Default Style Register
Daycare.com Forum
Daycare Center and Family Home Forum>Montessori VS Traditional
LittleQueen 10:30 PM 09-26-2013
Hi Everyone,

So my boss's business manager told him the other day that it would be more lucrative to go the montessori route than stick with a traditional daycare. In the area that we operate in that is true but my question is, is there really a difference between the two? I know what montessori schools are about and it just seems to me that certain aspects can easily be made available in a traditional daycare (if it hasn't already been incorporated). Am I wrong?


Reply
Laurel 05:45 AM 09-27-2013
Originally Posted by LittleQueen:
Hi Everyone,

So my boss's business manager told him the other day that it would be more lucrative to go the montessori route than stick with a traditional daycare. In the area that we operate in that is true but my question is, is there really a difference between the two? I know what montessori schools are about and it just seems to me that certain aspects can easily be made available in a traditional daycare (if it hasn't already been incorporated). Am I wrong?

I personally love Montessori but I also think an excellent traditional daycare is good also. I honestly think it depends on the school. I have seen 2 not so good Montessori schools (worked in one) also.

My daughter was thinking of sending my almost 3 year old son to Montessori when he turned 3. I sent her to Montessori and she says it taught her a love of learning moreso than WHAT they taught. I asked her if she was sure as she was only in preschool at the time. Could she really remember that? I told her that since I was into Montessori back then and even before then had a "Montessori" mindset myself and my mom before me (hands on, concrete learning, 'follow the child' type of thinking, open art, etc.), could she really contribute it to a few years or a lifetime of the same kind of thinking?

It was also insanely expensive because their materials are expensive. I've checked!!

I do love the whole concept though and sent my 3 children...one until 2nd grade to a magnet Montessori school.

All that said, I would really judge the school and not the philosophy because my son went to one that pushed reading sooo hard that it was ridiculous which is just the opposite of the philosophy. To this day he hates to read.

Not sure if that was any help though.

Laurel
Reply
preschoolteacher 08:00 AM 09-27-2013
It really depends.

Some people think Montessori means buying all of the Montessori "things." In order to really be Montessori, you have to adopt the attitude and philosophy.

I have seen pretty awful daycares that call themselves Montessori because they have low, open shelves; specific kinds of toys; and a block of free time for children to choose their own activities. Any daycare has these elements.

In order to be really Montessori, you have to see children as capable and set up your entire environment so they can be self-sufficient (low beds for children to get into--no cribs; low chairs for children to sit on and eat--no highchairs) and you have to have a positive, gentle, democratic environment... so most don't do things like time-out, stickers for rewards (aka bribery), and so on...
Reply
Willow 08:04 AM 09-27-2013
I think beyond the initial investment it *could* be lucrative. The materials needed to run an actual Montessori though, and what it takes to become accredited can be super spendy.

Parents are definitely willing to spend more for specialized care, but to get to that level it's not just a label. There would need to be an almost complete overhaul on most traditional set ups to achieve the ideal set up.

(I personally settle for "Montessori inspired" because I don't have the space to have the large multi aged integrated groups, the money to get rid of all plastics, or the time/energy needed to obtain the accreditation. My area wouldn't recognize or value the differences in that level of care either and that's another factor to consider.)
Reply
Heidi 08:07 AM 09-27-2013
In order to be an actual Montessori School, teachers would need to be trained and accredited. It's not just buying a bunch of wooden toys and saying "hey, this is Montessori".

One reason the schools are more expensive is because their teachers often have 4 year degrees, and have specialized training in the Montessori methods.

One could say they are "Montessori like" in there approach, but I think you'd have a harder time charging the premium rate then. Parents who care enough to seek out a Montessori School and pay higher rates would probably want to know who the school is accredited with.
Reply
Play Care 08:16 AM 09-27-2013
Originally Posted by Heidi:
In order to be an actual Montessori School, teachers would need to be trained and accredited. It's not just buying a bunch of wooden toys and saying "hey, this is Montessori".

One reason the schools are more expensive is because their teachers often have 4 year degrees, and have specialized training in the Montessori methods.

One could say they are "Montessori like" in there approach, but I think you'd have a harder time charging the premium rate then. Parents who care enough to seek out a Montessori School and pay higher rates would probably want to know who the school is accredited with.

Reply
SBarnard 12:14 PM 10-27-2015
We decided to take the Montessori route, based on our DD personality. I think its important to consider each child/family dynamics when making the decision. The structure & setting is best for our daughter but I think it can vary per child, even in the same family. Currently she's learning French (and teaching it to me!) Its fun and beautiful to see. Definitely compare a few schools to see what the best fit it for your daughter. We chose and couldnt be happier with the environment, teachers, student and curriculum. Best of luck!
Reply
Kelly 03:45 PM 10-28-2015
You do not have to be accredited to call your program Montessori. The name is not trademarked. There are some excellent non-accredited Montessori schools and so not-so-great ones that are accredited. It costs a lot to get accredited as a Montessori school.

I have been taking online Montessori training myself and am switching my daycare to a Montessori preschool program.
Reply
Tags:montessori
Reply Up