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Old 04-02-2010, 10:27 AM
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Default New to Daycare - Always in the Swing

My son is 4 months old and just started daycare 4 days ago. Prior to daycare his grandfather was watching him at home. The daycare has a webcam and it seems like every time I log in to see what he's up to he's in the swing sleeping. I know they have other children to look after but I'm wondering if he's swinging/sleeping too much. I've never had a problem putting him to bed at night, but ever since he's started daycare he is much harder to put to bed. Any ideas? Suggestions?
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Old 04-02-2010, 11:22 AM
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I don't know about where you are, but here it isn't allowed to have a child sleep in a swing....you may want to check the licensing rules on that in your area.

As for how much is too much...how often are you checking? It may be that he is sleeping more at daycare and less at home as part of his transition.

I think what I would do is try to make an effort to monitor every hour or so for the next week, perhaps keep a journal of the time/date/activity. It will probably become very clear how your baby is spending his days and if he is sleeping less and less at daycare as he becomes more acclimated.
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Old 04-02-2010, 11:51 AM
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Thanks for the advice...i'll definitely check on that. I figured it was all a part of him adjusting, but I wanted to be sure. I'll make sure to monitor the webcam every hour to see whats happening. I just thought they would do more with him developmentally. NewMommyC

Last edited by Michael; 04-02-2010 at 12:04 PM.
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Old 04-02-2010, 12:02 PM
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If he's sleeping, he should be in a bed. Part of not sleeping as well at home could also be that he's getting used to the swinging motion to help him sleep. I agree with the suggestions Jen made and would follow through with those, especially monitering every hour at least.
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Old 04-02-2010, 04:06 PM
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Sleeping could be his transistion, yes. Also, children's growth happens primarily while asleep, and babies fastest growth is in the first year of life. They will sleep, and should sleep ALOT during this time. The little bit they are awake, however, they should be interacted with, held, talked to etc. I agree with Momofsix, though, unless there is some acid reflux issue..he needs to be in his bed / crib / pack n' play while sleeping.
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Old 04-04-2010, 02:48 PM
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Thanks for the advice...i'll definitely check on that. I figured it was all a part of him adjusting, but I wanted to be sure. I'll make sure to monitor the webcam every hour to see whats happening. I just thought they would do more with him developmentally. NewMommyC
He's four months old....at that age, the average kid sleeps, wakes up to eat, goes back to sleep, wakes up to get his shorts changed, sleeps some more....I'm starting to get jealous here!

Honestly, under one year, kids are like old dogs, they sleep, eat and poop and not much else.
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Old 04-04-2010, 03:31 PM
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Here in TX same thing: a baby can not be in a swing (or any other confinement other than a crib) for more than 30 mins at a time. They can be in a crib only when sleeping. If after being awake for more than 30 mins, the child must be able to get up and on to other things

I agree with the other posters. Log on different times and note each time. If you can't do it on a routine basis maybe ask Grandpa or someone you can trust to look at the cam for you.
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Old 04-05-2010, 12:58 PM
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He's four months old....at that age, the average kid sleeps, wakes up to eat, goes back to sleep, wakes up to get his shorts changed, sleeps some more....I'm starting to get jealous here!

Honestly, under one year, kids are like old dogs, they sleep, eat and poop and not much else.
That's what all mine did too! It's totally normal. I miss their baby days , I got waaaaay more done around the house during their sleep time. Now that they are older, its much more difficult...
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Old 04-05-2010, 01:03 PM
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This is totally normal. As others said, eat and sleep. That is most of their day. If he is sleeping and content, I would think the daycare is doing a good job. And there is the saying.....never wake a sleeping baby.

This is one reason that I would never allow cameras in my daycare, or in a center if I owned one. No way I am going to be second guessed 11 hours a day.
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Old 04-05-2010, 03:26 PM
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Sure, babies that age should be sleeping alot, but NO, not in a swing. As the parent, I'd be pissed if my baby was always sleeping in a swing. NOT HEALTHY at all.
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Old 04-05-2010, 06:50 PM
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Yeah, he should not be sleeping in a swing. In MI we are told if a child falls asleep in the swing/bouncy/etc we are to move them to a crib.
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Old 04-05-2010, 09:23 PM
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When was the last time you heard of baby dying of SIDS in a swing. I feel safer having babies taking a nap in a swing where I can see them versus in a crib in a room away from me. If I don't have the baby in a swing then I usually have them sleep in their car seat until they are old enough to get out of the carseat on their own (I don't buckle them in when sleeping and leave the seat on the floor). When they are old enough to get out on their own, they are big enough to pick up their headed and roll over and thus the risk of SIDS is significantly decrease.
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Old 04-05-2010, 10:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Crystal View Post
Sure, babies that age should be sleeping alot, but NO, not in a swing. As the parent, I'd be pissed if my baby was always sleeping in a swing. NOT HEALTHY at all.
You say it's unhealthy to sleep in a swing....what exact health risks does this pose?

Our child swing is kinda recliner-like, very comfortable napping position, IMHO.
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Old 04-06-2010, 03:41 AM
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You say it's unhealthy to sleep in a swing....what exact health risks does this pose?

Our child swing is kinda recliner-like, very comfortable napping position, IMHO.
No babies should not sleep in a swing. Small babies don't have the strength to hold their heads straight, even when sitting in a reclined position, making it easy for their airways to be blocked. The risk of baby's head falling forward in a way that would affect breathing is one reason why it's important to be sure that the baby is never left unattended in a swing.
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Old 04-06-2010, 04:10 AM
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I could understand this with the swings of years ago where the infant basically sat up, but the swings of today are very much a reclining swing, a least mine is, which makes a big difference. Infants also sleep much better in a reclining position vs laying down. Personally, I feel we all need to do whatever works the best for each individual infant. Not every infant is the same, sleeps the same, etc.
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Old 04-06-2010, 06:48 AM
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I could understand this with the swings of years ago where the infant basically sat up, but the swings of today are very much a reclining swing, a least mine is, which makes a big difference. Infants also sleep much better in a reclining position vs laying down. Personally, I feel we all need to do whatever works the best for each individual infant. Not every infant is the same, sleeps the same, etc.
I agree with mac60. The swing that I have holds the baby at about the same angle as if you were holding the sleeping baby in your arms. One of my parents specifically said to put her baby in the swing for a nap Unless licensing prohibits it in your area, I see nothing wrong with letting a baby fall asleep in the right kind of swing.
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Old 04-06-2010, 06:48 AM
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Default Fyi

http://pediatrics.about.com/od/weekl...baby_sleep.htm
Info about sleeping in swings/carseats and cranium deformities and SIDS]
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Old 04-06-2010, 07:24 AM
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Originally Posted by misol View Post
I agree with mac60. The swing that I have holds the baby at about the same angle as if you were holding the sleeping baby in your arms. One of my parents specifically said to put her baby in the swing for a nap Unless licensing prohibits it in your area, I see nothing wrong with letting a baby fall asleep in the right kind of swing.
Parents can't give you permission to do the wrong thing. They don't get to decide for you to do something that isn't safe. It doesn't matter that they are the parents. They can decide what THEY do but they can't decide what you do if what they decide is wrong.

Babies should sleep FLAT out on their backs. They need gravity to keep their head from jutting forward and cutting off their wind pipes. The only way they can do that is to have their whole bodies laying FLAT. If the angle of their head is above their butts it's not safe.

The ONLY exception would be a medical exception. The child would have to have a note from the Dr. ORDERING them to sleep at an angle or upright position.

For one of the above posters: The difference between cradling a child in your ARMS to the same angle as them sitting in a seat is that you are HOLDING the child the entire time. That way YOU balance the position of their heads in relation to their necks. A swing can't do that. It's an apples and oranges comparison.
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Old 04-06-2010, 07:42 AM
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This is probably one of those debates that will never be solved. Someone is always going to disagree. And a parent does have and should have the right to say how their baby can and can't sleep, or has the government taken that right of parenting away too.
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Old 04-06-2010, 07:58 AM
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This is probably one of those debates that will never be solved. Someone is always going to disagree. And a parent does have and should have the right to say how their baby can and can't sleep, or has the government taken that right of parenting away too.
Yes, in daycare the parent does loose the right to decide how the baby can and and cannot sleep. Not following the regs regarding this issue has HUGE legal ramification if, God forbid, something terrible should happen.

The debate may never be solved, but the law has been made so there really isn't a debate to be had in this instance.
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Old 04-06-2010, 08:12 AM
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If you are licensed in the state of MI and the state inspector walks in you are in violation of the following statue. Doesn't matter to the state what your rationale is for letting a child sleep in a swing. Doesn't have to do with position it has to do with softness of surface. If a child is in your arms 'hopefully' said child is being monitored by caregiver, not so in swing.


R 400.1916 (10-11) Bedding and sleeping equipment.
(10) Infant car seats, infant seats, infant swings, bassinets, highchairs,
waterbeds, adult beds, soft mattresses, sofas, beanbags,
or other soft surfaces are not approved sleeping equipment for
children 24 months of age or younger.
(11) Children 24 months or younger who fall asleep in a space that
is not approved for sleeping shall be moved to approved sleeping
equipment appropriate for their size and age.
Rationale Assures for the safety and well-being of children.
Technical
Assistance
If there is a health issue or special need that requires a child sleep in an
elevated position, documentation from the child's health provider is
required prior to allowing a child to sleep in anything other than a crib
or porta-crib. The documentation must include specific sleeping instructions
and time frames for how long the child needs to sleep in this manner
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Old 04-06-2010, 08:51 AM
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Yes, in daycare the parent does loose the right to decide how the baby can and and cannot sleep. Not following the regs regarding this issue has HUGE legal ramification if, God forbid, something terrible should happen.

The debate may never be solved, but the law has been made so there really isn't a debate to be had in this instance.
As a parent, it is my right to speak on behalf of my child, or did somewhere the gov't take that away too.

Every child is different in some way, in their sleeping patterns, eating patterns, their disposition, simply every child is different in some way. I have had some parents tell me their child sleeps so much better in a swing or bouncer seat in a reclining position, and that is what they do at home, whether it is because they are congested a lot, or whatever the reason may be. I just feel that a parent should have that right to make those kind of decisions for their own child, and if a parent tells me to let their child sleep in a swing, it is their right to ask me the provider to care for their child as they see fit.

As for the original question of the child appearing to be sleeping in the swing everytime the parent logged on to see in the daycare. I can seriously see that this could "seem like a problem", when it truly isn't. As if the provider attempted to take the child out of the swing and put in crib, the child will more than likely wake up, so the provider then used the swing to get the child to calm down, the child nods off, the provider tries to take them out again, just a potential vicious cycle. If your child appears happy, content and well cared for at the end of the day, is that not the goal of both parent and provider, and it should be of the gov't too.
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Last edited by mac60; 04-06-2010 at 09:27 AM.
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Old 04-06-2010, 10:23 AM
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As a parent, it is my right to speak on behalf of my child, or did somewhere the gov't take that away too.

Every child is different in some way, in their sleeping patterns, eating patterns, their disposition, simply every child is different in some way. I have had some parents tell me their child sleeps so much better in a swing or bouncer seat in a reclining position, and that is what they do at home, whether it is because they are congested a lot, or whatever the reason may be. I just feel that a parent should have that right to make those kind of decisions for their own child, and if a parent tells me to let their child sleep in a swing, it is their right to ask me the provider to care for their child as they see fit.
Are you on the food program? Do you follow the rules? I don't personally agree with many of the requirements of the program but as I am utilizing that program I do have to abide by them.

The same goes for being a licensed provider. If you are licensed, then you have to follow the guidelines of that license. The water has be at a certain temperature, you need have the proper paperwork on file, and that includes sleeping arrangements as well.

Is the government taking away your rights or the rights of the parent? Well, yes, but those are the laws and you really, really want to follow them. Seriously, you could land in actual JAIL were you to be found negligent. Parents may tell you one thing, but if their child dies of SIDS in your care, they will be looking for someone to blame and it will be you.
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Old 04-06-2010, 10:51 AM
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Never said I didn't follow the rules, just that as a parent I should be able to say what is ok or not for my child. And honesly, can anyway say that "yes, every got't rule and regulation is the "right way"? I doubt it.
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Old 04-06-2010, 11:01 AM
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This is probably one of those debates that will never be solved. Someone is always going to disagree. And a parent does have and should have the right to say how their baby can and can't sleep, or has the government taken that right of parenting away too.
Mac,

I've lurked on this board for quite a while and just recently started posting. Over the many years of lurking I have found some posters that I really enjoy reading. You are at the top of my fave list I agree with you on almost everything. I don't agree with you on this one.

Here's the deal that many providers don't get: Parents don't have the right to get someone else to do something that's not best practice or safe. There are MANY situations where parents want something for a child but are not physically with the child to be the ONE person who takes responsibility for the decision. As soon as the responsibility becomes SHARED or soley on someone else the parents "rights" diminish greatly. That's because it's not just them that will pay.

In this situation... for example.. even if you had the parents provide "permission" for sleeping in a swing and something happened to the baby... then the PARENTS would most likely not be able to come after you for the death of their baby. The parents, however, can not decide what society or the goverment will do with you for this mistake. The parents can't get the Department of Human Services to not hold you accountable. The parents can't get the child's insurer to not come after you should the child not die but have life altering medical conditions because of a suffocation. The insurer won't give a flip what the parents told you to do. They will want the money for the child's care and they will want that from YOU.

You see there are other entities to consider. The parents are just ONE part of the package of who is affected by something happening to a child. Society, the government, and ANY business that has a financial stake in the child CAN and will make you accountable for the actions YOU take with the child.

See?

That's why I say that parents can't give permission for a provider to do the wrong thing. I can't TELL you how many times I have had parents tell me to do something that I simply can not do. One example was a few years back I had a Mom who wanted her newly turned SIX month old baby switched from formula to whole milk. She got free WIC but she wanted to keep the WIC for her at her house and have me just use milk. The baby was taking enough formula that what WIC gave didn't cover all of it. The Mom wanted ME to switch her to milk so she didn't have to provide formula.

I refused and educated her as to why babies under the age of one can't have whole milk (pernicious anemia, digestion etc.). The Mom insisted that SHE was the Mom and that SHE got to decide. I told her to get me a Doctors note saying that I could give milk. She actually took the kid to the Doc and of course.. the Doc refused to give the note for the same reasons I gave her.

She was furious and did a lot of stomping around because she believed what you believe.... that if she is the parents she should be able to decide. That was fine for when SHE was giving the milk but she couldn't ask ME or the Doc to be a part of doing something that research clearly indicates is not safe for a baby.

Same deal with the swing. It's just not safe to leave babies unattended in a swing sleeping. Their heads are very heavy and gravity can pull that head down. Their little necks and shoulders are not strong enough to RIGHT their head back in position. Having a heavy head jutted forward over the neck can cause the childs wind pipe to collapse and kill the child or cause a lack of oxygen that can permanently damage their brains. It's just not safe. There is a reason the State's one by one are putting it in their regs. It's simple laws of physics that tell you not to allow something heavy (head) over something weak (baby neck) and expect gravity to not take over and cause the big thing to crush the little.

See?

I understand your premise... but now maybe you can see a little different pov. It's a GREAT conversation to have... and I have had it over the years with many an experienced provider like you. Even with a lot of experience and the best interest of the kids.. you still can grow and change your opinions. I hope you do on this one.

Nan
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Old 04-06-2010, 01:47 PM
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I don't think that ONE sleeping position is best for ALL babies. As was said in an earlier post, every child is different in some way. Since the regs in my state (VA) do not specifically prohibit sleeping in swings, my daycare baby sleeps in a swing at the mother's request. Most of the current literature regarding sleeping positions seems to be more about SIDS than about blocked airways. I just checked and there is also nothing in our regs that state that you MUST put sleeping infants on their backs either. I have this written in my own policies, but it is not in our minimum standards. I always put daycare infants to sleep on their backs but when my own two children were infants I regularly put them to sleep on their stomachs (or in a swing). It was their preferred method of sleeping so that's how I let them sleep. That was how my mother let me sleep, and that was how my grandmother let her sleep. Whatever works best for the individual baby and their family.
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Old 04-06-2010, 05:09 PM
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I don't think that ONE sleeping position is best for ALL babies. As was said in an earlier post, every child is different in some way. Since the regs in my state (VA) do not specifically prohibit sleeping in swings, my daycare baby sleeps in a swing at the mother's request. Most of the current literature regarding sleeping positions seems to be more about SIDS than about blocked airways. I just checked and there is also nothing in our regs that state that you MUST put sleeping infants on their backs either. I have this written in my own policies, but it is not in our minimum standards. I always put daycare infants to sleep on their backs but when my own two children were infants I regularly put them to sleep on their stomachs (or in a swing). It was their preferred method of sleeping so that's how I let them sleep. That was how my mother let me sleep, and that was how my grandmother let her sleep. Whatever works best for the individual baby and their family.
The risk is your risk to take. As the sole provider of care for the child at that time the decision to allow a "preferred method of sleeping" is something only you can make absent any regulations telling you otherwise.

I don't do what the children want. I do what they need. I also have to consider my livlihood and the future of my family. I wouldn't knowingly do something that would put a child at risk especially when there is a very simple viable option that is endorsed by solid research and the American Academy of Pediatrics. That option is to put them to bed on their backs on a firm bottom without ANYTHING in the bed with them.

I put kids to bed completely wide awake every single day. Day after day after day..... month after month.. year after year. They go to sleep and sleep like little lambs. I can't understand the NEED for swings to lull babies to sleep. It takes such a small amount of time to get them used to motionless, wide awake.. put themselves to sleep sleep.

I've had a number of babies who are "swing and motion" addicted when they come to me but a good solid routine with a ton of exercise and activity quickly changes their need to be put to sleep. Tucker them out... fill their bellies before nap... give em time to poop... and then put them to bed wide awake in a darkened room. Magic formula that works thru the years.

Nan
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Old 04-06-2010, 07:52 PM
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No babies should not sleep in a swing. Small babies don't have the strength to hold their heads straight, even when sitting in a reclined position, making it easy for their airways to be blocked. The risk of baby's head falling forward in a way that would affect breathing is one reason why it's important to be sure that the baby is never left unattended in a swing.
That makes sense. Thanks.

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And a parent does have and should have the right to say how their baby can and can't sleep, or has the government taken that right of parenting away too.
Regulations like this are in place for two reasons-to protect you the provider (criminal and civilly), and to protect the child....both from people who don't know any better.

Stop and think about this-just because someone squeezes out a kid, does that make them an expert on anatomy, development of anatomy, and biology?

SIDS has been studied by people with WAY more education, time, and expertise in these fields than you, I and the parents combined. They have determined, through years of study, data, and research that certain things increase the risk factors.

If you feel it's OK to ignore the law and put your freedom (ever done time for negligent manslaughter?) and life's savings on the line, feel free to do so.

Were it me, if a parent asked me to go against the law of the land for their child, I'd require a doctors written note to back it up and a signed release by the parent.

It's about limiting liability.
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Old 04-07-2010, 04:09 AM
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That makes sense. Thanks.



Regulations like this are in place for two reasons-to protect you the provider (criminal and civilly), and to protect the child....both from people who don't know any better.

Stop and think about this-just because someone squeezes out a kid, does that make them an expert on anatomy, development of anatomy, and biology?

SIDS has been studied by people with WAY more education, time, and expertise in these fields than you, I and the parents combined. They have determined, through years of study, data, and research that certain things increase the risk factors.

If you feel it's OK to ignore the law and put your freedom (ever done time for negligent manslaughter?) and life's savings on the line, feel free to do so.

Were it me, if a parent asked me to go against the law of the land for their child, I'd require a doctors written note to back it up and a signed release by the parent.

It's about limiting liability.

Who said anything about ignoring the law, doing time for negligent manslaughter.........I only said that the government gets into our business way too much.
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Old 04-07-2010, 07:50 AM
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Nanny...thank you for making my argument me....you said it all very well, and I agree with you 100%.
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Old 04-07-2010, 11:41 AM
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Originally Posted by nannyde View Post
The risk is your risk to take. As the sole provider of care for the child at that time the decision to allow a "preferred method of sleeping" is something only you can make absent any regulations telling you otherwise.

I don't do what the children want. I do what they need. I also have to consider my livlihood and the future of my family. I wouldn't knowingly do something that would put a child at risk especially when there is a very simple viable option that is endorsed by solid research and the American Academy of Pediatrics. That option is to put them to bed on their backs on a firm bottom without ANYTHING in the bed with them.

I put kids to bed completely wide awake every single day. Day after day after day..... month after month.. year after year. They go to sleep and sleep like little lambs. I can't understand the NEED for swings to lull babies to sleep. It takes such a small amount of time to get them used to motionless, wide awake.. put themselves to sleep sleep.

I've had a number of babies who are "swing and motion" addicted when they come to me but a good solid routine with a ton of exercise and activity quickly changes their need to be put to sleep. Tucker them out... fill their bellies before nap... give em time to poop... and then put them to bed wide awake in a darkened room. Magic formula that works thru the years.

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Point taken.
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Old 04-07-2010, 04:28 PM
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This hits a little too close to home...

http://www.woodtv.com/dpp/news/local...ging-seat-dies
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Old 04-07-2010, 05:13 PM
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Very sad This SHOULD be a wake up call.....I wonder if anyone will heed it.
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Old 04-07-2010, 05:21 PM
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Originally Posted by emosks View Post
This hits a little too close to home...

http://www.woodtv.com/dpp/news/local...ging-seat-dies
The other concern about sleeping in a seat is a baby's head leaning over to the side of the seat and getting their face nestled into the sides of the seat.

It's just not safe to let them sleep in a seat... swing seat or car seat. They should be laying flat on their backs to allow gravity to do it's job and keep the head supported as much as possible.

Even if the seat is completely reclined as far as it will go, it's not safe. You are still allowing them facial access to the sides of the seat. Also, some babies are strong enough to jut their heads forward but not strong enough to right it back into position.

The other thing to think about is the motion of the swing alone could cause the head to jut forward or to the side. The bigger the arch of the swing or the faster you set the setting on the swing the more you are at risk for the infant head to jut to the side or forward.

There are some situations where a doc may write a note to allow a baby to sit at an angle. Severe cases of reflux is one of them. Just remember that even WITH a note from a doc it doesn't give permission for the child to sleep unattended at an angle in a seat. You should always assume that even with directions to allow a child to sleep in a seat that you should supervise them AT ALL TIMES they are in a seat.

Nan
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Old 04-07-2010, 05:37 PM
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Nan, I completely agree...I had a child with reflux and his parents provided me with a medically approved "wedge" which kept his body somewhat upright in his crib. If a child has a medical issue or a bad cold there are other things that can be done without resorting to a swing or a car seat.
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Old 04-08-2010, 12:15 AM
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Originally Posted by mac60 View Post
Who said anything about ignoring the law, doing time for negligent manslaughter.........I only said that the government gets into our business way too much.
You did say (or at least until you decided to edit your posts) that a DC provider should be able to leave the child sleeping in the swing.

That would be ignoring the law, which could very well open yourself up to manslaughter charges if a child were to die in your care while sleeping in the swing like that linked story.
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Old 02-03-2017, 03:05 PM
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I stumbled across this form while looking for reviews or something on infants swings for my infant room. I am a professional infant teacher for six years, and I have four children of my own. There are a lot of good points in all of these comments - and I have a few notes of my own.

#1 infants sleep better in swings because they were just in a cramped space for a few months (mom), their knees in the belly all curled up. Yes, part of it is the motion, part of it is their legs being held up vs flat on a crib mattress.

#2 Does the infant get gassy and / or spit up a lot throughout the day? this may be due to being in a swing! When the swing is moving back and forth (typically when it is swinging back and fourth vs side to side) the infant may take big gulps of air, when the air rushes across their face which will cause an upset tummy. If you have an infant that needs to sit up for XX amount of time after eating, a swing is a good option, but do not start the swing. Have you ever gone on a roller coaster after eating a five course meal, I would not suggest it! How do you think an infant feels after eating and being bounced or swung?

#3 Every state has different rules as to where an infant can and cannot sleep, and for how long. There are a lot of good points listed above, the infant can turn their head into the side, which if they spit up they could in-hail the spit up.

#4 Yes, parents have the say of what they do at home, but every state has rules that need to be followed, I looked up a few of the states I've seen and VA - I was appalled by the rules for a sleeping infant, they almost do not exist! (I like the spitting out the kid comment - too true!)

Infants spend enough time in a swing, carrier, bouncers, bumbo seats, sit and plays, etc. not only does an infant need time on the floor to gain muscle strength for holding their head up, sitting up, crawling, etc. but they also need interaction with peers for social / emotional development and interactions with their teachers, to learn how to show proper emotions. Remember, you only know what a parent tells you. You do not know what the home life is truly like for these little ones, your smiling face and pleasant voice may be the only one they hear and see in a day, and if they are in a 'CONTAINER' for the majority of their day then they are not getting the attention they deserve are they??

Here is a link to the National Instatute of Child Health and Human Development, which states that infants need tummy time and a few reasons why:
https://www.nichd.nih.gov/sts/about/...tummytime.aspx

#5 How much do you pay or does your center charge for the care of an infant for full time 40 hours a week, if your center is hourly just multiply the hourly amount by 40, I know it is case by case, typical cost around here is $240.00 a week so that is $960.00 a month, A MONTH! Just for their infant to sit in a swing for the majority of the day, seriously?! How often are they changed, fed and interacted with? If an infant is in a swing for the majority of the day, what are these parents paying for?! They could just as easy turn on the swing, go to work and have someone check on their child every hour or so if being in a swing all day long was what they wanted!

Now, if a parent did that what would happen to them if someone found out??? Child services would be called, they could loose their child and end up in jail. So, what is the difference between a parent leaving a child home alone in a swing and having the neighbor look in on them every so often and a child care provider leaving them in a swing all day?? A child care provider receives a pay check for it and the parents do not go to jail.

Now, someone mentioned if the child falls asleep in the swing and is moved, wakes up, put back into the swing, falls asleep, moving to crib attempted again, wakes up, repeat.

WHY THE HECK WOULD YOU PUT THE CHILD BACK INTO THE SWING?! They are tired! Check their diaper, see if they need to be fed if not, why not ROCK THEM YOURSELF!? so that once they are asleep, you can place them in bed. Did they wake up? Yes? then try again! Practice makes perfect, and once they are tired enough they will sleep in their crib. They will not sleep in their crib if they are hungry, being bunched up in a swing or bouncer reduces hunger pains because of their knees being in their stomach. (try it, it is true) They will not sleep if they are uncomfortable, being on their back when they are not used to it AND having a wet diaper is a recipe for no sleep.

I know, from a lot of personal experience that the first week, or two, or three are going to SUCK. there is no way to sugar coat it. you are training this child to sleep in their crib. Communicate with parents, if the infant is less then six months old (or cannot roll over) and is used to sleeping in a swing and will NOT sleep in their crib at day care, try a sleep sack, often it is because they are cold, others it is because they are used to their arms being snugged tight to them. There are swaddle sleep sacks for younger infants, however, if they are young (do not roll over) and need to be swaddled, you can simply keep their arms out of the sleeves (inside the sleep sack) and that typically does the trick.

It is all about working smarter, not harder! If you have eight infants, and say two swings and two bouncer seats, that is still only four places for them to sleep. And have you ever seen a mobile infant try to launch a non-mobile sleeping infant out of a bouncer seat?? (mobile infant grabs top of bouncer by the head of the smaller infant and attempts to stand up or simply pulls down and then falls, sits or just lets go - the bouncer 'bounces' 4 - 8 inches) This COULD give the infant whiplash OR shaken baby if you have an older toddler and you cannot get there fast enough - say you are changing a poop blow out and have poop every where.

What about the older infants that are constantly trying to catch the swing, or crawl under it and keep getting their heads whacked by the seat of the swing. "Maybe they will learn not to do that then" is NOT an acceptable answer! Shut the swing off and they are less likely to go to it, I did not say they would stop, I said, "less likely" you have to TEACH them to stay away from it, by moving them, over and over again, telling them "that is not a choice for you" or "let's make better choices over here by the blocks" TEACH THEM TEACHERS.

Lastly, to the mom worried about her infant always being in the swing, talk to the teachers, if it does not change talk to the director, if it does not change they are required to have their licensing specialist information posted (if not call the department of health and human services, they will point you in the right direction) and make a complaint. IF it is getting to this point I would consider looking else were for care, because you are not paying that center your hard earned dollars for your infant to live out their days in a swing. Make it clear what you expect and make sure it is followed. If you need to check the web cam every 15 minutes for a minute or two, communicate this need with your employer and why, I highly doubt they would have a problem with it - if they do, perhaps dad, grandparents, aunts or uncles would help you check the web cam and write down where they saw your child when they checked.

Regardless what you decide, do not EVER give up what you want for your child because you are afraid to speak up or because they tell you know / are not doing it. PUSH for it to be done, because you are the parent! If they tell you they cannot do something because it is against licensing rules, ask them to see it, or go online and search licensed child care standard for your state. You do not have to read the entire thing, download as a PDF and click the magnifying glass icon, then type in what you are looking for, you may need to try a few different key words, but you will find it, it just might not be what you want to read. If it is a center rule - did you get a parent hand book?? If not, request one. a center with cameras is going to have one, but it is probably generic.

If needed, get a doctors note, if your child's provider agrees it needs to be done, a licensing specialist will not argue with it - remember to keep a copy of the note for yourself - just in case......

Okay, I think I will stop here, as I could continue for hours. I am very passionate for both my profession and my role as a mother. To everyone that reads this, as your child grows remember to spend time with them, after they are walking and talking good it is easy to become busy with life and before you know it they are grown and moving out. Give them an extra kiss at night, an extra hug each morning. Read them the story they ask for, when it is after bed time and you are exhausted, because you are showing your child that even though you are bone tired from a stressful day at work that they come first.

On the same note, do not be afraid to say no, to let them know when things are financially difficult, do not shelter them from reality. I am not saying throw them to the wolves, I am saying this because a child that feels they are second place begins to resent their parents and look for love in the wrong places. A child that does not understand that money does not grow on trees, is far less likely to understand they need to save their money in order to get what they want. A child that never hears no, becomes that spoil child screaming in the grocery store. Teach them to love, to save / budget, to know that they can have what they want, but it may take a while to get it. Chores around the house is a good way to earn what they want. A chore chart with regular daily, simple tasks is a great way to teach a good work ethic.

Good luck, parents, teachers, future parents, grand parents and guardians. Because your life involves children, your life just became (or is) awesome. You are shaping the next generation, shape them well!
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  #38  
Old 02-03-2017, 09:33 PM
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The original post is from 7 years ago. The child is most likely in elementary school these days.
You bring up some good points. Welcome to the forum.
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Old 02-04-2017, 05:00 AM
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I haven't read through everything only because it is such an old post. But these are some of the issues I'm facing at the moment. I have a very sweet 4 1/2 month old and switch her from place to place through the day but do also cuddle/hold her a lot. (I love baby cuddling and cooing) But the sleeping is becoming a problem. I've talked with dcm as to how she does it at home. Says she lays in her crib and sleeps fine. I get a different story when she's with her dad(they live apart).
Some days she falls asleep in the crib, and can resettle if she wakes up. Other days(most days!) if I'm lucky she'll sleep 30 minutes then wake up and have no idea of going back to sleep so I get her up, trying to avoid all the nappers waking up. I know I have to 'get over' feeling like I have to get her up but I don't want to face 5 extremely grumpy fighting overtired kids for the rest of the day either.
Ex. yesterday she slept 3 half hour naps. The day before that in the p.m. she slept 2 hrs. because she settled herself down 2x and fell back to sleep.
I did notice she sleeps better if she rolls herself onto her side and cuddles into herself compared to flat on her back with her arms to her sides. As a matter of fact, so do I.

Any advice besides CIO because I'm not sure I can do that.
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Old 02-06-2017, 11:49 PM
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Have you looked into the zipadee zip? they were on Shark Tank. It was the only thing that helped my dcg sleep until she was 1 1/2. now she sleeps good on her own.
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Old 03-17-2017, 08:20 AM
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I hate the no sleeping in a swim regulation. It's outdated and should be updated. It should specify no sleeping in a swing sitting up. Lots of swings have bassinett attachements now. My fisher price swing has a cradle position...that is identical to the fisher price cradle. I had my own kid sleep in it, and I'd just turn the swing off when she fell asleep so that she didn't become dependant on the motion for sleep.
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Old 03-17-2017, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Josiegirl View Post
Some days she falls asleep in the crib, and can resettle if she wakes up. Other days(most days!) if I'm lucky she'll sleep 30 minutes then wake up and have no idea of going back to sleep so I get her up, trying to avoid all the nappers waking up. I know I have to 'get over' feeling like I have to get her up but I don't want to face 5 extremely grumpy fighting overtired kids for the rest of the day either.

Any advice besides CIO because I'm not sure I can do that.
First, I may not be understanding exactly what you are asking.

At 4.5 months, here, there is no sleep schedule. If awake, infant is on mats with toys in his/her own center. If sleepy infant is placed in crib on back. If still awake after 20 minutes or clearly upset, infant is placed back on mats with toys in his/her center. Rinse/repeat (obviously meeting needs/care concerns throughout day for lurkers. )
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Old 03-17-2017, 08:51 AM
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Originally Posted by hwichlaz View Post
I hate the no sleeping in a swim regulation. It's outdated and should be updated. It should specify no sleeping in a swing sitting up. Lots of swings have bassinett attachements now. My fisher price swing has a cradle position...that is identical to the fisher price cradle. I had my own kid sleep in it, and I'd just turn the swing off when she fell asleep so that she didn't become dependant on the motion for sleep.
Safe sleep rules say approved cribs and/or PNP's only.

NO cradles, no rock and plays, no bassinets.

Cribs MUST come with the manufacturers certificate of compliance too.

The swing thing probably isn't that huge of a deal for rule followers and those that are safety oriented but for those that aren't, swings are nothing more than death traps.

They provide an easy way to soothe baby and not really have to do anything. I can't believe the number of veteran providers that I personally know that will openly admit they allow infants to sleep in swings simply because that's the way they've always done it. Kind of like when you hear an older parent say "We didn't even have car seats and the kids are fine" line of thinking....

It's those providers that take the ability from everyone else to use common sense.

(None of that ^^^ was directed at you... I just happen to have had that convo with a veteran provider I am friends with just this morning when I asked how she was handling her all day crier baby)

Curious, I know California is pretty strict with some of their rules....does your licensing allow you to use your swing cradle as approved for safe sleep?
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Old 03-17-2017, 08:53 AM
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Originally Posted by hwichlaz View Post
Lots of swings have bassinett attachements now.
They are not rated for sleep. For sleep the device must meet 16 CFR 1219 or 16 CFR 1220.

It isn't personal. It is liability and insurance law.
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Old 03-17-2017, 10:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Cat Herder View Post
First, I may not be understanding exactly what you are asking.

At 4.5 months, here, there is no sleep schedule. If awake, infant is on mats with toys in his/her own center. If sleepy infant is placed in crib on back. If still awake after 20 minutes or clearly upset, infant is placed back on mats with toys in his/her center. Rinse/repeat (obviously meeting needs/care concerns throughout day for lurkers. )
LOL this baby is now 6 months old and won't fall asleep in the crib. I'll get her almost asleep, lay her down. Maybe she'll sleep 30-45 minutes. And I'm talking her p.m. nap. She will sleep 9-9:30 every a.m. so should clearly be tired by noon or so. I just found out dcps are transitioning her this week from a rock and play to a crib. Makes me furious because I specifically asked dcm weeks ago if she was falling asleep ok at night in a crib. Mom says oh yep, no problem! Of course then, I felt I was doing something wrong. Dcm kept saying she couldn't understand why she wasn't sleeping for me.
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Old 03-17-2017, 10:25 AM
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In my state, if a baby falls asleep in a carseat or swing we have to transfer them to a crib as soon as possible.
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Old 03-18-2017, 01:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
Safe sleep rules say approved cribs and/or PNP's only.

NO cradles, no rock and plays, no bassinets.

Cribs MUST come with the manufacturers certificate of compliance too.

The swing thing probably isn't that huge of a deal for rule followers and those that are safety oriented but for those that aren't, swings are nothing more than death traps.

They provide an easy way to soothe baby and not really have to do anything. I can't believe the number of veteran providers that I personally know that will openly admit they allow infants to sleep in swings simply because that's the way they've always done it. Kind of like when you hear an older parent say "We didn't even have car seats and the kids are fine" line of thinking....

It's those providers that take the ability from everyone else to use common sense.

(None of that ^^^ was directed at you... I just happen to have had that convo with a veteran provider I am friends with just this morning when I asked how she was handling her all day crier baby)

Curious, I know California is pretty strict with some of their rules....does your licensing allow you to use your swing cradle as approved for safe sleep?
I am also surprised how many infants we have gotten lately who have been with other providers and sleep with blankets or in the swing/bouncer. My boss always informs parents at interview that none of that is allowed per safe sleep regulations, and they seem surprised. Our regs say everyone has to attend infant safety classes, so these providers are aware of the rules, but choose the easy way.
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Old 03-19-2017, 03:23 AM
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I'd like to know statistics on babies' deaths and being asleep in cribs vs. swings, car seats, etc. I know 'crib death' sadly happens. I thought I saw an article about SID possibly being attributed to something under-developed in a baby's brain, much like a person with sleep apnea. Did anyone else read this or did I remember it wrong.
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Old 03-20-2017, 05:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Josiegirl View Post
I'd like to know statistics on babies' deaths and being asleep in cribs vs. swings, car seats, etc. I know 'crib death' sadly happens. I thought I saw an article about SID possibly being attributed to something under-developed in a baby's brain, much like a person with sleep apnea. Did anyone else read this or did I remember it wrong.
http://cjfirstcandle.org/

You can find all the info you need above.
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