with who????lol
Oh, just someone I was really really looking forward to meeting IRL,

but the wonderful weather up here in our area of the country even has a hand in those kinds of plans.

Hopefully, we can just make plans for another time...maybe in much warmer weather.
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Old 10-01-2012, 12:54 PM
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I just wanted to comment on a bit of this..... I am inspired by the Montessori approach. For myself I like to mix it up to make it my own and use what works when it works. I am very laid back but like things that I like.I like to talk with the children, read to them and engage with them and facilitate play.

The rest of the picking here is taking away from this interesting subject. Makes me feel like I just went back to middle school and again takes away from the interest here. Can we just let the picking at each other go?

I will respond above in red........and hope I don't come across as a picker myself.

Thank you-
Is this a set up for a downfall towards the real world and how the "norm" operates? Always being able to do what you want when you want? Real life is not that way

It is really deeper than that. The whole approach teaches children to not only do things on their own but to be motivated to do them. It also helps them be responsible for their choices and actually does the exact opposite of setting them up for failure and sets them up for success since they learn very early on that they ARE capable beings and are capable beings of doing things independently. It also teaches the children to try and not be afraid of trying things. Their own minds/brains do hold the key, they just need to be given the tools and the time to figure it out.

The teacher doesn't read books? How can a child know what a child does not know? I love exploration but there is more to learning then exploration.

It isn't that the teacher doesn't read books to the kids, it is that she doesn't teach from textbooks like seen in traditional classrooms. Books (children's) are a huge part of the Montessori classroom.

As far as learning to read/write, the Montessori approach to reading and literacy is much different than what you think about general about learning literacy skills.

Maria Montessori recognized that children as young as two had an interest in written letters. The "sandpaper letters" (letters cut out of sandpaper that can be traced) were developed to take advantage of this sensitive period. Montessori had an advantage when teaching in Italy; Italian is mostly phonetic. Once the basic phonetic sounds were learned, reading proceeded quite easily.

Montessori also observed that writing usually proceeded reading. When a child writes, all they need to do is turn sounds into letters. When a child reads, they need to pull apart the letters, turn them into phonetic sounds, and put them back together to make a word. It's a more complicated process. Children in Montessori classrooms often write stories with the movable alphabet long before they can read.

Hope that helps explain it a bit better.
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Old 10-01-2012, 02:28 PM
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Any one interested in really affordable materials I've ordered from a seller called "allergybegone" off ebay quite a few times.

They have loads of great brand new items (Melissa and Doug fanatics - HUGE selection) that work a wide variety of skills, are ridiculously inexpensive compared to retail and many have free shipping to boot.


I invest about $50 every month or so, the kids help me pick out what we're going to order. When the box comes you'd think it was Christmas morning


This is where I got my start playing around with the idea of which materials I wanted and why, it was incredibly helpful. Even if you're not interested in going all in 100% they have some great suggestions that help develop a wide variety of skills and explanations as to why/how they aid the child is accomplishing them:
http://montessoritoys.com/toy-reviews/
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Old 10-01-2012, 04:30 PM
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Can you send me a link to one of her products. Or please explain how to search for a seller? I haven't used ebay in forever, but I wounldn't mind picking up some discounted items.
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Old 10-01-2012, 04:53 PM
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Can you send me a link to one of her products. Or please explain how to search for a seller? I haven't used ebay in forever, but I wounldn't mind picking up some discounted items.
Absolutely!

Here is their store:
http://stores.ebay.com/Allergy-Be-Go...=p4634.c0.m322


Keep in mind their prices are substantially lower than retail on M&D.


The best part is the wooden items especially will last for years and years, the quality is fantastic!
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Old 10-01-2012, 04:56 PM
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Thanks I do have one other questions regarding wood toys. How do you clean and sanitize them? I have wood blocks that I spray lightly with bleach/water. Does anyone have advice on how to really get them cleaned? We just had a stomach bug come through and I am still on the fence on if I cleaned them well enough. So they are still sitting up away from the play area.
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Old 10-01-2012, 05:30 PM
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To clean I use vinegar and water. Spritz on (1C water to 1C white vinegar) and wipe dry immediately.
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Old 10-01-2012, 06:58 PM
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Absolutely!

Here is their store:
http://stores.ebay.com/Allergy-Be-Go...=p4634.c0.m322


Keep in mind their prices are substantially lower than retail on M&D.


The best part is the wooden items especially will last for years and years, the quality is fantastic!
acually their prices on m and d stuff is really not cheap at all. I've purchased serval wooden (ok when I saw how much I own of m&d stuff I was so shocked) stuff for way cheaper, and I've even gotten stuff for bogo free.
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:04 PM
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acually their prices on m and d stuff is really not cheap at all. I've purchased serval wooden (ok when I saw how much I own of m&d stuff I was so shocked) stuff for way cheaper, and I've even gotten stuff for bogo free.
Where do you shop!

When looking locally the M&D toys are easily triple the cost as I've found with that seller, if not more. I am currently addicted to building my bins and toy stock lol, if there's somewhere else I could be getting items from and saving even more I'd love to know!
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:34 PM
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Where do you shop!

When looking locally the M&D toys are easily triple the cost as I've found with that seller, if not more. I am currently addicted to building my bins and toy stock lol, if there's somewhere else I could be getting items from and saving even more I'd love to know!
out tjmax and marshalls often have a lot of M&D. I see several of the items I have purchased from both of those places for about 1/2 the price the site you listed.

I would love to find out where others get their M&D toys too. personally they are one of my favorites
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Old 10-01-2012, 09:21 PM
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I've gotten some also from TJ Maxx. Even Toys r Us has buy one get one half off or buy 2 get one free on them at times. Michael's has a limited selection of M&D and you can use your 40% or 50% off coupons on them. Amazon has sales on them at different times too, you just have to check. I've even gotten some at Meijer's (a grocery+ store) on clearance for 75% off after Christmas!
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Old 10-01-2012, 10:13 PM
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I also compared prices, and some of those items are listed on Amazon for cheaper as well and I get free shipping with them. i also look around. Unfortunitely there isn't too many places locally here, I wonder if Ross has m&d items. There's no tjmax here and I haven't checked marshalls. I might have to go SHOPPING tomorrow lol
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Old 10-02-2012, 05:31 AM
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I was anti Montessori for years. I thought it was fluff and that the traditional teaching styles were superior and important to maintain.

Funny what 10+ years will change, huh? Full on Montessori still isn't for me but I now see the benefit of that method. I do appreciate the simpler ways, simpler toys and encouraged independence. Over the last 2-3 years I've implemented some Montessori ways into my daycare and personal philosophy but a balance of Montessori & traditional teaching styles works best for me.

Oh, and for those in Ontario, Canada, Winners usually carries a good variety of M$D toys at decent prices.
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Old 10-02-2012, 07:19 AM
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I've gotten some also from TJ Maxx. Even Toys r Us has buy one get one half off or buy 2 get one free on them at times. Michael's has a limited selection of M&D and you can use your 40% or 50% off coupons on them. Amazon has sales on them at different times too, you just have to check. I've even gotten some at Meijer's (a grocery+ store) on clearance for 75% off after Christmas!
i LOVE MEIJERS and I shop all the time in michigan. I love there 10 for 10 deals.
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Old 10-02-2012, 07:21 AM
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also costco has them too or tru stores. I've even seen them in walmart too. Any in michigan (monroe area) they have a store called CRAFT 2000 and they have cheap stuff too, I love that store so much. And its dirt cheap for any kind of craft stuff you need.
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:57 AM
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I watch sam's club after xmas for M&D toys. Last year, we got the wodd floor block sets that retail for $80 for under $10 a box - we bought 15 boxes and now have a FABULOUS block collection! We also got the set of wooden musical instruments, the wooden food sets that you can "cut", and puzzles for under $10 each. After Xmas is pretty much the only time of year that I buy big stuff like that because I get it at about 80% off retail, or more.
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:59 AM
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I think montessori is great....but I also think other methods are great. I kinda have a mix of reggio, montessori and follow many theorists views of DAP.....Erikson, Vygotsky, Piaget, Maslow.....a little mix of everything that results in a method that is all my own. I think every provider needs to do what works for them and their children..... we are ALL different, and that's okay
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Old 10-02-2012, 11:07 AM
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Is this a set up for a downfall towards the real world and how the "norm" operates? Always being able to do what you want when you want? Real life is not that way

It is really deeper than that. The whole approach teaches children to not only do things on their own but to be motivated to do them.I like this because so many kids have no motivation today. It also helps them be responsible for their choices and actually does the exact opposite of setting them up for failure and sets them up for success since they learn very early on that they ARE capable beings and are capable beings of doing things independently. It also teaches the children to try and not be afraid of trying things. Their own minds/brains do hold the key, they just need to be given the tools and the time to figure it out.

The teacher doesn't read books? How can a child know what a child does not know? I love exploration but there is more to learning then exploration.

It isn't that the teacher doesn't read books to the kids, it is that she doesn't teach from textbooks like seen in traditional classrooms. Books (children's) are a huge part of the Montessori classroom.

As far as learning to read/write, the Montessori approach to reading and literacy is much different than what you think about general about learning literacy skills.

Maria Montessori recognized that children as young as two had an interest in written letters. The "sandpaper letters" (letters cut out of sandpaper that can be traced) were developed to take advantage of this sensitive period. Montessori had an advantage when teaching in Italy; Italian is mostly phonetic. Once the basic phonetic sounds were learned, reading proceeded quite easily.

Montessori also observed that writing usually proceeded reading. When a child writes, all they need to do is turn sounds into letters. When a child reads, they need to pull apart the letters, turn them into phonetic sounds, and put them back together to make a word. It's a more complicated process. Children in Montessori classrooms often write stories with the movable alphabet long before they can read.

Hope that helps explain it a bit better.
Thank you for explaining better. It was helpful.
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Old 10-02-2012, 11:18 AM
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I think montessori is great....but I also think other methods are great. I kinda have a mix of reggio, montessori and follow many theorists views of DAP.....Erikson, Vygotsky, Piaget, Maslow.....a little mix of everything that results in a method that is all my own. I think every provider needs to do what works for them and their children..... we are ALL different, and that's okay
me too!

I thought it was just me on the M&D collections. I was looking at the prices and thinking they were high. I do love the stuff but I never buy any of it unless it is on sale. You do find it all over the place now, not just in specialty stores.
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Old 10-02-2012, 03:05 PM
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I think montessori is great....but I also think other methods are great. I kinda have a mix of reggio, montessori and follow many theorists views of DAP.....Erikson, Vygotsky, Piaget, Maslow.....a little mix of everything that results in a method that is all my own. I think every provider needs to do what works for them and their children..... we are ALL different, and that's okay
I def have more of a reggio inspiried program. It works well with my group.
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Old 10-02-2012, 05:03 PM
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ROSS carries alot of M and D type toys around Christmas time to.

I love, love, love my wooden toys.

I do have one child though that has broken the same wooden toy 3 times. I'm not sure how they are doing it as I find it later after they have played with it. You can only wood glue something together so many times.

I'm very hesitatant to buy more though since I have a child that can break them!
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:38 PM
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I think the problem with montessorri is that its all about problem sloving. Look at all the pictures, go see the places. They stress over and over that they want kids to figure things out. Which is great and I do that here, but I also offer them other things. I also find that all they do is teach knowledgable stuff, like people around the world, they know everything about it.
I like to take components from montessori and mix it with my own stuff, its like a balance. Also, right now, I have all younger children, montessori would not work for them, heck if we can get thru the day with just not fighting over a toy I'm doing well for the day.
When you say you have younger children, what age is that?

Montessori is for all ages, I was able to get trained in infant and toddler (still working on my certification ) but there is so many things to learn about infants and toddlers and so many things that can be done to help them become more independent (feeding,dressing, toileting, etc, communicate, concentrate, hand eye coordination...) there are so many things in our environment that many providers don't realize affect their young ones.

There's a lot of videos on YouTube , here's one

http://m.youtube.com/?reload=7&rdm=m...?v=y0-z7-8loGc
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Old 10-02-2012, 08:48 PM
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If you have infants and toddlers definitely watch that video, I just watched the whole thing and it shows a lot of great things on there
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Old 10-02-2012, 09:34 PM
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When you say you have younger children, what age is that?

Montessori is for all ages, I was able to get trained in infant and toddler (still working on my certification ) but there is so many things to learn about infants and toddlers and so many things that can be done to help them become more independent (feeding,dressing, toileting, etc, communicate, concentrate, hand eye coordination...) there are so many things in our environment that many providers don't realize affect their young ones.

There's a lot of videos on YouTube , here's one

http://m.youtube.com/?reload=7&rdm=m...?v=y0-z7-8loGc
Can I ask where you are getting your cert through?
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Old 10-02-2012, 09:45 PM
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Yay! Got my book from amazon. Something like montrssori the preschool yrs. Its longer title but i am in bed already and too tired to go look at the title. I already cant wait for nap time so i can start reading it. I also went to ross today and purchased some m items. They were priced about the same as amazon only i didnt have to wait for them1 and hubby just got my the alphabet soup cans. Not sure if anyone has them but i really like them. We havent used them much yet but i cant wait to start incorporating them into our program!
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Old 10-03-2012, 03:25 PM
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Originally Posted by daycare View Post
Can I ask where you are getting your cert through?
Through Cmteny

http://www.cmteny.com/
People from all over the country and canada and other countries come to this program for training, most are paid by Montessori centers though, I might have been one of the very few who did it for their group family daycare
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Old 10-04-2012, 11:49 AM
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slpender slpender is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Iowa
Posts: 198
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Originally Posted by Sparrow View Post
http://pinterest.com/scrapbooknook/
There are also a board for sensory bins and different craft ideas. The board re this post is called Montessori Trays
I love your pintrest boards they are great.
Do you leave your trays set out all the time for the children to explore freely?
How often do you change your trays weekly/monthly,

Do you do themes or do you focus on basic skills?

Do you still have play areas such as dramatic play and blocks in your preschool enviroment?
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