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Old 07-11-2011, 02:30 PM
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Default What Toys To Provide Aggressive 2 yo In "Isolation"?

I have a 2 yo boy who has been getting more and more agressive lately--biting, hitting, throwing hard toys at other people's heads...*sigh*

So starting tomorrow I will have a pack n play set up in the playroom for him to be in isolation for five or ten minutes EVERY time he does something agressive. I need suggestions for soft toys to put in the pack n play with him, things that will not hurt anyone else if thrown. I'm struggling with it because most of the soft things are baby toys...

(p.s. please no debates about terminating, etc...I'm in communication with his mom about the situation, she agrees with this plan, and is going to talk to his doc about a hearing check and an eval with a speech therapist for possible issues there, so we are looking into the root of the problem)
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Old 07-11-2011, 02:43 PM
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Soft blocks, child fabric books, stuffed animals.

If he chucks those, he doesn't need toys while in isolation.
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Old 07-11-2011, 02:55 PM
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IMHO, if he is only going to be in there for a couple minutes (that is all I am allowed to do per regulation , one minute per year of age) then no toys would be required.

My fear is that by his getting toys while he is "losing privileges" it may draw the problem out longer.

He gets his own space, own toys AND your attention by acting out... YKWIM?

I have also tried this technique, at a parent request, with a DCK 2 years of age.

My DCK simply rocked it back and forth to knock it over, climbed right back out or tried to bite/tear the mesh and destroy the pack-n-play.

Do you have a solid high chair to try instead? It may be less of a financial risk.

Just a suggestion from experience.
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:15 PM
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soft Nerf balls
only other suggestion I can think of.

you are right most soft toys are baby toys if all else fails put those in there at least it will be something.
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:17 PM
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I also agree that if the child throws those toys then he does not need any toys at least for the remainder of that isolation/time out period. It makes for a great natural consequence I am big on natural consequences.
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:27 PM
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Are you willing to buy or make things?

http://kindredspiritmommy.com/buckle...-for-toddlers/

I know they must sell these, but if you have a craft store nearby, you could sew some buckles on anything, or just make a fabric shaped toy and sew buckles onto that. My two year olds would buckle and unbuckle all the infant seats all day long. It drives me batty, but I bet he'd sit down and be quiet for a while if he had one of these.

Those giant baby pop beads. I know they are for babies, but two year olds do like them, and they are light weight and soft.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/day...X7TMQG585VEKAQ

Last edited by Michael; 07-11-2011 at 03:38 PM.
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:33 PM
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Cut a pool noodle into short pieces for blocks. But, the two year olds tend to eat those.

Dolls

Target has some REALLY cool rubber blocks in their specialty toy area. I think the toy line is called B. (formerly known as Parents) They aren't baby toys, but they aren't really cheap either. So, you'd only want to give those to him if you really like him. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/day...X7TMQG585VEKAQ


Last edited by Michael; 07-11-2011 at 03:38 PM.
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:50 PM
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Personally I'd strap him in a high chair and turn him away from everyone for 2 minutes every single time. I wouldn't go longer unless he was throwing a huge fit in the chair, then I would wait for him to calm down before letting him out. I also would give him nothing except the tray if he was able to undo the buckles.
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Old 07-11-2011, 03:58 PM
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I don't give toys during isolation either.
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Old 07-11-2011, 06:11 PM
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Personally I would not give him any toys at all while he is being punnished. That's like a reward. What if it is his goal to have that special attention and he gets a toy too... I would sit him in isolation alone with nothing. It's not like u are hurting him, u are teaching him. Besides it's not going to be very long. Let him actually sit there and think about why he is there not pass the time by playing with a special toy. JMHO
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Old 07-11-2011, 06:23 PM
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(p.s. please no debates about terminating, etc...I'm in communication with his mom about the situation, she agrees with this plan, and is going to talk to his doc about a hearing check and an eval with a speech therapist for possible issues there, so we are looking into the root of the problem)[/quote]

I think it is great that you are willing and able to work with a parent willing and able to work with you. It is possible the child is doing it in hopes of staying home with mom. Even-though at that age he can not fully understand that motivation or explain it to anyone as the reason.
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Old 07-11-2011, 06:55 PM
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Thanks for the input and the toy suggestions, guys.

I'm not licensed (legally, just fyi) and don't have regs to deal with. We've been dealing with this for awhile now in one form or another; it's gradually gotten worse and worse though. Two minute time outs have not worked, explaining that he's hurting people and it's not okay hasn't worked, shadowing hasn't worked. I'm up to "pack n play for 5 to 10 minutes at a time" to keep the other kids safe.

At this point, I'm honestly not sure if perhaps his speech/other delays are affecting his capability to truly comprehend both the crime and the punishment. I do not feel that it would be at ALL appropriate to leave him with NOTHING for what will surely end up a significant portion of the day.

I don't think I have a highchair that would hold him...what are the weight limits on those? I didn't use one very long with DD so I have no clue.

His mom is on board and is getting the evaluations he needs. She's also going to talk to his dad and try to find out what things are like when he's with his father.
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Old 07-11-2011, 07:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverSabre25 View Post
Thanks for the input and the toy suggestions, guys.

I'm not licensed (legally, just fyi) and don't have regs to deal with. We've been dealing with this for awhile now in one form or another; it's gradually gotten worse and worse though. Two minute time outs have not worked, explaining that he's hurting people and it's not okay hasn't worked, shadowing hasn't worked. I'm up to "pack n play for 5 to 10 minutes at a time" to keep the other kids safe.

At this point, I'm honestly not sure if perhaps his speech/other delays are affecting his capability to truly comprehend both the crime and the punishment. I do not feel that it would be at ALL appropriate to leave him with NOTHING for what will surely end up a significant portion of the day.

I don't think I have a highchair that would hold him...what are the weight limits on those? I didn't use one very long with DD so I have no clue.

His mom is on board and is getting the evaluations he needs. She's also going to talk to his dad and try to find out what things are like when he's with his father.
Wow that much? Ok I was thinking 5 mins here and there. I don't know what to suggest then. Perhaps those soft cloth books? Good luck with this. I hope he straightens out for u.
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Old 07-11-2011, 07:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by youretooloud View Post
Cut a pool noodle into short pieces for blocks. But, the two year olds tend to eat those.

Dolls

Target has some REALLY cool rubber blocks in their specialty toy area. I think the toy line is called B. (formerly known as Parents) They aren't baby toys, but they aren't really cheap either. So, you'd only want to give those to him if you really like him. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/day...X7TMQG585VEKAQ

I had something like those when I was a kid. I haven't seen them in ages! Good idea!
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Old 07-11-2011, 07:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PitterPatter View Post
Wow that much? Ok I was thinking 5 mins here and there. I don't know what to suggest then. Perhaps those soft cloth books? Good luck with this. I hope he straightens out for u.
It depends...a significant portion of his awake time here, anyway. Even ten minutes is too much if he's truly not comprehending why he's there and why his actions aren't acceptable. He's here from 9:30 until about 4 and sleeps for 2 to 2.5 hours, and we're outside for at least one hour (where the problems are still present, just in smaller form because there are fewer projectiles available). So, if I have to put him in there just three times because of throwing or hitting, it's a pretty good chunk of time when he doesn't seem to understand.
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Old 07-11-2011, 07:53 PM
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Default he is ready for throwing practice

Laundry basket and balled socks.Clap every time he gets it in.
Find ways to praise him every second he is doing what you want. Give him something you want him to do every minute.

Safety First booster with tray and pudding finger paint on the tray, paper taped down, tiny amounts of paint.

Foam alphabet tiles, they are a giant puzzle, offer letter familiarity, and are slow flying.
Cardboard house. Maybe he is overwhelmed and needs a quiet place.

Not sure how many kids you have, but when my kiddo was sick and eventually needed adenoid surgery - which cleared his ears and resolved his speech issues, even though he passed three hearing tests - he was a screamer, thrower, non-eating fussy kid. It was a one on one necessity. It took well over a year to get the surgery.

Songs with movements. Do them in groups. Even if he is not verbal.

Smile a lot. Your disapproval is only meaningful if it is rare.

You are not licensed. Make a movie corner and play something mellow and quiet ALL The TIME.

Give him lots of chances to be expressive, coloring, playdough, banging golf tees into styrofoam, bubbles....

If he's got anger - teach him to say I am mad, tell you why and take deep breaths and work on it together.
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