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Daycare Center and Family Home Forum>DCG Can't Understand Speech
midaycare 12:47 PM 01-16-2015
I have a dcg, 2.5, who is really hard to understand. She has 4 peers here who are the same age and they are all doing much better. Two of her peers receive speech services, too.

Dcg spends some time crying each day because I can't understand her.

Pull up becomes "P up". But it's not particular words or sounds; it's like this with everything. She sounds the same as she did 6 months ago, no real progress. She has an 11 year old brother at home, so she gets lots of practice.

She is very independent and let's her wants and needs be known. Is this too early for any concern?
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spinnymarie 12:54 PM 01-16-2015
Dcg spends some time crying each day because I can't understand her.


That is the point where I become concerned. I'd bring that specific point up with parents.
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midaycare 01:54 PM 01-16-2015
Originally Posted by spinnymarie:
Dcg spends some time crying each day because I can't understand her.


That is the point where I become concerned. I'd bring that specific point up with parents.
I will do that, thanks
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daycare 02:01 PM 01-16-2015
honestly I would not be concerned one bit. I have two teens and a 7 year old. My son had major speech delay being the baby of the family because everyone spoke for him. He was very hard to understand until about age 4.

I had to parent my teens to tell them to stop talking for him. The LO would point and make noises still at the age of 3 because my older two would give him anything he wanted.

Seeing that there is a huge age gap with this sibling this could very well be the case.
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Heidi 03:10 PM 01-16-2015
My own now-22 year old was the same way at 4. Luckily, he was a very tenacious fellow, and not being understood actually made his LANGUAGE grow, because he'd try 20 different ways to get you to understand him by using different words. At 4, I could understand rouglhly 70% of his words (with some negotiation), and strangers probably 20%.

Sounds like she needs to be referred to speech and language. Since several other kids are already in it, it shouldn't be a big deal to her parents if you say "several of the other kids...."

I always start those conversations with "Have you noticed...."

"Have you noticed that dcg often gets upset when you can't understand her?" Or "Have you noticed that sometimes dcg is hard to understand?" If they sigh in relief that you notice, great. Offer to make a referral.

If they look hesitant, I say something like "I'm STARTING to think maybe we should have her evaluated. I'm going to keep an eye on it for a couple weeks, can you do the same at home?"

Approach again in a week or so....

Some people can't take it all at once, so you have to baby them a little.
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Josiegirl 04:50 PM 01-16-2015
I don't think it's too early to mention it. I have a dcg who's turning 3 next week, she's had a speech therapist come to dc for a few months now to work with her. She's making *some* improvement but it's still so hard to understand her some days.
Maybe they could talk to their child's pediatrician and see what they think about a speech evaluation?
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KiddieCahoots 05:55 PM 01-16-2015
Seeing you have speech therapist that come there for 2 other children, can you talk to them about your concerns and see what they advise?
When I have EI come into the child care, they are very open to talking to me about any concerns I have with children that may need help with services.
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lindap1229 06:05 PM 01-16-2015
Originally Posted by midaycare:
I have a dcg, 2.5, who is really hard to understand.
Have they had her hearing evaluated? I have a child (now 6) who couldn't talk until she was 3. It was her hearing. She still doesn't talk quite like the other 6 year olds but she's come a long way!
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Michael 07:09 PM 01-16-2015
Originally Posted by lindap1229:
Have they had her hearing evaluated? I have a child (now 6) who couldn't talk until she was 3. It was her hearing. She still doesn't talk quite like the other 6 year olds but she's come a long way!

This what I was going to say. Start with her hearing.
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midaycare 09:07 PM 01-16-2015
Originally Posted by lindap1229:
Have they had her hearing evaluated? I have a child (now 6) who couldn't talk until she was 3. It was her hearing. She still doesn't talk quite like the other 6 year olds but she's come a long way!
Interesting. I hadn't thought of that. It seems like her hearing is okay, but with her missing so many sounds, who knows? Maybe she isn't hearing what everyone else is.
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midaycare 09:08 PM 01-16-2015
Originally Posted by KiddieCahoots:
Seeing you have speech therapist that come there for 2 other children, can you talk to them about your concerns and see what they advise?
When I have EI come into the child care, they are very open to talking to me about any concerns I have with children that may need help with services.
I like this. It can give me an idea of whether I'm overly concerned or not.
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midaycare 09:10 PM 01-16-2015
Originally Posted by daycare:
honestly I would not be concerned one bit. I have two teens and a 7 year old. My son had major speech delay being the baby of the family because everyone spoke for him. He was very hard to understand until about age 4.

I had to parent my teens to tell them to stop talking for him. The LO would point and make noises still at the age of 3 because my older two would give him anything he wanted.

Seeing that there is a huge age gap with this sibling this could very well be the case.
I do wonder what her home life is like. She has great parents, but I think she is catered to quite a bit.
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midaycare 09:11 PM 01-16-2015
Originally Posted by Heidi:
My own now-22 year old was the same way at 4. Luckily, he was a very tenacious fellow, and not being understood actually made his LANGUAGE grow, because he'd try 20 different ways to get you to understand him by using different words. At 4, I could understand rouglhly 70% of his words (with some negotiation), and strangers probably 20%.

Sounds like she needs to be referred to speech and language. Since several other kids are already in it, it shouldn't be a big deal to her parents if you say "several of the other kids...."

I always start those conversations with "Have you noticed...."

"Have you noticed that dcg often gets upset when you can't understand her?" Or "Have you noticed that sometimes dcg is hard to understand?" If they sigh in relief that you notice, great. Offer to make a referral.

If they look hesitant, I say something like "I'm STARTING to think maybe we should have her evaluated. I'm going to keep an eye on it for a couple weeks, can you do the same at home?"

Approach again in a week or so....

Some people can't take it all at once, so you have to baby them a little.
This is great language to use - thanks!
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Tags:hearing problems, speech therapist
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