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  #1  
Old 02-22-2011, 01:04 PM
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Default Reading in K

Our state just adopted guidelines/standards that all kids need to be reading at a level 4 (leveled books they read in school) by the end of Kindergarten. In the past our state standards was "ready to read" by the end of K. This meant they had all the pre reading skills- like phonome segmentation, first letter sounds, alliteration, nonsense word recognition, knew all capital and lowercase letters etc. Each K kid was tested at the start, middle and end of K to determine if they were meeting this old standard. With the new standard they will still be tested 3 times but with more rigor and much harder demands.

I have young ones now and none going to K next year. How many have readers by K and GOOD readers in K? What strategies do you use to get them ready?

Does anyone know and keep current on their states guidelines (as I do)?
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Old 02-22-2011, 01:29 PM
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My two sons who are SA were reading before k (k-1st grade reading levels). Our district uses an a-z scale for reading, not sure how that measures to your levels. Level A is learning sight words. They like kids to be at least a Level C coming out of K. My kids have far surpassed the goal (2nd-3rd grade reading levels).

I just read a lot, have books all around, have been working on sounds since they were old enough to be interested in books, on writing since they had in an interest in drawing actual things . I don't really know what I am doing differently than others out there. I wish i could take all the credit but I honestly don't know what exactly is working other than plenty of exposure and practice.

Last edited by DCMomOf3; 02-22-2011 at 01:31 PM.
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Old 02-22-2011, 01:40 PM
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Our state just adopted guidelines/standards that all kids need to be reading at a level 4 (leveled books they read in school) by the end of Kindergarten. In the past our state standards was "ready to read" by the end of K. This meant they had all the pre reading skills- like phonome segmentation, first letter sounds, alliteration, nonsense word recognition, knew all capital and lowercase letters etc. Each K kid was tested at the start, middle and end of K to determine if they were meeting this old standard. With the new standard they will still be tested 3 times but with more rigor and much harder demands.

I have young ones now and none going to K next year. How many have readers by K and GOOD readers in K? What strategies do you use to get them ready?

Does anyone know and keep current on their states guidelines (as I do)?
What is the school going to do if the kid can't read by the end of Kindy and how does that affect home child care? Do you get a bonus if your day care kids CAN read by the end of Kindy? If there isn't money attached to their success I would stay out of it.
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Old 02-22-2011, 03:17 PM
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Default Reading in kindy

I really don't like the way that the public schools in my area are teaching children how to read. I know that there are probably a lot of reasons why teaching sight words works but all I can think about is how when I was a little kid, I learned so much by sounding words out. That's actually discouraged in the schools here. I don't teach my daycare kids how to read here and I don't advertise that I will do it. I don't offer kindergarten readiness lesson plans but I'll give parents the information for junior kindergarten classes and provide care as long as the parents can work out the transportation for the kid.
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Old 02-22-2011, 06:52 PM
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Default Reading at Kindergarden age,what are your thoughts....

Why do schools want kids to be reading in kindergarten these days? What has happened to the days of letting kids be kids and kindergarten was a fun & exciting time for kids to START learning things and learning to get along with a bunch of other kids,not a time when the kids HAD to be or sort of be reading by then. My gosh, those kids are only 5 yrs old. I guess I have given my age away, not in my 20's for sure. But why do kids have to be so grown up already by that age. Kids should be able to use their imaginations, be able to play and also start the learning process in kindergarten, but not have to be already reading is my thinking.
Why do kids have to be expected to supposedly be so educated by the time they are 5 yrs old these days? Our society today is what is forcing parents to feel as though their child has to be the smartest child or we have failed as parents, which is ridiculous. Does any one else have these same thoughts as I do, or am I the only one who thinks they expect to much of kids these days at such a young age?
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Old 02-22-2011, 07:49 PM
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I know that there are probably a lot of reasons why teaching sight words works but all I can think about is how when I was a little kid, I learned so much by sounding words out. That's actually discouraged in the schools here.
Where do you live? That is definitely NOT the case here. They are highly encouraged to sound words out when reading, and to attempt "Kindergarten Spelling", which means they write sentences or even paragraphs by themselves by just sounding out the word and spelling it however they think it sounds. It looks like a bunch of gibberish, but it helps them to learn what sounds the letters make. I'm surprised your school district's curriculum would discourage this.
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Old 02-23-2011, 06:40 AM
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the kids here do sight words, so my dd is in grade 1 and she struggles with some words because she has never been taught to sound the words out properly. This goes with spelling, my ds in grade 3 struggles in spelling because he doesn't know how to spell and sound the words out.
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Old 02-23-2011, 06:48 AM
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My DD is in kindergarten right now. She is supposed to be at level C (which coincides with level 4) before she can move to grade 1. She's there right now and still has 3 full months left.

I have been frustrated too with the emphasis on sight words and not so much with sounding words out. They don't want them to get confused, b/c the letters don't always make the same sounds in every word. I agree that this type of teaching will probably cause problems with spelling later on. I myself still encourage her to sound the words out, and she does just fine when she's at home.
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Old 02-23-2011, 06:59 AM
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My DD is in kindergarten right now. She is supposed to be at level C (which coincides with level 4) before she can move to grade 1. She's there right now and still has 3 full months left.

I have been frustrated too with the emphasis on sight words and not so much with sounding words out. They don't want them to get confused, b/c the letters don't always make the same sounds in every word. I agree that this type of teaching will probably cause problems with spelling later on. I myself still encourage her to sound the words out, and she does just fine when she's at home.
this is what I do too. I have never heard of sight words till my 3rd kid was in grade 1. My other 2 kids had to sound everything out and now they have to guess the words.
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Old 02-23-2011, 07:03 AM
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this is what I do too. I have never heard of sight words till my 3rd kid was in grade 1. My other 2 kids had to sound everything out and now they have to guess the words.
I still teach my boys to sound out their words, including sight words. The reason they are called sight words is because these are the first words they should learn to recognize by sight instead of sounding them out each time they are seen. If introduced properly they should assist in reading not hinder it.
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Old 02-23-2011, 07:17 AM
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I'm in MN, and I don't know if this is a state thing, but at the Kindergarten info meeting, they said that the kids should be reading a majority of the provided sight words by the end of kindergarten. It's not exactly a requirement, but more of a goal. So it's not really at a reading book level, just sight words.
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Old 02-23-2011, 07:38 AM
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It is sadly because of new rules like these that have created parents keeping their kids out of kindergarten for one more year. I have had 2 different families not send their kids to K till they were 6. They then turned 7 when leaving K. They expect so much out of kids anymore that a large majority of them just don't have the skills to do yet. My oldest and youngest are 5 years apart in school and the changes that have been implemented in that time are astounding. She was working on things in 1st grade that he worked on in 3rd. It's insane.
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Old 02-23-2011, 08:12 AM
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Actually I live in MN and the state standards were just modified to include the clause that they need to be reading at a level 4 reader before the end of school.

I think it is my obligation to get kids ready for school and yes that means keeping current on what is considered "ready". Obviously twenty yrs ago being ready and now are two different things and I think if would be completely irresponsible to just keep sending kids with out knowing what the standards are and making attempts to get kids to those marks. No technically nobody from the state or school district is paying me to get these kids ready but the parents are paying me and I doubt anyone would be pleased sending their kids to a daycare that didn't know what kids needed to be ready for K and adapt accordingly. Who would want the kids in their daycare to get to K and then find out they are behind the eight ball? Even if you don't like that kids nowadays need to know "so much more than in the past" and it seems they "cant just be kids anymore" it is reality and needs to be addressed before they get to K.

Our district says that if they can't read to state standards (which are very high in MN) by the end of k they have a 1 in 8 chance of graduating. Sure makes that first year at school important huh.
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Old 02-23-2011, 09:22 AM
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Actually I live in MN and the state standards were just modified to include the clause that they need to be reading at a level 4 reader before the end of school.

I think it is my obligation to get kids ready for school and yes that means keeping current on what is considered "ready". Obviously twenty yrs ago being ready and now are two different things and I think if would be completely irresponsible to just keep sending kids with out knowing what the standards are and making attempts to get kids to those marks. No technically nobody from the state or school district is paying me to get these kids ready but the parents are paying me and I doubt anyone would be pleased sending their kids to a daycare that didn't know what kids needed to be ready for K and adapt accordingly. Who would want the kids in their daycare to get to K and then find out they are behind the eight ball? Even if you don't like that kids nowadays need to know "so much more than in the past" and it seems they "cant just be kids anymore" it is reality and needs to be addressed before they get to K.

Our district says that if they can't read to state standards (which are very high in MN) by the end of k they have a 1 in 8 chance of graduating. Sure makes that first year at school important huh.
Hey! I'm a MN girl too! Would you mind sharing where you got that information?
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Old 02-23-2011, 09:31 AM
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Actually I live in MN and the state standards were just modified to include the clause that they need to be reading at a level 4 reader before the end of school.

I think it is my obligation to get kids ready for school and yes that means keeping current on what is considered "ready". Obviously twenty yrs ago being ready and now are two different things and I think if would be completely irresponsible to just keep sending kids with out knowing what the standards are and making attempts to get kids to those marks. No technically nobody from the state or school district is paying me to get these kids ready but the parents are paying me and I doubt anyone would be pleased sending their kids to a daycare that didn't know what kids needed to be ready for K and adapt accordingly. Who would want the kids in their daycare to get to K and then find out they are behind the eight ball? Even if you don't like that kids nowadays need to know "so much more than in the past" and it seems they "cant just be kids anymore" it is reality and needs to be addressed before they get to K.

Our district says that if they can't read to state standards (which are very high in MN) by the end of k they have a 1 in 8 chance of graduating. Sure makes that first year at school important huh.
Nah

This doesn't have anything to do with child care.

If the State believes that children need to have these skills before Kindy then they need to work with the parents to get the kids ready. If the parents want to hire it out then great... or they can do it at home with their child.

I don't see where it has to do with child care? Can you explain that? Are you talking about providers getting paid additional funds to do "school readiness" with their day care kids?

If there is money in it I think there will be a HUGE response from providers. If it's expected for free... not so much. If it's going to be an "obligation" then it needs to be a highly paid "obligation".
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Old 02-23-2011, 09:44 AM
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Actually I live in MN and the state standards were just modified to include the clause that they need to be reading at a level 4 reader before the end of school.

I think it is my obligation to get kids ready for school and yes that means keeping current on what is considered "ready". Obviously twenty yrs ago being ready and now are two different things and I think if would be completely irresponsible to just keep sending kids with out knowing what the standards are and making attempts to get kids to those marks. No technically nobody from the state or school district is paying me to get these kids ready but the parents are paying me and I doubt anyone would be pleased sending their kids to a daycare that didn't know what kids needed to be ready for K and adapt accordingly. Who would want the kids in their daycare to get to K and then find out they are behind the eight ball? Even if you don't like that kids nowadays need to know "so much more than in the past" and it seems they "cant just be kids anymore" it is reality and needs to be addressed before they get to K.

Our district says that if they can't read to state standards (which are very high in MN) by the end of k they have a 1 in 8 chance of graduating. Sure makes that first year at school important huh.

I'm a MN girl also. I totally disagree with you though. I provide daycare while the parents are at work, but am not a teacher and surely doesn't get paid enough to be one for preschoolers also.
I do believe that it is not our place as providers, to HAVE to teach reading so they are ready for K. I think the place belongs to the parents to be doing that. My responsibility is to take care of the kids for the parents so they can work themselves, if it wasn't for us, the parents would not be able to work, but we should not have to be the teacher also. Now I am an in-home provider , not a daycare center provider, which is different. There are preschools for the kids to go to if the parents want them to be ready for K,that is what a preschool is for. They expect so much out of the children today at such young
age. I think if you want to teach your daycare kids to read, that is totally up to you, but I don't think it is totally our responsibility to do so,and I do think it is expecting too much of such young kids at k age to have to be reading.
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Old 02-23-2011, 10:21 AM
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As a parent of a child currently in K; I think the new state guidelines for reading at level 4 or level C is really not as harsh as everyone thinks. The teachers and parents work together to achieve this regardless of the knowledge they had before they entered kindergarten. My DD was no where near able to read before she entered K. She knew her alphabet by sight and sound, she could write her upper case letters but was struggling with her lower case. She has grown leaps and bounds during kindergarten and is already where she needs to be to get to first grade.
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Old 02-23-2011, 10:36 AM
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As a parent of a child currently in K; I think the new state guidelines for reading at level 4 or level C is really not as harsh as everyone thinks. The teachers and parents work together to achieve this regardless of the knowledge they had before they entered kindergarten. My DD was no where near able to read before she entered K. She knew her alphabet by sight and sound, she could write her upper case letters but was struggling with her lower case. She has grown leaps and bounds during kindergarten and is already where she needs to be to get to first grade.
Wonderful! Good for your child!
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Old 02-23-2011, 10:48 AM
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I think you should start calling yourself babysitters since you don't want to step up and support the kids in their learning as a professional would.

So basically you are there for wiping noses and bottoms, feeding them 2-3 meals and nothing else. Huh. Hope your parents know that when they sign up. And hope they aren't paying you squat to do so.

I would be embarrassed to tell my parents I wasn't trying to get their kids ready for school including any new standards that were sent our way.

How many hrs a week are they there with you? Doesnt anyone remember that the first 5 yrs are the most crucial in a kids life and every thing possible should be done to enhance their learning at this age. ???

BTW- I recieved our info on updated standards through a professional group I belong to that works in conjuntion with MDE to provide quality care to these little ones. And yes I work as an in-home provider however I do have my teaching license and get paid accordingly.
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Old 02-23-2011, 11:29 AM
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I think you should start calling yourself babysitters since you don't want to step up and support the kids in their learning as a professional would.

So basically you are there for wiping noses and bottoms, feeding them 2-3 meals and nothing else. Huh. Hope your parents know that when they sign up. And hope they aren't paying you squat to do so.

I would be embarrassed to tell my parents I wasn't trying to get their kids ready for school including any new standards that were sent our way.

How many hrs a week are they there with you? Doesnt anyone remember that the first 5 yrs are the most crucial in a kids life and every thing possible should be done to enhance their learning at this age. ???

BTW- I recieved our info on updated standards through a professional group I belong to that works in conjuntion with MDE to provide quality care to these little ones. And yes I work as an in-home provider however I do have my teaching license and get paid accordingly.
So that is the service you offer and you get paid accordingly. That's excellent.

I don't know many providers who are being paid child care fees plus educational service fees. That's the problem. They aren't one and the same.

You say the first five years of life are the most crucial and EVERYTHING possible should be done. If that is true then the person doing EVERYTHING should be VERY highly paid.

You said: So basically you are there for wiping noses and bottoms, feeding them 2-3 meals and nothing else.

My babysitting services include: close proximal supervision (a one adult to four child ratio), excellent (fully organic home made from scratch meals) nutrition, free play with an outstanding toy collection for birth to five, outdoor exercise (45 minute hike every possible day), GOOD DEEP SLEEP (2.5-3 hour afternoon nap) , discipline, and affection.

I get paid for good CARE. If they have an early childhood of good care they will be great students.
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Old 02-23-2011, 11:29 AM
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Why is it always "unregistered" that likes to call everyone else out?

I have said it a MILLION times and I will say it again.....

I am NOT a TEACHER!!!!

I am a Childcare Provider, also known as a BABYSITTER, who literally provides CARE to infants and toddlers, for pay, while their parents work.....

If parents want a teacher they will need to PAY FOR a Pre-School who employs them......
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Old 02-23-2011, 11:41 AM
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I think you should start calling yourself babysitters since you don't want to step up and support the kids in their learning as a professional would.

So basically you are there for wiping noses and bottoms, feeding them 2-3 meals and nothing else. Huh. Hope your parents know that when they sign up. And hope they aren't paying you squat to do so.

I would be embarrassed to tell my parents I wasn't trying to get their kids ready for school including any new standards that were sent our way.

How many hrs a week are they there with you? Doesnt anyone remember that the first 5 yrs are the most crucial in a kids life and every thing possible should be done to enhance their learning at this age. ???

BTW- I recieved our info on updated standards through a professional group I belong to that works in conjuntion with MDE to provide quality care to these little ones. And yes I work as an in-home provider however I do have my teaching license and get paid accordingly.
Well, good for you! I'm glad you get paid accordingly. I do not! I also don't have a teaching license. So what if you consider me a babysitter,that is what we do and what babysitter's do, watch children while their parents are not home. They call us daycare providers because, we watch children during the day and provider care, right! I don't think it is our responsibility get the children ready for school,parents these days are dropping the ball and letting others teach their children with what they should be doing themselves. I know this post is not about this,but it really irks me when you and others say it is our responsibility to get the kids ready for school, it is not for us to do, it is the parents who need to step up and do this. Parents are taking us providers for granted and trying to get us to do all things that they should be doing. I think it is wonderful if you want to teach the kids, nothing wrong with that, but I don't think you need to say we are not doing our job in taking care of, or not loving the kids and giving them the attention that they deserve. Do you wipe noses, butts and feed the kids? If you do and I hope you do, you are doing the same thing I am. We are all doing this because we love the kids and that is the main reason for doing daycare. I don't mean any ill feelings here, just speaking my mind. I'm happy you do teach the kids and love doing it.
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Old 02-23-2011, 11:46 AM
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Why is it always "unregistered" that likes to call everyone else out?

I have said it a MILLION times and I will say it again.....

I am NOT a TEACHER!!!!

I am a Childcare Provider, also known as a BABYSITTER, who literally provides CARE to infants and toddlers, for pay, while their parents work.....

If parents want a teacher they will need to PAY FOR a Pre-School who employs them......
I also am unregistered, but not the one that keeps calling everyone else out. I agree with you 100%. You are so right on. Thank You!
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Old 02-23-2011, 11:58 AM
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I could spend time teaching the kids reading and all sorts of educational school readiness stuff IF I wasn't so busy teaching them things like using the toilet, how to use table manners, how to be nice to other kids and how to master life-skills and self-help skills......
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Old 02-23-2011, 12:00 PM
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Why is it always "unregistered" that likes to call everyone else out?

I have said it a MILLION times and I will say it again.....

I am NOT a TEACHER!!!!

I am a Childcare Provider, also known as a BABYSITTER, who literally provides CARE to infants and toddlers, for pay, while their parents work.....

If parents want a teacher they will need to PAY FOR a Pre-School who employs them......
What she said.

Have teachers teach kids and pay them a teachers wage, give them benefits, and PAY THEIR UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE.
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Old 02-23-2011, 12:12 PM
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I could spend time teaching the kids reading and all sorts of educational school readiness stuff IF I wasn't so busy teaching them things like using the toilet, how to use table manners, how to be nice to other kids and how to master life-skills and self-help skills......
I agree 110%.

We are creating self-sufficent, confident, well behaved (hopefully!) little people who will leave us and be a joy for their kindergarten teacher, because they know how to put on their coat and zip it, use the bathroom, can sit quietly with listening ears, eat their veggies at lunchtime and are ready to take the leap into learning that is kindergarten.

That's when the people who are paid to teach take over ~ we have done our job.
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Old 02-23-2011, 12:25 PM
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I agree 110%.

We are creating self-sufficent, confident, well behaved (hopefully!) little people who will leave us and be a joy for their kindergarten teacher, because they know how to put on their coat and zip it, use the bathroom, can sit quietly with listening ears, eat their veggies at lunchtime and are ready to take the leap into learning that is kindergarten.

That's when the people who are paid to teach take over ~ we have done our job.
Hear Hear DCMom Advanced Daycare.com Member

I'll betcha if you surveyed Kindy teachers and asked them what they REALLY want they would hands down say bring me a NICE kid who has had the first five years with excellent nutrition, lots of exercise, good deep sleep, RESPECT for adults, good friends, self entertainment skills, and lots of lovin.

Promise ya...

The ABC's and the 123's come REAL easy for a kid who has had THAT the first five years of life.

Oh and I want "Advanced Daycare.com Member". How much does THAT cost?
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Old 02-23-2011, 12:27 PM
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Hear Hear DCMom Advanced Daycare.com Member

Oh and I want "Advanced Daycare.com Member". How much does THAT cost?
yeah, I was wondering that myself!!
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Old 02-23-2011, 12:31 PM
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Hear Hear DCMom Advanced Daycare.com Member

I'll betcha if you surveyed Kindy teachers and asked them what they REALLY want they would hands down say bring me a NICE kid who has had the first five years with excellent nutrition, lots of exercise, good deep sleep, RESPECT for adults, good friends, self entertainment skills, and lots of lovin.

Promise ya...

The ABC's and the 123's come REAL easy for a kid who has had THAT the first five years of life.

Oh and I want "Advanced Daycare.com Member". How much does THAT cost?
LOL, I no idea how much that cost or how I got that! Michael, maybe you could answer that?!

And for the record, I have several friends who are K to 3 grade teachers and ask them all time for their advice on what I as a CHILD CARE PROVIDER can do to help them TEACH better. And it is summed up pretty well by what Nanny De and I had to say.
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Old 02-23-2011, 12:43 PM
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I think you should start calling yourself babysitters since you don't want to step up and support the kids in their learning as a professional would.

So basically you are there for wiping noses and bottoms, feeding them 2-3 meals and nothing else. Huh. Hope your parents know that when they sign up. And hope they aren't paying you squat to do so.

I would be embarrassed to tell my parents I wasn't trying to get their kids ready for school including any new standards that were sent our way.

How many hrs a week are they there with you? Doesnt anyone remember that the first 5 yrs are the most crucial in a kids life and every thing possible should be done to enhance their learning at this age. ???

BTW- I recieved our info on updated standards through a professional group I belong to that works in conjuntion with MDE to provide quality care to these little ones. And yes I work as an in-home provider however I do have my teaching license and get paid accordingly.
I don't think that a provider who doesn't teach the children in their care the academic material is no less a good provider than a provider who focuses on academics. This is why I feel this way. I think that children will be in school soon enough as it is and I would much rather work on the things like sharing, independence, learning patience, empathy and other things that don't get the same attention when the kids leave my house and head off to school.

I have no complaints from parents in regard to how I choose to spend my time with the kids here. My 3.5 year old dcg may not know how to read yet, but you know what she can do? She can share, listen, do things for herself, and she's a kind little girl.

That's what matters when they are young!
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Old 02-23-2011, 12:45 PM
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Go to your User cp panel and edit details. You should be able to reset your title (which would update based on your post count i think) or you can add your own custom one.
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Old 02-23-2011, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I think you should start calling yourself babysitters since you don't want to step up and support the kids in their learning as a professional would.

So basically you are there for wiping noses and bottoms, feeding them 2-3 meals and nothing else. Huh. Hope your parents know that when they sign up. And hope they aren't paying you squat to do so.

I would be embarrassed to tell my parents I wasn't trying to get their kids ready for school including any new standards that were sent our way.

How many hrs a week are they there with you? Doesnt anyone remember that the first 5 yrs are the most crucial in a kids life and every thing possible should be done to enhance their learning at this age. ???

BTW- I recieved our info on updated standards through a professional group I belong to that works in conjuntion with MDE to provide quality care to these little ones. And yes I work as an in-home provider however I do have my teaching license and get paid accordingly.
Cool...So you won't mind sharing that information. The name of the study or the name of the publication from which it came? I would even be OK with the name of the professional organization.

I don't pay much attention to statistics unless I read the study myself. There is a lot that goes in to truly understanding studies and statistics so I like to see for myself.
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Old 02-23-2011, 01:10 PM
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Missani Missani is offline
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Funny that this just came up. I just went to a preschool open house for a preschool that I was thinking of sending my son to, just out of curiousity. (If it matters, we decided not to send him because I want him home but went to see if it would be a good "out" from the other daycare kids. It seemed like an excellent preschool...anyway...)

The preschool is located within a K-8 school but is not "part" of the school. It is a separate entity. The preschool teachers asked the kindergarten teachers what they most wanted the kids to know before entering kindergarten. Here is the list:

Letter recognition and letter sounds (upper and lowercase recognition)
How to write their name
How to count and recognize numbers from 1-20
How to use the bathroom independently, including buttoning pants
How to sit quietly in a group and be able to stand in line
How to get along with other kids
How to get themselves ready to go outside
How to respect property and other people

I thought that was a great list. More social than academic. I agree that parents should spend time teaching their kids the academics and take the resposiblility to make sure they are ready for school. With that said, they are here 40-50 hours/week and I have time to teach them, too. I enjoy teaching, and I think kids enjoy learning in a group with other kids. For that reason, I do teach numbers and letters, etc. I also teach them independence and respect. Both are important, and to me, both deserve my time. I want them to be respectful individuals who receive my care, my love, and my affection. I also want them to know how to be part of a group, be able to take care of themselves (as developmentally appropriate), and have the education to be ready for school. I also want them to have time to play and explore their world. I am just looking to "graduate" well rounded individuals.
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Old 02-23-2011, 01:26 PM
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I don't think that a provider who doesn't teach the children in their care the academic material is no less a good provider than a provider who focuses on academics. This is why I feel this way. I think that children will be in school soon enough as it is and I would much rather work on the things like sharing, independence, learning patience, empathy and other things that don't get the same attention when the kids leave my house and head off to school.

I have no complaints from parents in regard to how I choose to spend my time with the kids here. My 3.5 year old dcg may not know how to read yet, but you know what she can do? She can share, listen, do things for herself, and she's a kind little girl.

That's what matters when they are young!
Thank you,Thank you!!!!! Nicely said! We think alike! WE teach the kids life skills,which is very important! They need to know those before anything else. Can you imagine a kindergardin child not being potty trained because it was more important to to be taught to know how to read then being taught how to go potty! ( Just a thought,but not reality.)
I'm with you on all this and wish other's would not put us down as providers for teaching life skills.
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Old 02-23-2011, 01:58 PM
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I am in a foul, foul, cranky mood today so ........just for today I want " advanced daycare cranky pants" below my name.
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Old 02-23-2011, 03:24 PM
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Okay - first let me say that I have tried to respond to this post several times and haven't figured out how to say what I want without offending anyone. So, I will say that what I am saying below is MY PERSONAL OPINION and is not meant to offend anyone......

To me providing quality care for children up to age 5 or Kindergarten means that I will prepare them for Kindergarten. Most of the children are here 10 hours/day. That is more than enough time to teach them basic self help skills AND Kindergarten readiness skills. Most of the time parents spend 2-3 hours at home with their kids during the week and that time is spent on dinner, bath, etc. I rarely have parents pull their kids to put them in a "real" preschool because here they are getting everything they would there and more because of the lower ratios. Most of the children that have graduated and moved on to Kindergarten excel in their class and I have received numerous thanks from their parents. I even have one dcp who is a Kindergarten teacher and now has a former dc as a student. Even though her child attends here, she was still amazed at how much the former dc learned here.

We as providers can not continue to complain that we are not respected for what we do and are only looked on as babysitters when that is all we do. If we want to change the way this profession is viewed then we need to change the way we conduct ourselves and the way we do business.

Whether we like it or not, what is expected of children when they enter/leave Kindergarten is a lot more than it was 20, 10, or even 5 years ago. You don't have to have a teaching license to be able to teach the children what they need to know to prepare them for Kindergarten. It also does not need to be done in a formal sit down way. Children this age learn best through play and when done right, you will be amazed at the skills a child can learn.
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Old 02-23-2011, 04:45 PM
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Actually I live in MN and the state standards were just modified to include the clause that they need to be reading at a level 4 reader before the end of school.

I think it is my obligation to get kids ready for school and yes that means keeping current on what is considered "ready". Obviously twenty yrs ago being ready and now are two different things and I think if would be completely irresponsible to just keep sending kids with out knowing what the standards are and making attempts to get kids to those marks. No technically nobody from the state or school district is paying me to get these kids ready but the parents are paying me and I doubt anyone would be pleased sending their kids to a daycare that didn't know what kids needed to be ready for K and adapt accordingly. Who would want the kids in their daycare to get to K and then find out they are behind the eight ball? Even if you don't like that kids nowadays need to know "so much more than in the past" and it seems they "cant just be kids anymore" it is reality and needs to be addressed before they get to K.

Our district says that if they can't read to state standards (which are very high in MN) by the end of k they have a 1 in 8 chance of graduating. Sure makes that first year at school important huh.
Were you able to find that information? I just looked on the MN education standards and I don't see anything like that at all. Maybe I'm missing it! Can you point it out?

http://education.state.mn.us/MDE/gro...ion/001070.pdf
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Old 02-23-2011, 05:55 PM
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Originally Posted by snbauser View Post
Okay - first let me say that I have tried to respond to this post several times and haven't figured out how to say what I want without offending anyone. So, I will say that what I am saying below is MY PERSONAL OPINION and is not meant to offend anyone......

To me providing quality care for children up to age 5 or Kindergarten means that I will prepare them for Kindergarten. Most of the children are here 10 hours/day. That is more than enough time to teach them basic self help skills AND Kindergarten readiness skills. Most of the time parents spend 2-3 hours at home with their kids during the week and that time is spent on dinner, bath, etc. I rarely have parents pull their kids to put them in a "real" preschool because here they are getting everything they would there and more because of the lower ratios. Most of the children that have graduated and moved on to Kindergarten excel in their class and I have received numerous thanks from their parents. I even have one dcp who is a Kindergarten teacher and now has a former dc as a student. Even though her child attends here, she was still amazed at how much the former dc learned here.

We as providers can not continue to complain that we are not respected for what we do and are only looked on as babysitters when that is all we do. If we want to change the way this profession is viewed then we need to change the way we conduct ourselves and the way we do business.

Whether we like it or not, what is expected of children when they enter/leave Kindergarten is a lot more than it was 20, 10, or even 5 years ago. You don't have to have a teaching license to be able to teach the children what they need to know to prepare them for Kindergarten. It also does not need to be done in a formal sit down way. Children this age learn best through play and when done right, you will be amazed at the skills a child can learn.
I don't think what you posted was offensive at all, actually you sound quite sweet...

Here kids go to free pre-school offered by the State when they turn 4, soon to be 3 , I cannot compete with that. YKWIM?

Stay at home Mothers who hope to keep a few small kids, with her own, so she can afford to stay home are now FORCED to get a CDA or other ECE credentials, BUT are still unable to compete with Free.

These forced credentials are NOT college transferable and cost about $1500 out of pocket with constant/yearly "fee-fees" and more and more classes to keep them. The providers who can afford them do the whole "Stars on Thars" routine straight from Dr. Suess himself (come on, sing it..."A toast! Raise your marshmallow sticks"....) .....

That is where the bitterness comes in, not about doing ABC'S with the kids. Obviously, we love kids or we would be ANYWHERE else..

In my personal situation, before the State took half my income, I did work on basic readiness skills and had great success with a few of my kiddos getting full-ride scholarships to the local private school.

I think most of us "old schoolers" have a problem with the "Child Led" instructional approach and our being forced to teach to a curriculum set by a standardized test.... Kids just end up missing out on their childhoods....
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Old 02-23-2011, 07:50 PM
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QUOTING

"close proximal supervision (a one adult to four child ratio), excellent (fully organic home made from scratch meals) nutrition, free play with an outstanding toy collection for birth to five, outdoor exercise (45 minute hike every possible day), GOOD DEEP SLEEP (2.5-3 hour afternoon nap) , discipline, and affection."

"excellent nutrition, lots of exercise, good deep sleep, RESPECT for adults, good friends, self entertainment skills, and lots of lovin."

I've read this resume so many times per day that I could quote it.
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Old 02-24-2011, 05:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
QUOTING

"close proximal supervision (a one adult to four child ratio), excellent (fully organic home made from scratch meals) nutrition, free play with an outstanding toy collection for birth to five, outdoor exercise (45 minute hike every possible day), GOOD DEEP SLEEP (2.5-3 hour afternoon nap) , discipline, and affection."

"excellent nutrition, lots of exercise, good deep sleep, RESPECT for adults, good friends, self entertainment skills, and lots of lovin."

I've read this resume so many times per day that I could quote it.
So could a parrot, but has it sunk in yet???????
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Old 02-24-2011, 08:06 AM
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So could a parrot, but has it sunk in yet???????
OMG!!! Thank you for the laugh!!!!!
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  #42  
Old 02-24-2011, 08:21 AM
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Blackcat31 Blackcat31 is offline
 
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Default if you are the same unregistered poster in this thread.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
QUOTING

"close proximal supervision (a one adult to four child ratio), excellent (fully organic home made from scratch meals) nutrition, free play with an outstanding toy collection for birth to five, outdoor exercise (45 minute hike every possible day), GOOD DEEP SLEEP (2.5-3 hour afternoon nap) , discipline, and affection."

"excellent nutrition, lots of exercise, good deep sleep, RESPECT for adults, good friends, self entertainment skills, and lots of lovin."

I've read this resume so many times per day that I could quote it.
What exactly is it you want?

I get the feeling that you are waiting for everyone on here to come out and say "Yes, you are right. We should be raising these kids, teaching them life long self help skills, teaching them manners and healthy eating habits, along with all their ABC's and 1,2,3's. Make them perfect little children that know all the right things and grow up to be wonderful productive and contributing members of society...since that is, according to you, my job and what I am paid to do.....If that is the case, then please, please, please explain to me, what is the parent's job?

......apparently, nothing more than to give birth and then get the tax write off....

Geez, if I'd have know that....I would have had 15 kids and not wasted my time parenting them and making sure that I fulfilled what I mistakenly thought was my job as the parent.....my bad.
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Old 02-24-2011, 12:20 PM
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Smile Not the same person

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What exactly is it you want?

I get the feeling that you are waiting for everyone on here to come out and say "Yes, you are right. We should be raising these kids, teaching them life long self help skills, teaching them manners and healthy eating habits, along with all their ABC's and 1,2,3's. Make them perfect little children that know all the right things and grow up to be wonderful productive and contributing members of society...since that is, according to you, my job and what I am paid to do.....If that is the case, then please, please, please explain to me, what is the parent's job?

......apparently, nothing more than to give birth and then get the tax write off....

Geez, if I'd have know that....I would have had 15 kids and not wasted my time parenting them and making sure that I fulfilled what I mistakenly thought was my job as the parent.....my bad.
We are not the same "unregistered". I am the one who said I've read the resume a bazillion times, and frankly, I'm a bit tired of it. But it really has nothing to do with the theme of this thread. I'm not the "unregistered" person who created this thread. Just wanted to clear that up.
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