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Old 03-29-2017, 10:14 AM
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JackandJill JackandJill is offline
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Default Montessori

Is anyone Montessori or Montessori inspired? Pros and cons of running this type of program?

If you are, where do you begin researching? I know the general idea of Montessori, but would like to learn more to see if it would be a good fit for my child care

I know there is a whole other section in the forum for this, but I thought I would see what kind of responses I get here first!!
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Old 03-29-2017, 11:32 AM
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Yes, I am, although currently I have only infants so there's not so much with the Montessori going on here, other than feedings. For my own child, we used a floor mat instead of a crib, but for obvious reasons I don't do that with the day care.

My starting point would be to read up on Montessori theory and then see it in practice. This book has a 35-page introduction to Montessori theory, followed by practical activities.

I've started "Children of the Universe," which explores Montessori's holistic intention for elementary education (sensory and motor skills are the focus for early education), presenting all fields of study as part of the same narrative of the universe.

See if there's a Montessori preschool in your area that'll let you sit in for a morning to observe.

This blog has a ton of photos and real-life examples.

I think there are kids who are easier to wrangle if you have a strict schedule and lots of busy work, which is NOT the Montessori approach--it's about what's best for the child, not what's easiest for the teacher.

I love the low-stakes, low-pressure mealtimes and pottying. In Montessori, you present the lesson to the child. They get familiar with it before they have the motor control to complete it. So there's not that--I guess you could call it performance anxiety. They build their skills sooner and with less frustration, because you aren't dropping a new lesson in front of them and hovering while you wait for them to get it right.

Honestly? I wish more families were doing Montessori from infancy. For instance, I may never take a co-sleeper again. I wish kids had babyproofed nurseries to explore instead of magazine-worthy nurseries filled with furniture and decor that's for the grownups' enjoyment. I'm over here all day trying to foster independence and motor skills, and when the kids go home they're held constantly and don't get a chance to learn to play--which means, they aren't learning to learn.
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Old 03-29-2017, 12:10 PM
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I like some of the ideas the style offers etc but personally, the types of families that fit best with my style of parenting etc aren't looking for this. Here if you say "Montessori" you get lots of AP parents, mostly secular/nature based religion (I'm a Christian provider), organic foods, non-chemical cleaners, no vax, etc. There is nothing wrong with those, but it's such a different style I feel like it's more often then not, not a good fit (for my program). I'm happy to direct them to the Montessori school that's beautiful and only 5 minutes from here (another reason I wouldn't do it, there is some demand for that style, but not a ton).
But yeah, I'd start by looking in the area at what's already there, talking with parents to see if there's an interest for this etc. And if you can tour, meet with other Montessori providers, that would be a great way to learn more about it!
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Old 03-29-2017, 12:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pestle View Post
Yes, I am, although currently I have only infants so there's not so much with the Montessori going on here, other than feedings. For my own child, we used a floor mat instead of a crib, but for obvious reasons I don't do that with the day care.

My starting point would be to read up on Montessori theory and then see it in practice. This book has a 35-page introduction to Montessori theory, followed by practical activities.

I've started "Children of the Universe," which explores Montessori's holistic intention for elementary education (sensory and motor skills are the focus for early education), presenting all fields of study as part of the same narrative of the universe.

See if there's a Montessori preschool in your area that'll let you sit in for a morning to observe.

This blog has a ton of photos and real-life examples.

I think there are kids who are easier to wrangle if you have a strict schedule and lots of busy work, which is NOT the Montessori approach--it's about what's best for the child, not what's easiest for the teacher.

I love the low-stakes, low-pressure mealtimes and pottying. In Montessori, you present the lesson to the child. They get familiar with it before they have the motor control to complete it. So there's not that--I guess you could call it performance anxiety. They build their skills sooner and with less frustration, because you aren't dropping a new lesson in front of them and hovering while you wait for them to get it right.

Honestly? I wish more families were doing Montessori from infancy. For instance, I may never take a co-sleeper again. I wish kids had babyproofed nurseries to explore instead of magazine-worthy nurseries filled with furniture and decor that's for the grownups' enjoyment. I'm over here all day trying to foster independence and motor skills, and when the kids go home they're held constantly and don't get a chance to learn to play--which means, they aren't learning to learn.
I run a 1-18 months childcare home and Montessori inspired... I invested in a lot of Waldorf & Montessori style infant & toddler toys years ago and still use them, though the play silks are finally needing to be replaced lol. I do have low shelving & limited stuff out also. No TV, we listen to all types of music, use floor beds (toddler mattresses) and when they get a little older I do have all of them eating at a table & learning to use small sized silverware & glasses. I have a book shelf of books that are Art based... Masterpiece board books & the companion touch series are my favorites. I found the entire set on Amazon (bought with a Christmas bonus I received from a family 6 years ago lol). My 15 month old dcb even knows to take his shoes off at the door & take his " momma milk" bags into the kitchen to be put away lol
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Old 03-29-2017, 12:26 PM
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I love that Montessori allows room for each child to develop at his or her own pace. I like the thoughtful detail places on the classroom (low shelves, no clutter, well planned). I appreciate their approach to self-care giving children the tools and teaching but not pressuring (i.e. potty learning, washing hands, etc.) I love the respect they give children and it reminds me of my RIE parenting classes.

I do not like that it seems to attract parents who are more academic leaning in my area nor that anyone can use Montessori in the name of their program as it gives parents who tour them an incorrect impression of what Montessori looks like in action.

I would advise you get trained in Montessori and become AMI certified if it's something you can see yourself doing long term. In the meantime there are lots of blogs and books to guide.....

I am not Montessori but I give this book to most new parents in my personal life: https://www.amazon.com/How-Raise-Ama...ntessori+books

It is not the most in-depth book however it gives parents (and providers) the basics to get children started on the right track.
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Old 03-29-2017, 12:41 PM
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Thanks, ladies! I have research a few books, and will definitely be taking a look at all your suggestions.
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Old 03-29-2017, 01:55 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by finsup View Post
I like some of the ideas the style offers etc but personally, the types of families that fit best with my style of parenting etc aren't looking for this. Here if you say "Montessori" you get lots of AP parents, mostly secular/nature based religion (I'm a Christian provider), organic foods, non-chemical cleaners, no vax, etc.
So frustrating--Montessori was deeply religious and there's a Montessori catechesis created by one of her colleagues. She was also pro-science and, at least the way we and our daughter's school practice it, Montessori doesn't align with AP at all in terms of feeding, toileting, sleeping, and etc. I think people just see the lesson materials and assume that's all there is to it.
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Old 03-29-2017, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Pestle View Post
So frustrating--Montessori was deeply religious and there's a Montessori catechesis created by one of her colleagues. She was also pro-science and, at least the way we and our daughter's school practice it, Montessori doesn't align with AP at all in terms of feeding, toileting, sleeping, and etc. I think people just see the lesson materials and assume that's all there is to it.
That is because 98% of AP parents don't truly understand what AP is. Most simply think "Don't let Billy cry" and 'wear' him until he gets on the bus and heads of to Kindy.

I am a Montessori and Reggio "inspired" program.

I love many of their approaches to learning and think that given the world we live in today (in terms of coping skills and self-help skills) I think many of the concepts are so beneficial for kids.

Her philosophy on education is phenomenal!!

“The environment must be rich in motives which lend interest to activity and invite the child to conduct his own experiences.”

“The things he sees are not just remembered; they form a part of his soul.”

“Children are human beings to whom respect is due, superior to us by reason of their innocence and of the greater possibilities of their future.”

“When dealing with children there is greater need for observing than of probing”

“It is true that we cannot make a genius. We can only give to teach child the chance to fulfil his potential possibilities.”

“Little children, from the moment they are weaned, are making their way toward independence.”

“Never help a child with a task at which he feels he can succeed.”

“The child is both a hope and a promise for mankind.”

“Education is a natural process carried out by the child and is not acquired by listening to words but by experiences in the environment.”

“The first essential for the child’s development is concentration. The child who concentrates is immensely happy.”

“Respect all the reasonable forms of activity in which the child engages and try to understand them.”

“Plainly, the environment must be a living one, directed by a higher intelligence, arranged by an adult who is prepared for his mission.”
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Old 03-29-2017, 05:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pestle View Post
So frustrating--Montessori was deeply religious and there's a Montessori catechesis created by one of her colleagues. She was also pro-science and, at least the way we and our daughter's school practice it, Montessori doesn't align with AP at all in terms of feeding, toileting, sleeping, and etc. I think people just see the lesson materials and assume that's all there is to it.
That is really interesting! I didnt know enough about it to realize AP doesn't actually align with it. That has got to be hard for the school because if I've seen it, I'm sure they have. Thank you for posting, not knowing a ton about it and just seeing what groups around here are interested in it, I wouldn't have realized the AP style doesn't line up with the program.
But then again all the AP moms here do seem to be exactly what black cat said.
But anyways, interest sparked, maybe there's more to this then I realized time for research!
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Old 03-29-2017, 06:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
98% of AP parents don't truly understand what AP is. Most simply think "Don't let Billy cry" and 'wear' him until he gets on the bus and heads of to Kindy.[/i]
Oy vey! I've only had one family so far who said they were AP, but half the other families have kids who are anxiety-ridden from being petted all the time at home. It's a loop: The parents soothe the kids because otherwise the parents will never get any peace, but then the kids are unable to stay soothed because they believe they need to be in full contact with their parents at all times.

We're one of only a few middle-income families at the school and I'm also one of the only parents who's native to the region. Montessori was developed for the working-class poor, but it didn't take off in the US and so it's not available to the poor and the poor are mostly unaware of it. (We're in a region with crushing poverty and also a booming tech and startup industry.) So a lot of the families who immigrate to the US know about Montessori and seek it out. And a lot of the families are older--the type to work for years, then get married, then work for more years, then have kids as they approach middle age. I don't think these are the AP-type families.
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