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  #1  
Old 09-13-2013, 07:30 PM
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Default New DCPs Asking When I'm Going To Stop Updating My Policies???

They put a deposit down 9 months ago and haven't even started yet. I've sent update policies twice in the 9 months. Now I'm being asked when will it be a final copy because I've made soooo many changes since they signed on.

I basically responded with "never". As my program, business and regulations change so will my policies. Also when they signed on I'd not even opened full time yet, so I've come across several issues with parents and had to add policies to deal with scenarios that have come up

How do you handle a question like this?
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  #2  
Old 09-13-2013, 08:14 PM
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I'd handle about the way you did... "never". When I open my handbook will have a clause in it stating that I can change policies whenever I feel theres a need to. I do plan on giving a couple or more weeks notice(when possible) from the time I notify parents of the change until it takes effect, but for the reasons you stated above, it will happen from time to time
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Old 09-13-2013, 08:23 PM
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"never"
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  #4  
Old 09-13-2013, 09:25 PM
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One of my DCMs was chatting w/ me a few weeks ago and mentioned that her husband saw one of my "policy updates" that I sent home about wearing appropriate shoes (no flip flops) on field trip days and wearing shorts or bloomers under dresses and skirts..

He asked her "why is she sending this, this is all common sense stuff. Who would send their kid in flip flops when they are going hiking? "

She said she just had to smile at him and say "Yes, she had to send it, some parents don't have any common sense"

We have to change our policies as things come up. I never would have assumed I would have to tell a parent that flip flops are inappropriate for hiking or that even after I told them they would still send them in flip flops on field trips and I would have to make closed shoes mandatory. There will always be stuff that comes up.
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Old 09-13-2013, 09:41 PM
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Never! At some point it may be longer than the dictionary. When will parents not need "common sense" written out?
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Old 09-13-2013, 09:45 PM
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I keep a notebook of everything I need to add to my updated contract. I was under the impression you could only update your contract when the contract is up for renewal. Depending on the provider, at the beginning of the year or after the family has been in your daycare for 1 year. Am I wrong???? If I am wrong that would be great because I have 9 months of issues to add to my policies/contract.
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Old 09-14-2013, 02:38 AM
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You can change it as much as you need to.

That said, I am not that concerned about my contract. It is very basic and is only two pages. I only recall changing it if my fees go up (that is a separate fee schedule though) and also changed it once to add a 'hurricane prep day'. I had people wanting to bring their children to me so they could prepare their homes and I was stuck trying to do mine with their children here. Luckily my adult daughter and son came over to help. Their jobs let them off early....

I may have made 2 or 3 changes over 18 years or so.

My reasoning is that for things that should be common sense, like someone said not wearing flip flops on a hike, I just tell the parent. I don't know why all that little stuff has to be written down. If a parent were to ever tell me (which they never have that I recall) "Well not wearing flip flops on a hike is not in your contract" first I'd look at them like they had two heads and second I'd say "Why would I need to put it in there? Wouldn't it be obvious?" Then I'd let them squirm to come up with an answer and bring me the shoes. I also have spare clothes/shoes just in case. No use ruining our day because someone refused to bring the right clothing. I just don't sweat it.

That said, I have had parents from time to time who forgot things like the shoes. I reminded them a lot and I usually did get them on time. If I knew they were doing it on purpose then I'd just say keep them home because they don't have what they need to participate after being reminded repeatedly. I also tell them in person and put a note in their bag. No emails or texts. I have never done emails/texts except for one this year to send her pictures of her child when I get a cute one. We talk or call each other.

I think I would just love for one of them to say "Well it wasn't in your contract." I wouldn't take people or keep people long who had that attitude anyway. I can't recall anyone ever saying that to me about anything.

I just refuse to sweat the small stuff. It usually is only one who has that problem. I just address whatever it is with them. No need to give everyone else a 20 page handbook that they're not going to read anyway with every possible thing that could ever go wrong ever.

Just my two cents.

Laurel

Edited to add: I guess I should add that I don't require a two week notice for them to leave (although I request as much notice as possible) and no money is involved. They can leave anytime they want and I can terminate any time I want. So maybe that is why I don't feel the need to defend my contract. They can either follow the rules or leave. I also don't make a million rules because then they'd want to leave and I don't want that. It is just a common sense thing to me. I make a few simple but important rules and if they can't follow them then bye bye. No one has ever left because they were upset and I've never had to term anyone. (Should have once or twice but didn't)
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  #8  
Old 09-14-2013, 08:01 AM
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Originally Posted by lovemylife View Post
I keep a notebook of everything I need to add to my updated contract. I was under the impression you could only update your contract when the contract is up for renewal. Depending on the provider, at the beginning of the year or after the family has been in your daycare for 1 year. Am I wrong???? If I am wrong that would be great because I have 9 months of issues to add to my policies/contract.
its your business. you can do whatever you want. go ahead and update now! most people update once a year and combine that with any rate increases but there is not some set of rules you have to follow about updates. thats the glory of being self employed.
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  #9  
Old 09-14-2013, 08:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Laurel View Post
You can change it as much as you need to.

That said, I am not that concerned about my contract. It is very basic and is only two pages. I only recall changing it if my fees go up (that is a separate fee schedule though) and also changed it once to add a 'hurricane prep day'. I had people wanting to bring their children to me so they could prepare their homes and I was stuck trying to do mine with their children here. Luckily my adult daughter and son came over to help. Their jobs let them off early....

I may have made 2 or 3 changes over 18 years or so.

My reasoning is that for things that should be common sense, like someone said not wearing flip flops on a hike, I just tell the parent. I don't know why all that little stuff has to be written down. If a parent were to ever tell me (which they never have that I recall) "Well not wearing flip flops on a hike is not in your contract" first I'd look at them like they had two heads and second I'd say "Why would I need to put it in there? Wouldn't it be obvious?" Then I'd let them squirm to come up with an answer and bring me the shoes. I also have spare clothes/shoes just in case. No use ruining our day because someone refused to bring the right clothing. I just don't sweat it.

That said, I have had parents from time to time who forgot things like the shoes. I reminded them a lot and I usually did get them on time. If I knew they were doing it on purpose then I'd just say keep them home because they don't have what they need to participate after being reminded repeatedly. I also tell them in person and put a note in their bag. No emails or texts. I have never done emails/texts except for one this year to send her pictures of her child when I get a cute one. We talk or call each other.

I think I would just love for one of them to say "Well it wasn't in your contract." I wouldn't take people or keep people long who had that attitude anyway. I can't recall anyone ever saying that to me about anything.

I just refuse to sweat the small stuff. It usually is only one who has that problem. I just address whatever it is with them. No need to give everyone else a 20 page handbook that they're not going to read anyway with every possible thing that could ever go wrong ever.

Just my two cents.

Laurel

Edited to add: I guess I should add that I don't require a two week notice for them to leave (although I request as much notice as possible) and no money is involved. They can leave anytime they want and I can terminate any time I want. So maybe that is why I don't feel the need to defend my contract. They can either follow the rules or leave. I also don't make a million rules because then they'd want to leave and I don't want that. It is just a common sense thing to me. I make a few simple but important rules and if they can't follow them then bye bye. No one has ever left because they were upset and I've never had to term anyone. (Should have once or twice but didn't)
I am getting more towards how you run things. I will straight out say anything that needs to be said to a parent and preferably in a way that makes them NOT want to make that same mistake again. This is regarding "small stuff" like inappropriate clothing and what not. I do not have the time or resources to waste in printing out lengthy contracts and parent handbooks. That said, I have no problem addressing directly to the parents but a lot of providers, especially new ones, gain a lot of confidence in writing it all out and using that as a resource when they feel they might cave to a demanding or aggressive parent. I certainly would never cave but this is 6 years in the making. and I also dont have a large group. I can see how a thorough contract would be more than helpful the larger the group you have.
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  #10  
Old 09-14-2013, 09:18 AM
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  #11  
Old 09-14-2013, 09:22 AM
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You should do another update today and call it "Policy Update: Daycare Provider can and will update the daycare policy whenever she wants because it's her daycare & she can do what she waaaaants" lol
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  #12  
Old 09-14-2013, 09:30 AM
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You should do another update today and call it "Policy Update: Daycare Provider can and will update the daycare policy whenever she wants because it's her daycare & she can do what she waaaaants" lol
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  #13  
Old 09-14-2013, 09:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
They put a deposit down 9 months ago and haven't even started yet. I've sent update policies twice in the 9 months. Now I'm being asked when will it be a final copy because I've made soooo many changes since they signed on.

I basically responded with "never". As my program, business and regulations change so will my policies. Also when they signed on I'd not even opened full time yet, so I've come across several issues with parents and had to add policies to deal with scenarios that have come up

How do you handle a question like this?
. I think that was the perfect answer.

I haven't even started my daycare yet but I have been working on my policies for over a year (it's at about 14 pages now) and even though I believe I have covered most of the basics I know I will never fully be done updating it.

They don't understand that this business is your "baby" and that you want to make sure that it is the best business you can make it and that the contract/ policies are as clear as possible to avoid misunderstandings in the future. They also don't understand that there are some scenarios you can't predict that cause conflict and that cause you to change your policies to avoid further conflicts.

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Originally Posted by MamaBear View Post
You should do another update today and call it "Policy Update: Daycare Provider can and will update the daycare policy whenever she wants because it's her daycare & she can do what she waaaaants" lol
I also have that in my contract that policies are subject to change at any time with as much notice as possible, but that in most cases I will try to give two weeks notice before enforcing it, unless it is an immediate policy that affects the health and safety of the children, my family/pets, my staff, or myself.
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  #14  
Old 09-14-2013, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Laurel View Post
You can change it as much as you need to.

That said, I am not that concerned about my contract. It is very basic and is only two pages. I only recall changing it if my fees go up (that is a separate fee schedule though) and also changed it once to add a 'hurricane prep day'. I had people wanting to bring their children to me so they could prepare their homes and I was stuck trying to do mine with their children here. Luckily my adult daughter and son came over to help. Their jobs let them off early....

I may have made 2 or 3 changes over 18 years or so.

My reasoning is that for things that should be common sense, like someone said not wearing flip flops on a hike, I just tell the parent. I don't know why all that little stuff has to be written down. If a parent were to ever tell me (which they never have that I recall) "Well not wearing flip flops on a hike is not in your contract" first I'd look at them like they had two heads and second I'd say "Why would I need to put it in there? Wouldn't it be obvious?" Then I'd let them squirm to come up with an answer and bring me the shoes. I also have spare clothes/shoes just in case. No use ruining our day because someone refused to bring the right clothing. I just don't sweat it.

That said, I have had parents from time to time who forgot things like the shoes. I reminded them a lot and I usually did get them on time. If I knew they were doing it on purpose then I'd just say keep them home because they don't have what they need to participate after being reminded repeatedly. I also tell them in person and put a note in their bag. No emails or texts. I have never done emails/texts except for one this year to send her pictures of her child when I get a cute one. We talk or call each other.

I think I would just love for one of them to say "Well it wasn't in your contract." I wouldn't take people or keep people long who had that attitude anyway. I can't recall anyone ever saying that to me about anything.

I just refuse to sweat the small stuff. It usually is only one who has that problem. I just address whatever it is with them. No need to give everyone else a 20 page handbook that they're not going to read anyway with every possible thing that could ever go wrong ever.

Just my two cents.

Laurel

Edited to add: I guess I should add that I don't require a two week notice for them to leave (although I request as much notice as possible) and no money is involved. They can leave anytime they want and I can terminate any time I want. So maybe that is why I don't feel the need to defend my contract. They can either follow the rules or leave. I also don't make a million rules because then they'd want to leave and I don't want that. It is just a common sense thing to me. I make a few simple but important rules and if they can't follow them then bye bye. No one has ever left because they were upset and I've never had to term anyone. (Should have once or twice but didn't)


I am actually trying to move in that direction. I don't want a 20 page handbook/contract to cover every single scenario, because something always comes up with ONE parent and no matter what there's always a "loophole"
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Old 09-14-2013, 11:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovemylife View Post
I keep a notebook of everything I need to add to my updated contract. I was under the impression you could only update your contract when the contract is up for renewal. Depending on the provider, at the beginning of the year or after the family has been in your daycare for 1 year. Am I wrong???? If I am wrong that would be great because I have 9 months of issues to add to my policies/contract.
You don't update the CONTRACT unless hours, rates, days change.

The POLICIES and HANDBOOK are completely different and can be updated whenever they need to
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Old 09-14-2013, 12:58 PM
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Originally Posted by cheerfuldom View Post
I am getting more towards how you run things. I will straight out say anything that needs to be said to a parent and preferably in a way that makes them NOT want to make that same mistake again. This is regarding "small stuff" like inappropriate clothing and what not. I do not have the time or resources to waste in printing out lengthy contracts and parent handbooks. That said, I have no problem addressing directly to the parents but a lot of providers, especially new ones, gain a lot of confidence in writing it all out and using that as a resource when they feel they might cave to a demanding or aggressive parent. I certainly would never cave but this is 6 years in the making. and I also dont have a large group. I can see how a thorough contract would be more than helpful the larger the group you have.


I have been doing this for 18 years plus. I have found what works for me and what doesn't.

Laurel
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Old 09-14-2013, 01:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Laurel View Post
You can change it as much as you need to.

That said, I am not that concerned about my contract. It is very basic and is only two pages. I only recall changing it if my fees go up (that is a separate fee schedule though) and also changed it once to add a 'hurricane prep day'. I had people wanting to bring their children to me so they could prepare their homes and I was stuck trying to do mine with their children here. Luckily my adult daughter and son came over to help. Their jobs let them off early....

I may have made 2 or 3 changes over 18 years or so.

My reasoning is that for things that should be common sense, like someone said not wearing flip flops on a hike, I just tell the parent. I don't know why all that little stuff has to be written down. If a parent were to ever tell me (which they never have that I recall) "Well not wearing flip flops on a hike is not in your contract" first I'd look at them like they had two heads and second I'd say "Why would I need to put it in there? Wouldn't it be obvious?" Then I'd let them squirm to come up with an answer and bring me the shoes. I also have spare clothes/shoes just in case. No use ruining our day because someone refused to bring the right clothing. I just don't sweat it.

That said, I have had parents from time to time who forgot things like the shoes. I reminded them a lot and I usually did get them on time. If I knew they were doing it on purpose then I'd just say keep them home because they don't have what they need to participate after being reminded repeatedly. I also tell them in person and put a note in their bag. No emails or texts. I have never done emails/texts except for one this year to send her pictures of her child when I get a cute one. We talk or call each other.

I think I would just love for one of them to say "Well it wasn't in your contract." I wouldn't take people or keep people long who had that attitude anyway. I can't recall anyone ever saying that to me about anything.

I just refuse to sweat the small stuff. It usually is only one who has that problem. I just address whatever it is with them. No need to give everyone else a 20 page handbook that they're not going to read anyway with every possible thing that could ever go wrong ever.

Just my two cents.

Laurel

Edited to add: I guess I should add that I don't require a two week notice for them to leave (although I request as much notice as possible) and no money is involved. They can leave anytime they want and I can terminate any time I want. So maybe that is why I don't feel the need to defend my contract. They can either follow the rules or leave. I also don't make a million rules because then they'd want to leave and I don't want that. It is just a common sense thing to me. I make a few simple but important rules and if they can't follow them then bye bye. No one has ever left because they were upset and I've never had to term anyone. (Should have once or twice but didn't)
I do policies because I feel like if I put the things that are important to me on paper it helps the parent (and while we go over them me too) figure if we are a good fit. I used to have basics but anything that comes up with more than one family or seems like a shocker to the family and I can see becoming and issue again in the future- with another family- I put in my policies. I def used it as my back bone in the earlier years- now not as much BUT it does help shut certain people up when I say: well it was in the policies you agreed to!
I also do a two week notice strictly for budgeting...
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Old 09-14-2013, 02:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Cradle2crayons View Post
You don't update the CONTRACT unless hours, rates, days change.

The POLICIES and HANDBOOK are completely different and can be updated whenever they need to
Got it!! Thanks!! Figured out what I will be doing tomorrow!
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Old 09-14-2013, 03:47 PM
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Originally Posted by cheerfuldom View Post
I am getting more towards how you run things. I will straight out say anything that needs to be said to a parent and preferably in a way that makes them NOT want to make that same mistake again. This is regarding "small stuff" like inappropriate clothing and what not. I do not have the time or resources to waste in printing out lengthy contracts and parent handbooks. That said, I have no problem addressing directly to the parents but a lot of providers, especially new ones, gain a lot of confidence in writing it all out and using that as a resource when they feel they might cave to a demanding or aggressive parent. I certainly would never cave but this is 6 years in the making. and I also dont have a large group. I can see how a thorough contract would be more than helpful the larger the group you have.
Same here. I don't have a contract. They can leave whenever they want and I can ask them to leave anytime I want. I address things that need correcting with the offender straight up. I do have an info sheet that I give them that has basic info on it like rates, hours, late payment info etc. That's it, it's 1 page.

having said that, it's your business, you make the rules and do what's best for you.
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Old 09-14-2013, 03:52 PM
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Got it!! Thanks!! Figured out what I will be doing tomorrow!
.
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  #21  
Old 09-14-2013, 04:03 PM
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I have been doing this for 18 years plus.
that's a long time, I wonder if I will last that long
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Old 09-14-2013, 04:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Cradle2crayons View Post
You don't update the CONTRACT unless hours, rates, days change.

The POLICIES and HANDBOOK are completely different and can be updated whenever they need to

Yes, that is true. My contract stays the same, but my handbook gets the additions. I have only updated my contract once in 4 years, I have updated my handbook probably 5-6 times each year! My contract is 1.25 pages long. My handbook is 12 pages!
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Old 09-14-2013, 04:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Laurel View Post

My reasoning is that for things that should be common sense, like someone said not wearing flip flops on a hike, I just tell the parent. I don't know why all that little stuff has to be written down. If a parent were to ever tell me (which they never have that I recall) "Well not wearing flip flops on a hike is not in your contract" first I'd look at them like they had two heads and second I'd say "Why would I need to put it in there? Wouldn't it be obvious?" Then I'd let them squirm to come up with an answer and bring me the shoes. I also have spare clothes/shoes just in case. No use ruining our day because someone refused to bring the right clothing. I just don't sweat it.
I wish that worked for me! This particular incident I told the parent that flip flops weren't appropriate for field trip days and their child needed tennis shoes. She said "oh, it's okay with me. he will be fine!" The next field trip day she brought him in flip flops and a stick jammed into the side of his foot. I gave her the accident report and told her again that flip flops were not appropriate for field trips. She said "oh accidents happen, it's fine." Then I wrote the policy update REQUIRING closed shoes on field trip days. She brought in a pair on tennis shoes for us to keep here to use as we saw fit. Why she couldn't do that in the first place is beyond me!
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Old 09-14-2013, 05:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Familycare71 View Post
I do policies because I feel like if I put the things that are important to me on paper it helps the parent (and while we go over them me too) figure if we are a good fit. I used to have basics but anything that comes up with more than one family or seems like a shocker to the family and I can see becoming and issue again in the future- with another family- I put in my policies. I def used it as my back bone in the earlier years- now not as much BUT it does help shut certain people up when I say: well it was in the policies you agreed to!
I also do a two week notice strictly for budgeting...
Oh I do have a contract but the important things to me can be summed up in two pages and they sign it. I don't have a handbook.

Laurel
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Old 09-14-2013, 05:25 PM
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I wish that worked for me! This particular incident I told the parent that flip flops weren't appropriate for field trip days and their child needed tennis shoes. She said "oh, it's okay with me. he will be fine!" The next field trip day she brought him in flip flops and a stick jammed into the side of his foot. I gave her the accident report and told her again that flip flops were not appropriate for field trips. She said "oh accidents happen, it's fine." Then I wrote the policy update REQUIRING closed shoes on field trip days. She brought in a pair on tennis shoes for us to keep here to use as we saw fit. Why she couldn't do that in the first place is beyond me!
Oh I have told people to bring things to keep here. That happened with a jacket with one parent so they just bought one to keep at my house.

I think when she said it would be fine I would have said "Well it isn't going to work for me. I think I have some shoes that will fit him but they are girls shoes. I guess they are better than nothing though." I do have some shoes but even if I didn't have his size I'd say that so maybe they would bring in shoes. I have sent a boy home in pink shorts once because that is all I had (hot pink). You better believe they sent me spare clothes the next day.

Laurel
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  #26  
Old 09-14-2013, 06:00 PM
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I think it's great if providers can operate without a handbook.

If every relationship and/or client we served in this business actually did use common sense, we wouldn't have half the issues we read about daily on the forum. Unfortunately, common sense is not so common anymore.

I'd be MORE than happy to run my business without a handbook but my regulations require me to provide an explanation of specific practices, such as how I will manage diaper/bathroom procedures, discipline, guidance, curriculum, nap and rest times as well as meals, payments and closed/absent days etc.

I also think parents appreciate the outline of services I am providing to them. Just as there are providers who have trouble speaking up, there are parents who also don't know how or what to ask a provider, especially first time parents.

Not to mention that I usually have 10-12 kids and I'd rather not go over all of those details so many times to each adult in charge of the child. That's a lot of talking. Instead I use my handbook to outline the basics and leave the questions that arise for each individual family to ask me individually.
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Old 10-09-2013, 09:47 PM
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You can't make rules to fit kids imaginations. And in the same way, you can never assume parents will have common sense, never ever. When I worked mainstream pre-K, public facility I had to keep adding rules to the kids. You just know that imaginative things would come up... and the older snappier kids would usually end up saying, "it's not against the rules!" to which I would rely "I shouldn't have to make a rule about XYZ" LOL. The craziest was cutting another person's hair. I finally made a rule "keep your scissors and all art supplies to yourself".

In the same way, parents aren't sensical most of the time. I think they are, then they pull some boneheaded stunt like sending a kid with no diaper, and just pants... or sending a kid in shorts when there is snow on the ground.
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Old 10-10-2013, 05:49 AM
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Mister Sir Husband Mister Sir Husband is offline
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Originally Posted by Nebula View Post
You can't make rules to fit kids imaginations. And in the same way, you can never assume parents will have common sense, never ever. When I worked mainstream pre-K, public facility I had to keep adding rules to the kids. You just know that imaginative things would come up... and the older snappier kids would usually end up saying, "it's not against the rules!" to which I would rely "I shouldn't have to make a rule about XYZ" LOL. The craziest was cutting another person's hair. I finally made a rule "keep your scissors and all art supplies to yourself".

In the same way, parents aren't sensical most of the time. I think they are, then they pull some boneheaded stunt like sending a kid with no diaper, and just pants... or sending a kid in shorts when there is snow on the ground.
Very well put... I think the contract should be updated as often as needed to keep up with the things that happen that make you scratch your head in amazement and think "oh my gosh, I can't believe that just happened". I would be willing to bet that the first hair dryer ever made didn't have a big tag hanging off the cord telling consumers not to use it in the shower... but then some idiot did it and there ya go.. instant policy update.
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Old 10-10-2013, 05:57 AM
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Very well put... I think the contract should be updated as often as needed to keep up with the things that happen that make you scratch your head in amazement and think "oh my gosh, I can't believe that just happened". I would be willing to bet that the first hair dryer ever made didn't have a big tag hanging off the cord telling consumers not to use it in the shower... but then some idiot did it and there ya go.. instant policy update.
LOL so true! I have learned after years of trial and error, you just can't assume anything. Common sense is highly lacking in our society and parents are no exception. Some just do not need to be able to procreate. All of my current parents are amazing... knock on wood.
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Old 10-11-2013, 04:44 PM
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I wish that worked for me! This particular incident I told the parent that flip flops weren't appropriate for field trip days and their child needed tennis shoes. She said "oh, it's okay with me. he will be fine!" The next field trip day she brought him in flip flops and a stick jammed into the side of his foot. I gave her the accident report and told her again that flip flops were not appropriate for field trips. She said "oh accidents happen, it's fine." Then I wrote the policy update REQUIRING closed shoes on field trip days. She brought in a pair on tennis shoes for us to keep here to use as we saw fit. Why she couldn't do that in the first place is beyond me!
this same thing happened to me. I had a parent bring a child with shoes that were way to big for him. I told her he needed shoes to go outside in and she said its ok to not wear shoes. sure enough he got hurt that day because of the stupid shoes
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Old 10-11-2013, 04:52 PM
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this same thing happened to me. I had a parent bring a child with shoes that were way to big for him. I told her he needed shoes to go outside in and she said its ok to not wear shoes. sure enough he got hurt that day because of the stupid shoes
Same here! I had a parent who decided their child didn't need to wear inside shoes (crocs, that we provide) on our laminate floor because he didn't want to. Sure enough, that same morning he decided to show off to everyone else wearing crocs that he could twirl around really fast in his socks- he slipped, fell, landed straight on his face on his glasses and cut his eyebrow so deep he needed stitches!

Another parent a few years later decided her child was find in flip flops to go hiking in. Child gets a stick stuck in the side of his foot enough that it bleeds. She STILL doesn't want to send him in closed shoes, saying accidents happen. Great family otherwise so I just bought some tennis shoes for him to keep here...
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