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  #1  
Old 07-07-2013, 06:39 AM
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Default CDA, Worth It?

I have my AA in Lib Arts, and am taking classes to get my AA in Early Childhood (eventually to have my BA in elementary/special ed) BUT that is obviously taking some time I have the opportunity to get my CDA in half the time it usually takes (30 hours opposed to 90 - still not sure about the logistics as they have an information session next month) I'm worried as I don't want to take time away from my main goal (getting my degree) At the same time I think being able have a fresh look into my program and being able to advertise that I have both an AA as well as a CDA (even in the AA isn't in EC) would be a huge boon for my program.

So for those who have done it, was it worth it? Did you gain any insight? Does it help attract clients? Would you do it again?
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Old 07-07-2013, 09:12 AM
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Honestly, I wouldn't bother.

According to my recollection a CDA is only a 16 credit certificate and/or credential where an AA is a 60 credit diploma....

An A.A.S or A.A is a diploma or degree (2+ yrs)

Hope that makes sense.

This is helpful in explaining the differences http://www.childcarenet.org/provider...-education-ece

The following certificates and degrees are general courses of study within the ECE field available at 2-year colleges in Washington State.

CDA Credential = The Child Development Associate (CDA) Credential is a nationally recognized credential awarded to individuals who have demonstrated competency through both experience and education in working with young children ages 0-5. The CDA Credential is awarded to infant/toddler child care teachers, preschool teachers or family child care providers.

ECE Certificate = The Early Child Education (ECE) Certificate is a 45-64 credit certificate program designed to meet Washington State requirements to become a program coordinator for a licensed child care center, teacher or teacher assistant in an early childhood classroom. Some colleges offer mini-ECE certificates that range from 10-30 credits.

AA Degree = The Associate in Arts degree represents the broad knowledge generally acquired in the first two years of a four-year program leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree. When you have earned the AA, you may transfer to a baccalaureate institution within the state of Washington with assurance that you have satisfied all or most of the basic requirements (General University Requirements/Distribution Requirements). This means, generally, that AA transfer students can begin work on their specialized, major-area course-work as soon as they transfer.

ATA/AAS Degree = The Associate in Technical Arts (ATA) or AAS Degree is designed to provide entry into a technical or semi-professional occupation or additional training for those students who wish to complete a program with a specific professional-technical career objective. These degree options differ from a certificate program in that they combine a specific job skill component with a breadth component. In general, an ATA or AAS program is designed to be a terminal degree, and is not meant to transfer to a 4-year college or university.

AAS-T Degree = The Associate of Applied Science-Technical degree in early childhood education is a two-year technical degree that prepares students for immediate employment and leaves the door open for the possibility of transfer to specific four-year institutions that have agreed to accept this type of degree. The AAS-T is a relatively new degree model that was approved by the Washington Association of Community and Technical College Presidents in March 2002. A typical course of study for an AAS-T degree in ECE might include 45-55 credits in ECE and 35 to 45 credits in general education.
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Old 07-07-2013, 11:04 AM
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I also believe you have to renew your cda unlike a degree.
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Old 07-07-2013, 02:18 PM
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I also believe you have to renew your cda unlike a degree.
This is also correct. A CDA Credential is valid for three years from the award date. A CDA Credential may only be renewed for the original setting, age-level endorsement, and specialization.

To renew, you must meet/complete the following 5 criteria

1. Documented proof of a current Red Cross or other agency Pediatric First Aid Certificate - the certification must include (1) treatment for blocked airway and (2) provide rescue breathing for infants and young children.

2. Documented proof of one of the following types of training in early childhood education/child development, principles of adult learning, mental health counseling, etc.:

- 4.5 Continuing Education Units (CEUs)
- a three-credit-hour course
- or 45 clock hours

These hours must be in addition to the original 120 clock hours required when the Candidate obtained the CDA Credential. Bilingual CDAs must meet this requirement with coursework incorporating bilingual issues.

3. Documented proof of recent (within past year) work or volunteer experience with young children or families of young children (a minimum of 80 hours). This should be verified with a letter on official letterhead from a supervisor (click here for an example).

4. A completed Letter of Recommendation Form regarding the CDA's competence with young children prepared by an early childhood education (ECE) Reviewer. The ECE Reviewer must meet the eligibility requirements.

5. Documented proof (within current year) of membership in a national or local early childhood professional organization

http://www.cdacouncil.org/the-cda-cr...renew-your-cda
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Old 07-07-2013, 02:41 PM
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There is no way to get it for less hour but if you have been taking classes you may have your hours already. Yes it is not as good as a degree but often when a class is offered there are perks to go along with it. when I worked on mine we got many freebies and they paid the cost of getting the CDA

It is not hard to renew now with online classes .
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  #6  
Old 07-07-2013, 05:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Play Care View Post
I have my AA in Lib Arts, and am taking classes to get my AA in Early Childhood (eventually to have my BA in elementary/special ed) BUT that is obviously taking some time I have the opportunity to get my CDA in half the time it usually takes (30 hours opposed to 90 - still not sure about the logistics as they have an information session next month) I'm worried as I don't want to take time away from my main goal (getting my degree) At the same time I think being able have a fresh look into my program and being able to advertise that I have both an AA as well as a CDA (even in the AA isn't in EC) would be a huge boon for my program.

So for those who have done it, was it worth it? Did you gain any insight? Does it help attract clients? Would you do it again?
It wasn't worth it to me. I didn't renew mine.

I suppose you could tell clients you have a CDA and explain what it is but really, the way I figure, parents can only pay so much. Some may pay more because you have a CDA but I've never even had a client who asked if I had any childcare degrees....ever... when they came for an interview.

No, I didn't gain any insight. It was all pretty much documenting everything I learned from my experience over the years.

Laurel
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Old 07-07-2013, 08:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Laurel View Post
It wasn't worth it to me. I didn't renew mine.

I suppose you could tell clients you have a CDA and explain what it is but really, the way I figure, parents can only pay so much. Some may pay more because you have a CDA but I've never even had a client who asked if I had any childcare degrees....ever... when they came for an interview.

No, I didn't gain any insight. It was all pretty much documenting everything I learned from my experience over the years.

Laurel
I have had one parent say anything about my Early education degree, and that was because they got assistant from the military and you had to have a degree for the military to pay. There is just one other childcare here in my town approved for this.
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Old 07-07-2013, 09:00 PM
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I don't think you gain anything being a home provider with a CDA, but if you ever plan on working out of your house it may be beneficial. In my area, the majority of preschools require a CDA and an AA. Daycares are requiring atleast a CDA and directors must have a CDA and a degree in some element of early childhood. Just something to keep in mind for the future!
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  #9  
Old 07-08-2013, 04:02 AM
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CDA is required with my license in Indiana.
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  #10  
Old 07-08-2013, 04:08 AM
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I don't want it because I think parents would pay more - I realize there is a cap to that But am hoping it would generate more interest in my program and keep my spots full. I am hoping that by year 3, my degree(s) will be finished and I will be working outside the home.

I am (beyond) ready at this point to be done with my 55+ hour work weeks and have my home just be my home...
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  #11  
Old 07-08-2013, 05:17 AM
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CDA is required with my license in Indiana.
I got my CDA because there was a rumor that Florida was going to require it but that never happened and here it is a couple of years later. They are still working on QRIS after YEARS so I'm not too concerned they will implement that either. I hope to be retired in a year or two anyway so I won't have to worry about it.

Laurel
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  #12  
Old 07-08-2013, 09:09 AM
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I wouldn't bother if I were you.

I have mine because I got it before I got my AA degree. My CDA expired and so I did not renew. However, recently they had a CDA amnesty renewal thing where you could renew if your CDA had expired within the last 3-5 yrs so I went ahead and did it. I am working toward my BA right now and will be done in Spring 2015 so I doubt I will renew after that.
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  #13  
Old 07-08-2013, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
Honestly, I wouldn't bother.

According to my recollection a CDA is only a 16 credit certificate and/or credential where an AA is a 60 credit diploma....

An A.A.S or A.A is a diploma or degree (2+ yrs)

Hope that makes sense.

This is helpful in explaining the differences http://www.childcarenet.org/provider...-education-ece

The following certificates and degrees are general courses of study within the ECE field available at 2-year colleges in Washington State.

CDA Credential = The Child Development Associate (CDA) Credential is a nationally recognized credential awarded to individuals who have demonstrated competency through both experience and education in working with young children ages 0-5. The CDA Credential is awarded to infant/toddler child care teachers, preschool teachers or family child care providers.

ECE Certificate = The Early Child Education (ECE) Certificate is a 45-64 credit certificate program designed to meet Washington State requirements to become a program coordinator for a licensed child care center, teacher or teacher assistant in an early childhood classroom. Some colleges offer mini-ECE certificates that range from 10-30 credits.

AA Degree = The Associate in Arts degree represents the broad knowledge generally acquired in the first two years of a four-year program leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree. When you have earned the AA, you may transfer to a baccalaureate institution within the state of Washington with assurance that you have satisfied all or most of the basic requirements (General University Requirements/Distribution Requirements). This means, generally, that AA transfer students can begin work on their specialized, major-area course-work as soon as they transfer.

ATA/AAS Degree = The Associate in Technical Arts (ATA) or AAS Degree is designed to provide entry into a technical or semi-professional occupation or additional training for those students who wish to complete a program with a specific professional-technical career objective. These degree options differ from a certificate program in that they combine a specific job skill component with a breadth component. In general, an ATA or AAS program is designed to be a terminal degree, and is not meant to transfer to a 4-year college or university.

AAS-T Degree = The Associate of Applied Science-Technical degree in early childhood education is a two-year technical degree that prepares s buttudents for immediate employment and leaves the door open for the possibility of transfer to specific four-year institutions that have agreed to accept this type of degree. The AAS-T is a relatively new degree model that was approved by the Washington Association of Community and Technical College Presidents in March 2002. A typical course of study for an AAS-T degree in ECE might include 45-55 credits in ECE and 35 to 45 credits in general education.
I was wondering what the difference in an AA and AS (or AAS) is. I have an Associate's in Applied Science-Child Development. I wonder if they gave me the wrong degree because everyone in child development seems to have an AA. Sorry to hijack this thread, but I have always wondered. Maybe I am reading what you posted wrong?
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  #14  
Old 07-08-2013, 01:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Play Care View Post
I have my AA in Lib Arts, and am taking classes to get my AA in Early Childhood (eventually to have my BA in elementary/special ed) BUT that is obviously taking some time I have the opportunity to get my CDA in half the time it usually takes (30 hours opposed to 90 - still not sure about the logistics as they have an information session next month) I'm worried as I don't want to take time away from my main goal (getting my degree) At the same time I think being able have a fresh look into my program and being able to advertise that I have both an AA as well as a CDA (even in the AA isn't in EC) would be a huge boon for my program.

So for those who have done it, was it worth it? Did you gain any insight? Does it help attract clients? Would you do it again?
I earned my AAS in child development and received my CDA first just because back when I earned my degree, all of the classes for a CDA counted towards my degree anyways so I just went through with it so I had something until I earned my degree.
I would not get it again because my degree is higher than the CDA so it wouldn't matter if I had the CDA or not.
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  #15  
Old 07-08-2013, 01:20 PM
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Originally Posted by melilley View Post
I was wondering what the difference in an AA and AS (or AAS) is. I have an Associate's in Applied Science-Child Development. I wonder if they gave me the wrong degree because everyone in child development seems to have an AA. Sorry to hijack this thread, but I have always wondered. Maybe I am reading what you posted wrong?
From my understanding (and I could very well be wrong) an A.A is the degree a person gets when that is all they intend to get.

An A.A.S degree is more intensive and geared towards those that plan to continue on towards their bachelors and/or masters.
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  #16  
Old 07-08-2013, 01:23 PM
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This is what my college's home page says about A.A and A.A.S degrees

The main difference between the A.A. degree and the A.A.S. degree is what students do with them after graduation. A.A. degree programs include general education and elective classes at the expense of the degree major.

Thereby, A.A.S. degree graduates tend to use their degrees to further their education by enrolling in a bachelor's degree program afterward. A.A.S. degree programs focus on the major and do not require many unrelated classes. Therefore, A.A.S. graduates learn more about their major and usually enter the workforce after graduation.


HTH
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Old 07-08-2013, 01:29 PM
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This is what my college's home page says about A.A and A.A.S degrees

The main difference between the A.A. degree and the A.A.S. degree is what students do with them after graduation. A.A. degree programs include general education and elective classes at the expense of the degree major.

Thereby, A.A.S. degree graduates tend to use their degrees to further their education by enrolling in a bachelor's degree program afterward. A.A.S. degree programs focus on the major and do not require many unrelated classes. Therefore, A.A.S. graduates learn more about their major and usually enter the workforce after graduation.


HTH
Thank you so much! I have always wondered and did some research, but didn't find the right info. I feel silly, you would think I would know what my own degree is....lol
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  #18  
Old 07-08-2013, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by melilley View Post
Thank you so much! I have always wondered and did some research, but didn't find the right info. I feel silly, you would think I would know what my own degree is....lol
Hey, don't feel bad...I actually had to ask AFTER I enrolled and my advisor explained it to me but then when you posted asking the same question, I had to go find the info again .... because I couldn't remember
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Old 07-08-2013, 02:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Blackcat31 View Post
This is what my college's home page says about A.A and A.A.S degrees

The main difference between the A.A. degree and the A.A.S. degree is what students do with them after graduation. A.A. degree programs include general education and elective classes at the expense of the degree major.

Thereby, A.A.S. degree graduates tend to use their degrees to further their education by enrolling in a bachelor's degree program afterward. A.A.S. degree programs focus on the major and do not require many unrelated classes. Therefore, A.A.S. graduates learn more about their major and usually enter the workforce after graduation.


HTH

The reason I got my AA was because I wanted to go on to get a BA and was told an AA was the way to go. I was told that an AAS was more for people who wanted to go right to work after the two years.
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Old 07-08-2013, 02:39 PM
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The reason I got my AA was because I wanted to go on to get a BA and was told an AA was the way to go. I was told that an AAS was more for people who wanted to go right to work after the two years.
LOL!! Apparently it is different for all colleges....

Like I said above, I could be totally wrong about it but that is how it was explained to me....and I copied what my college says about it....

Now I am going to have to look further into it....

Maybe the confusion lies in the fact that apparently there are 3 different types of degrees offered in my state;

A.A., A.S., A.A.S

Degree Definitions

Associate in Arts (AA Degree)

An associate in arts degree is awarded upon completion of a 60-credit academic program in the liberal arts and sciences without a named field of study and is designed for transfer to baccalaureate degree-granting institutions. An associate in arts degree requires completion of at least a 40-credit general education curriculum that fulfills the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum goal areas. An associate in arts degree may have one or more emphases of at least 9 credits each in liberal arts and science fields, provided there is an articulation agreement with a baccalaureate major offered by at least one system university. At least 20 credits in the associate in arts degree shall be taught by the faculty recommending the award. This requirement may be decreased upon recommendation of the faculty and approval by the president of the college or university.

Associate in Science (AS Degree)

An associate in science degree is awarded upon completion of a 60 credit academic program in scientific, technological, or other professional fields designed to transfer in its entirety to a related baccalaureate program by way of an articulation agreement. The associate in science degree is designed to transfer in its entirety to a related baccalaureate program by way of an articulation agreement. An associate in Science degrees may be awarded in either a broad or specific field of study.

Broad Field
A broad field associate in science degree transfers to all system universities offering related baccalaureate programs through a statewide articulation agreement. Broad fields may include areas such as (1) agriculture, (2) business, (3) computer and information sciences, (4) education, (5) engineering, (6) engineering technologies, (7) environmental sciences, (8) health sciences, and (9) natural sciences.

Specific Field
Specific field associate in science degrees may be designed for both transfer and employment. A specific field associate in science degree requires at least one articulation agreement between a community college, community and technical college, or technical college and a system university awarding a baccalaureate degree in a related discipline, unless the chancellor grants an exception.

The associate in science degree requires a minimum of 30 general education credits selected from at least six of the ten goal areas of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum. At least 20 credits in an associate in science degree shall be taught by the faculty recommending the award. This requirement may be decreased upon recommendation of the faculty and approval by the president of the college or university. A waiver may be granted to exceed a length of 60 credits when (1) the waiver criteria in Subpart C are met and (2) an articulation agreement specifies the transfer of a greater number of credits.

Associate in Applied Science (AAS Degree)

An associate in applied science degree is awarded upon completion of a 60 credit academic program in a named field of study in scientific, technological or other professional fields. An associate in applied science degree prepares students for employment in an occupation or range of occupations. An associate in applied science degree may also be accepted in transfer to a related baccalaureate program. An associate in applied science degree requires a minimum of 15 general education credits selected from at least three of the ten goal areas of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum. At least 30 credits shall be in the academic program's occupational or technical field of preparation. An associate in applied science degree may have one or more emphases of at least 9 credits each when there are at least 30 credits in the major that are common to the emphases. At least 20 credits in an associate in applied science shall be taught by the faculty recommending the award. This requirement may be decreased upon recommendation of the faculty and approval by the president of the college or university. A waiver may be granted to exceed a length of 60 credits when (1) the waiver criteria in Subpart C are met and (2) an articulation agreement, where applicable, specifies the transfer of a greater number of credits.


Does that help? Maybe every state is different. I am confused by all the initials for everything now days....
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  #21  
Old 10-27-2016, 09:48 AM
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I'm working on my CDA in Kentucky, does anyone know it would be valid if i moved to Rhode island once it's completed. Just wondering if they can travel with you or would I need to do it all over for the state of RI
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Old 10-27-2016, 10:20 AM
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I'm working on my CDA in Kentucky, does anyone know it would be valid if i moved to Rhode island once it's completed. Just wondering if they can travel with you or would I need to do it all over for the state of RI
A CDA is a credential recognized in all states.

It doesn't matter where you got it.
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Old 10-27-2016, 10:20 AM
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I don't want it because I think parents would pay more - I realize there is a cap to that But am hoping it would generate more interest in my program and keep my spots full. I am hoping that by year 3, my degree(s) will be finished and I will be working outside the home.

I am (beyond) ready at this point to be done with my 55+ hour work weeks and have my home just be my home...


imho, no. I have it and it is about to expire. I am not renewing it. My AA (now BA) in ECE has attracted more attention to my program than the CDA. Most parents don't even know what it is, and the ONE parent who did called it the "CNA of the child care field"

Can you take online courses towards your AA in ECE or EC development?

Right now, jobs in ECE in my area are either AA in a related field, or CDA/significant experience. They pay pretty low (imho) 10-12/hr.

BA in a related field + experience jobs locally are 15-17/hr+ and are mostly desk jobs. I know, I just applied for two.
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  #24  
Old 10-27-2016, 10:33 AM
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imho, no. I have it and it is about to expire. I am not renewing it. My AA (now BA) in ECE has attracted more attention to my program than the CDA. Most parents don't even know what it is, and the ONE parent who did called it the "CNA of the child care field"

Can you take online courses towards your AA in ECE or EC development?

Right now, jobs in ECE in my area are either AA in a related field, or CDA/significant experience. They pay pretty low (imho) 10-12/hr.

BA in a related field + experience jobs locally are 15-17/hr+ and are mostly desk jobs. I know, I just applied for two.
I had completely forgotten about this thread!

I am currently getting my CDA but only because it's being paid for by the union. I am going to take that, along with my AA in LA to SUNY's online college (where I also have a ton of extra credits hanging around ) and see if I can parlay that into an AA in ECE. That would at least get me a TA position. Right now my Liberal Arts degree qualifies me for nothing but maybe answering phones (and probably not even that as my computing skills are gone ) Ideally I would like to work at Head Start to start and then move on to a UPK once I get my BA (which I would use any financial aid from HS to get as our HS does that) But we will see. I like working with kids, and I like the idea of NOT being a lead teacher. I'm at the point that I want to go in, do what they tell me to, and leave.
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Old 10-27-2016, 10:58 AM
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oh my gosh I thought this was a recent thread! I never look at the dates! OOOPS!

Good plan! I am the same way at this point. One last chance of DC in spring at the new house and then I'm calling it quits.
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