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Book Club - Reviews / Suggestions What books and stories do you like best. Reviews are welcome.

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Old 12-07-2010, 08:44 PM
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Abigail Abigail is offline
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Default Shelves For Toys And Books

I would like to know about your toy shelves and book shelves. Sounds weird, lol, but I don't like our current daycare shelves for various reasons. We have two shelves in the infant area with enough toys in that area to fill one shelf nicely. Then, we have a double-sided shorter (maybe 20 inches tall) toy shelf for the 1-5 year olds and they always just seem to climb on the top of it and toys never get put away nicely because they shelves are all so low they only come up to the child's knees. The last (fourth) shelf in the daycare is actually like two standard/small book shelves like found at Target or Kmart for $20, but it's actually heavy duty shelves. This shelf--it's actually two, but they're side by side and look like one shelf--has one adjustable shelf that the kids pull out on a regular basis. So anyways, I obviously don't want the same shelves as the daycare I work at. (Sorry for the long boring description!)

What would you recommend for a group of 6 children ages newborn to age 5.......(Someone is going to build me shelves, so I want to have a better idea of size/shape)

for the height of the shelves?
whether they're two-sided or one-sided?
whether they should have an adjustable shelf option?

I will have a limited space, but I was thinking about asking for two one-sided shelves so I could use them to separate play areas or section off open areas and basically just have more options for re-arranging. I don't know how large they should be or how many shelves or how many divider sections in them. LOL. I just want something simple but nice, that will withhold years of play too!
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Old 12-07-2010, 08:57 PM
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i would always go for one sided shelves because two sided shelves just drive you nuts with things getting pushed through to the other side - unless u have it against a wall, but if u have it against a wall, it's still a one sided shelf

if you're having shelves built - think about what it would look like if you have two shelves (same size) back to back. if you had the shelf built so that both sides were open with a "wall" in between....u could use the same shelf for two different play areas by putting the end against a wall. one side could store dramatic play items and the other blocks.

if you're using a shelf for "cubbies" i'd have them mounted high up on the wall so the kids can't go and pull things down (without standing on something...which they'll do)!

Last edited by QualiTcare; 12-07-2010 at 09:00 PM.
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Old 12-08-2010, 04:10 AM
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nannyde nannyde is offline
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Originally Posted by Abigail View Post
I would like to know about your toy shelves and book shelves. Sounds weird, lol, but I don't like our current daycare shelves for various reasons. We have two shelves in the infant area with enough toys in that area to fill one shelf nicely. Then, we have a double-sided shorter (maybe 20 inches tall) toy shelf for the 1-5 year olds and they always just seem to climb on the top of it and toys never get put away nicely because they shelves are all so low they only come up to the child's knees. The last (fourth) shelf in the daycare is actually like two standard/small book shelves like found at Target or Kmart for $20, but it's actually heavy duty shelves. This shelf--it's actually two, but they're side by side and look like one shelf--has one adjustable shelf that the kids pull out on a regular basis. So anyways, I obviously don't want the same shelves as the daycare I work at. (Sorry for the long boring description!)

What would you recommend for a group of 6 children ages newborn to age 5.......(Someone is going to build me shelves, so I want to have a better idea of size/shape)

for the height of the shelves?
whether they're two-sided or one-sided?
whether they should have an adjustable shelf option?

I will have a limited space, but I was thinking about asking for two one-sided shelves so I could use them to separate play areas or section off open areas and basically just have more options for re-arranging. I don't know how large they should be or how many shelves or how many divider sections in them. LOL. I just want something simple but nice, that will withhold years of play too!
I don't allow kids access to anything in the shelves or the surface area of the shelves. They are trained from the time they are very little that the shelving and contents are by invite only. We don't allow the kids to take things out of the shelving or put thngs back in. When we are using one of the toy collections from the shelving we remove the container out into play. They are taught NOT to play with the container and not to dump the container.

I also don't allow climbing in the day care room so they of course wouldn't be allowed to climb in or on anything in the room.

I use these:

http://www.nanshouse.com/apps/photos...otoid=41430554

http://www.nanshouse.com/apps/photos...otoid=41430555

They are from Lakeshore.
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Old 12-08-2010, 05:25 AM
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And in a more child-centered approach than the one Nanny uses having materials at the child's level is a very good thing.

I have one of the "bin shelves" that you see at Target/Wal-Mart and that holds play food, doll accessories, and a few other things. It's right beside the play kitchen and is very handy. My 3 yo is very good about putting things away on her own and correctly (I'm anal about sorting stuff, lol). I also have one of the short 3-shelf bookcases from Target ($15) upstairs and 2 more downstairs--upstairs it holds things like the cash register, tea set, doctor stuff, etc, and downstairs, they hold Little People buildings. Perfect height for kids to access the materials themselves and put them away themselves, adjustable shelves but they have NEVER been pulled out by my crew, and too tall to climb on.

I have another bookshelf (happens to also have 3 shelves, none adjustable) that I use as a toy shelf--this one holds blocks, instruments, and shape toys (puzzles, shape sorters, stacking/nesting things, etc).

My books are on one of these although I see from my search that kidkraft has one that looks nicer. I searched "kids bookshelf" at Target--these sling style ones are really nice because they let the kids see the cover rather than the spine. Rain Gutter Book Shelves are also awesome, and if I ever quit rearranging my daycare (lol) I want to install some.

One big key that many people don't realize is that you need to limit the number of things on each shelf--two or three is plenty. The shelves need to not be crowded. Letting kids access things themselves, put them away themselves, is a very developmentally appropriate thing to do. You can still control what and how much they play with by rotating things on and off the shelves.

And, I'm such a heathen that I allow climbing in my daycare room. We have a Little Tikes Slide n Climb Castle (I think that's what it's called) that they just LOVE and they're always climbing into the rocking chair, and I let them stand on kid-sized chairs to look out the window. The slide is a HUGE hit especially with the crappy weather. I have a high energy group and this helps run off (climb off?) some of the energy. I've noticed a big difference in the behavior (for the better) since I brought the slide upstairs again.
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Old 12-08-2010, 05:32 AM
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I use book shelves with covered bins and baskets for toys. the covered bins hold the toys for the older children and the baskets are for the toys for the toddlers. My kids are allowed to take one basket/bin down at a time but have to put it back before they take another one. I have them grouped by age so the toddlers have their own age-appropriate shelf that they can pick from, same with the older children.
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Old 12-08-2010, 05:44 AM
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I just wanted to add that I've started doing what Nan does. The invite only. In a shelf similar to hers. All the ever did was dump them all out. I didn't think they could be taught - but sure enough they can..LOL
Mine is in my kitchen.. which helps. And in it I have play dough, crayons, markers, kid scissors, glue sticks, paper, old magazines, potato head pieces and army guys.

I know the potato head pieces and the army guys seem out of place - but those were two toys that were NEVEr played with and yet always dumped. So I invite them to the kitchen table with a bucket and they play for a long time. Then if they want something else they have to clean up the bucket they have now. It is working for my 18 month old (shock!!!).

The toys in the play room are still getting dumped all over - and I'm working on it. But some of them I don't want to have "invite only" like all the kitchen food? I find it EVERYWHERE in my house - but I want the kitchen play area to be always accessable. And my house is too small to really create a full on kitchen area where the kitchen toys HAVE to stay in the kitchen area.

Some other things that are now invite only are puzzles, duplo blocks, hard colored blocks and Lincoln logs.

It is a work in progress.

Books is a sore subject My little guys just want to rip the spines. I'll see them sitting there reading.. I walk away and come back and they are peeling at them. The book gets taken away - they get a TO. But they just all do it again (two kids in particular)
I've removed all of my sentimental books - the ones that I can't bare to have ruined. The only ones they have free range on is the board books (which they still peel ) and the rubber/plastic type books. All others are by permission only and are up high.
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Old 12-08-2010, 07:18 AM
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If you are having someone make shelves for you, I would base the design off of what type of containers you plan on using to store your toys. At one time I had one of those shelves that the buckets kind of sat in on the slanted shelves. Those did not work out for me! I now use the buckets on the standard 2 shelf units that can be purchased at the big box stores. I have two of them. Books go on the bottom shelf, and the other two shelves have buckets on them of which I rotate toys. I also put puzzles, playdough or coloring items on the top of the shelf, that also gets rotated. One shelf is in our front closet where I also store nap mats and toys get switched between it and the other shelf, the other shelf is out and accesible at all times, though they do need to ask to use items on the top shelf. I definately have dumping going on with the available buckets but it is with the 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 age range, and frankly I think that is a developmental stage that while annoying, is just what they do. I have never had anyone try to climb the shelves, but have had them try to climb the kitchen! Books here are turned into laptaops. They take one for the monitor and one for the keyboard and set them up and type on them. Drives me batty, as I think books are not toys, but hey, they are using their imaginations! I think if you only have 6 kids, I wouldn't worry about having a lot of shelves and having lots of toys available. I think it just makes more work for constantly cleaning up, and I don't think kids get as engaged because there is just to much stuff. I have 4 large buckets that contain dolls, lego's, foam blocks, and teddy bears, that I rotate out as well. Long story short, I would strongly consider what type of storage buckets you want to utilize and build your shelves from there!
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Old 12-08-2010, 07:21 AM
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Love the Rain Gutter Bookshelf idea!!!! I think i may install these in my downstairs stairwell!! Very cute idea, thanks for posting the link!
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Old 12-08-2010, 07:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverSabre25 View Post
And in a more child-centered approach than the one Nanny uses having materials at the child's level is a very good thing.

I have one of the "bin shelves" that you see at Target/Wal-Mart and that holds play food, doll accessories, and a few other things. It's right beside the play kitchen and is very handy. My 3 yo is very good about putting things away on her own and correctly (I'm anal about sorting stuff, lol). I also have one of the short 3-shelf bookcases from Target ($15) upstairs and 2 more downstairs--upstairs it holds things like the cash register, tea set, doctor stuff, etc, and downstairs, they hold Little People buildings. Perfect height for kids to access the materials themselves and put them away themselves, adjustable shelves but they have NEVER been pulled out by my crew, and too tall to climb on.

I have another bookshelf (happens to also have 3 shelves, none adjustable) that I use as a toy shelf--this one holds blocks, instruments, and shape toys (puzzles, shape sorters, stacking/nesting things, etc).

My books are on one of these although I see from my search that kidkraft has one that looks nicer. I searched "kids bookshelf" at Target--these sling style ones are really nice because they let the kids see the cover rather than the spine. Rain Gutter Book Shelves are also awesome, and if I ever quit rearranging my daycare (lol) I want to install some.

One big key that many people don't realize is that you need to limit the number of things on each shelf--two or three is plenty. The shelves need to not be crowded. Letting kids access things themselves, put them away themselves, is a very developmentally appropriate thing to do. You can still control what and how much they play with by rotating things on and off the shelves.

And, I'm such a heathen that I allow climbing in my daycare room. We have a Little Tikes Slide n Climb Castle (I think that's what it's called) that they just LOVE and they're always climbing into the rocking chair, and I let them stand on kid-sized chairs to look out the window. The slide is a HUGE hit especially with the crappy weather. I have a high energy group and this helps run off (climb off?) some of the energy. I've noticed a big difference in the behavior (for the better) since I brought the slide upstairs again.
And in a more child-centered approach than the one Nanny uses having materials at the child's level is a very good thing.

Ummm have you seen my TWO playrooms? The children have THOUSANDS of dollars worth of toys available at their level. What could you mean by this?

And, I'm such a heathen that I allow climbing in my daycare room. And that is awesome. Who would think you were a heathen? What do you mean by that? If climbing indoors works for you then of course you should offer that.
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Old 12-08-2010, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by WyoDaycareMom View Post
If you are having someone make shelves for you, I would base the design off of what type of containers you plan on using to store your toys. At one time I had one of those shelves that the buckets kind of sat in on the slanted shelves. Those did not work out for me! I now use the buckets on the standard 2 shelf units that can be purchased at the big box stores. I have two of them. Books go on the bottom shelf, and the other two shelves have buckets on them of which I rotate toys. I also put puzzles, playdough or coloring items on the top of the shelf, that also gets rotated. One shelf is in our front closet where I also store nap mats and toys get switched between it and the other shelf, the other shelf is out and accesible at all times, though they do need to ask to use items on the top shelf. I definately have dumping going on with the available buckets but it is with the 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 age range, and frankly I think that is a developmental stage that while annoying, is just what they do. I have never had anyone try to climb the shelves, but have had them try to climb the kitchen! Books here are turned into laptaops. They take one for the monitor and one for the keyboard and set them up and type on them. Drives me batty, as I think books are not toys, but hey, they are using their imaginations! I think if you only have 6 kids, I wouldn't worry about having a lot of shelves and having lots of toys available. I think it just makes more work for constantly cleaning up, and I don't think kids get as engaged because there is just to much stuff. I have 4 large buckets that contain dolls, lego's, foam blocks, and teddy bears, that I rotate out as well. Long story short, I would strongly consider what type of storage buckets you want to utilize and build your shelves from there!
I actually purchased some white buckets from Fleet Farm that I want to use. I was determined to stick to the second-smallest size from their collection of five buckets, but then realized that I could use the smallest size bucket when I purchased Black Friday Lego Duplos. They only filled up half the bucket! I'm at a toss up between returning what I got and buying the smallest sized bucket. I only plan on having 4-8 buckets out at a time, guessing I could have four on a shelf. I want to have larger blocks on the bottom shelves because babies can play with those too.

Here is a book shelf I am considering to have built...much cheaper too! This has a dry erase back to it, but I was thinking about either a magnetic back if I need to use the bookshelf as a section divider or just have the back be plain wood to have it against the wall. http://www.kaplanco.com/store/trans/...12|0&PID=47147

For toy shelves. I was thinking of something more along these lines......I don't really want something just for a bunch of bins. I don't want it to feel like a manipulatives classroom. This one is a 30 inch tall shelf similiar to our current daycare, but the kids currently climb and stand on this one at work (except this is single and the one at work is a double, so it's wider and probably more inviting to stand on) http://www.kaplanco.com/store/trans/...10|0&PID=48044
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Old 12-08-2010, 02:40 PM
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if you're using a shelf for "cubbies" i'd have them mounted high up on the wall so the kids can't go and pull things down (without standing on something...which they'll do)!
i'm pretty sure nannyde was responding to this. i'm not sure why bc it has nothing to do with the price of rice in china, or shelves

in my experience, toddlers like to go to their own cubbies where their own belongings are and pull things out. if you mount them up high, they can't - but they'll still try - that's all i was saying. as debated in the past, just because kids try something doesn't mean you ALLOW it - it doesn't stop them from trying.
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Old 12-08-2010, 03:02 PM
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I just have 2 of these shelves from Target in my playroom with a few toys and containers. I just use the .99 containers/lids from walmart and add a picture to the container of the toy inside.

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Old 12-08-2010, 03:05 PM
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And in a more child-centered approach than the one Nanny uses having materials at the child's level is a very good thing.

And, I'm such a heathen that I allow climbing in my daycare room.
And this is what I mean by random, snarky comments.

I'm genuinely curious...

Did you not think that your post was critical or do you feel justified in being critical because you don't agree?
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Old 12-08-2010, 03:10 PM
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I have cubbies from IKEA, the kids are allowed to take the toys out, but they are not allowed to take the cloth cubbie deals out of the the shelf. I've had them for a year or so and haven't had any problem teaching them to take the toy out, but leave the cubby in.

I used to have a climber, I used to but it took up a lot of space, so no climbing here either. I haven't had any trouble with them trying to climb on top of the cubbies, but I don't have any furniture near the shelf and since they can't take out the cubbies, climbing up it would be tough.

I have one in the entry way for shoes, hats, gloves...I love them!
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Old 12-08-2010, 05:03 PM
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Originally Posted by nannyde View Post
And in a more child-centered approach than the one Nanny uses having materials at the child's level is a very good thing.

Ummm have you seen my TWO playrooms? The children have THOUSANDS of dollars worth of toys available at their level. What could you mean by this?

And, I'm such a heathen that I allow climbing in my daycare room. And that is awesome. Who would think you were a heathen? What do you mean by that? If climbing indoors works for you then of course you should offer that.
Perhaps I misunderstood your post, and if so, I'm sorry. From your comments above on the subject of shelves, it sounds as though you do not allow children access to toys on their own, rather they have to ask for everything that they want. I was merely commenting that although that approach works for you, it would not fly in a child-centered environment. If I misunderstood, again, my apologies.

The climbing comment was not intentionally directed at you; allowing climbing in the house is something that's been "frowned upon" so-to-speak by many in this community in many other contexts/threads, and so it just happened to slip out.
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Old 12-08-2010, 05:12 PM
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And this is what I mean by random, snarky comments.

I'm genuinely curious...

Did you not think that your post was critical or do you feel justified in being critical because you don't agree?
I responded to Nannyde just now. I apologize to nanny, and anyone I offended...I don't usually let comments like that slip out, and I usually ignore people I don't agree with. I hate confrontation. My filter must be set to low today or something though, because I let that get by me. Giving what I'm dealing with atm, no one can really blame me.

I have to say that I'm NOT the one usually embroiled in debates with Nanny, so I'm amused that this comment is getting picked on. I suppose it's just the most recent.

Yes, it was critical. Yes it was snarky. No, it wasn't entirely random. I don't know whether I feel justified in it...most likely, no, because as I said I hate confrontation. It's just what I said. I usually keep those comments to myself since arguing via message board is silly. This one slipped out. My apologies.
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Old 12-08-2010, 06:50 PM
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I just have 2 of these shelves from Target in my playroom with a few toys and containers. I just use the .99 containers/lids from walmart and add a picture to the container of the toy inside.

I absolutely love your picture. Did you cover cork board with fabric and hang it on the wall and use the same fabric to cover the cardboard or wood piece behind the shelf? This is so cute!

I know this would be an option to start out before I have custom built shelves. Thank you for sharing your photo!
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Old 12-09-2010, 03:19 AM
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nannyde nannyde is offline
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Perhaps I misunderstood your post, and if so, I'm sorry. From your comments above on the subject of shelves, it sounds as though you do not allow children access to toys on their own, rather they have to ask for everything that they want. I was merely commenting that although that approach works for you, it would not fly in a child-centered environment. If I misunderstood, again, my apologies.
No problem.
My comment was:

I don't allow kids access to anything in the shelves or the surface area of the shelves.

This means that the kids can't just get into our 24 bins in the shelving units I have without invitation and they can't use the top of the shelving or the shelves themselves to play on.

When we have something we are going to have them do that is housed in the bins in the shelving we bring that one bin out and put it on the floor. They are not allowed to use the container in their play.... just the contents of the cubbie. Once they have removed (one by one... no dumping) the contents of the bin we remove the bin and put it back. When it's time to clean up the bin comes back out... is put on the floor... they refill it and WE put it back. The only exception to that is when we have our "pack leader" assist.

They are trained as soon as they can walk to leave the shelving units alone. We house a number of our collections in there and the bins themselves were pretty pricey. The bins are also hard plastic so they can be broken or cracked posing a safety issue for the kids if they are played with and a big replacement fee to replace as they are currently only sold in packs of twelve.

A number of the collections in the bins are also for specific age ranges. We want to make sure that whatever is being played with matches the children we are getting them out for.

Kids are attracted to anything that they can play with standing up. They have a tendency to go for the easiest thing to get to with as little motion as they can do. My kids are much more interested in the containers, the shelving, and the "table top" of the shelving than they are the collections.

I don't have "table top" play for general free play. I don't have free access tables in my rooms. I have two pieces of equipment that have small (one square foot max. flat area that are only used for those particular toys... toy tool bench and Melissa and Doug piece of crap kitchen)

I teach them a method of playing on the floor where the floor is their table. We have carpeting that allows building directly on it so we want their play to be at floor level. We do use a large grid duplo table for duplo play because they are too light weighted to build off the floor. We only allow duplos on that table and it is not a flat surface (grids are bumpy)

The beauty of the "floor is your table" play is that the kids get up and down off the floor hundreds of times in a normal play time. This is an amazing way to get a lot of great exercise when they play. When what they are doing is on the floor they don't sit at the toy for long... they get up... bend over... get on their knees... lean to one side... lean to the other... etc.

When you have shelving available to them.. in my experience... they first want to "tear up" or "take down" anything on the shelving. We hear this OVER AND OVER year after year from frustrated providers who complain that they are just dumping out the stuff, cluttering the floor, and then a lot of adult involvement to get it put back. Often the answer is that just a little is put on the shelf at a time.

When you do these methods the kids then use the shelving as their table or their climber. They use any bins to turn over and stand on. They want to put the bins in and out over and over and use the bins to haord the toys they don't want the others to have.

They also use the top of the shelving and play "over their heads" on the surface and use the height of the surface to drop things down.

I've cared for over a hundred kids in my career and I know for sure that dumping, tearing up, tearing down, playing with bins and containers by pulling them out and putting them back in are skill sets that are VERY easily learned and don't need daily practice. Most infants figure dumping out and are master dumpers by age one. Most kids learn shortly after they start walking how to tear down a shelf of toys. They can tear up a book during the first year. By the mid first year they can pull bins out of the cabinets with ease. By the end of the first year they can put it back.

These skill sets are REALLY low level skills that nearly every very young baby and new toddler can do and do SUPER well. I don't think they need practice daily with dumping, tearing down, tearing apart, disasembling, etc. I'm confident by watching my crew play year after year that they GET IT and are actually GIFTED in it at a very young age.


So our play rules don't include fostering these already easy and well practiced skills. Now we do have a few toys for the infants like a big cloth block with a velcroed top that has three shapes that you can unlatch the lid, dump out the three soft blocks, and put them back thru their shape slot. I don't mind having small numbered items like that that the babies can play with. I just don't have larged number dumping toys. All of these kids here at my house now are over 18 months and every one of them could go down and completely dump out my entire 24 shelves in less than a few minutes. The kids two and up could replace the empty bins into the shelving within a minute or two. They could turn over all of our bins. They could tear up all of our books.

They already have the skill set for these developmental tasks so I'm confident they are coming along well. I keep our play rules to the next level which is focusing on the CONTENTS of the containers... removing the contents one by one... playing with them on the floor... returning the contents into the contaners and then us returning the container to the shelving.

THAT'S the skill set I'm after. That's what my kids do with shelved toys. Because there are so many different containers with so many little collections they have something new and different all the time. We try to mix and match what they are doing so by the end of the month they have had a shot at all of the different toys.


I do allow the "pack leader" of my group (the eldest child who was raised here) to choose the bin of the day quite a bit. She is also allowed to remove and return the bins with our direction. It's a "special" for the eldest in the group. She knows where everything is at a glance so it helps me to pick out the collections and she (being raised here) is very careful with the bins and is capable (with supervision and direction) of getting them out for whoever is using them. She doesn't have free reign to them but she does like the honor of being the bin girl.

We have her apprentice (2nd eldest pack leader in training) do it now and then because eventually she will become the pack leader so she is practicing 'helping" when the leader isn't here.

So by assigning rules and "special" to it we make the bins and shelving workable and long lasting. The children VALUE the toys in the bins. We make the contents of the containers the most important aspect of them and the ability to get them in and out something that's only done with direction, supervision, and as a privledge that is earned after four/five years here.

These are one of the number of "rules of play" we use to keep everything running smoothly and everyone calm and playing appropriately with the stuff. They are all played out by nap time and take a good long deep afternoon nap. They are also PHENOMENAL toy players and amazing builders. They are sweet to each other and don't fight at all. This one baisc foundational play way along with our other rules of play keep everything running smoothly and everybody happy. It involves very little adult involvement other than visual supervision which we are doing anyway
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Old 12-09-2010, 05:25 AM
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SunflowerMama SunflowerMama is offline
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Originally Posted by Abigail View Post
I absolutely love your picture. Did you cover cork board with fabric and hang it on the wall and use the same fabric to cover the cardboard or wood piece behind the shelf? This is so cute!

I know this would be an option to start out before I have custom built shelves. Thank you for sharing your photo!
I had 2 pieces of canvas (but cork board would be a great option too!) so I just wrapped those in the fabric and then put it on the back of the bookcase to match. I think it was someone on here that gave me the idea. So much cuter than a boring white shelf.
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Old 12-09-2010, 06:21 AM
jen jen is offline
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Originally Posted by SilverSabre25 View Post
I responded to Nannyde just now. I apologize to nanny, and anyone I offended...I don't usually let comments like that slip out, and I usually ignore people I don't agree with. I hate confrontation. My filter must be set to low today or something though, because I let that get by me. Giving what I'm dealing with atm, no one can really blame me.

I have to say that I'm NOT the one usually embroiled in debates with Nanny, so I'm amused that this comment is getting picked on. I suppose it's just the most recent.

Yes, it was critical. Yes it was snarky. No, it wasn't entirely random. I don't know whether I feel justified in it...most likely, no, because as I said I hate confrontation. It's just what I said. I usually keep those comments to myself since arguing via message board is silly. This one slipped out. My apologies.
Your right, I did just pick your comment because it was the most recent. It honestly was meant to attack you personally. I don't think of you as someone who is reguarly unprofessional.

I feel really frustrated when we as providers start ripping on one another for differences in our philosophies, provided of course the philosophy isn't dangerous or demeaning to children.

I understand you have a lot on your plate at the moment and I am sorry if my comment made you uncomfortable.
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