Daycare.com Forum

Go Back   Daycare.com Forum > Parents and Guardians Forum

Parents and Guardians Forum Parents and Guardians should post and answer questions here.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-04-2009, 09:35 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Not Allowed to Breastfeed at Daycare

I have a scenario in which the in-home provider is refusing to allow a parent to come in and breastfeed her child at the home. This person has been planning for 6 months to bring the newborn to this daycare and the week prior to the newborn starting daycare, when the mother mentioned coming in and nursing the child at noon, the provider told her that it would be too disruptive to the other children who go down for a nap around noon. The mother offered to nurse out on the patio or in her car, but the provider wouldn't compromise. My first question is whether or not it is legal to deny a parent access to their baby and allow them to breastfeed?

Secondly, when the mother called the daycare provider to discuss the situation she told the provider that she was hoping to be able to work out a suitable arrangement or else she would have to take the baby, along with their other child, to another daycare where her efforts to breastfeed would be supported. Again, the provider was not willing to compromise and said "fine" that they should find a new daycare. The family went to pick up the remainder of their belongings and the provider had set them all out on the front porch. The provider had already been paid for the month and refused to refund the money. Though the provider does have a 2 week notice policy, in this case she refused to honor the parent's right to enter the daycare and nurse so the parent's had few other options than to pull the children. What are other provider's thoughts on this?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-06-2009, 05:11 PM
Ms.Sue Ms.Sue is offline
Center Owner
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: State Line Pennsylvania
Posts: 38
Default makes daycare look bad

That is extremely unprofessional. If you have a business- especially dealing with infants --- you need to make your business accessible for parents........Better off leaving.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-13-2009, 05:21 AM
seashell's Avatar
seashell seashell is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 179
Default

I think mom did the right thing leaving. Parents should have access to their child at all times. The provider is clearly hiding something by telling mom she can't come to feed the baby. I think she deserves her money back and that maybe a letter from an attorney could aide in that. I would also call licensing and see what their take is on the subject.

Please keep this updated . . . I would like to know the outcome.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-17-2009, 12:38 PM
Becky
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Red flags!

First, claps all around to the mom taking her child elsewhere!!!!! Red flags are a wonderful instinct. We should all use them. The flag was when the provider first said no. I wouldn't have tried to work anything out with her. I would have grabbed the kids and ran. What is she hiding that she is not ok with this process? I would love for moms to breastfeed my kids in my daycare. Children need that bonding time with their mother any way they can get it!!! Yea that mom has the ability to get off work and come spend time with her child! GO MOMMY! I would have been very alarmed if someone told me I can't come hang out at daycare with my child if I wanted to no matter the reason.

Second, on the refund...it will depend on the contract. If the contract talks about no refunds if you change your mind or you must pay the remainder of the month if you choose to leave, then there is nothing you can do. HOWEVER, the mom tried to work a compromise with the provider and the provider said GO! so I think you have a strong chance of getting the money back but instead of fighting with the lady, just go to claims court and let the judge decide. Write three letters asking for the money and why you think you should get it back. Quote the contract if needed. Then after the third time, file the claim and take all your letters to court and any other evidence. Do not call the lady!!! If you don't believe in suing, then let it go and move on. You can use the media instead of suing as well. We have Aiken's Army at a local station in Houston that helps people with problems. THey would love to help with something like this. Just some ideas.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-18-2009, 05:59 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I, on the other hand, can see why the provider wouldn't want this. Was the mother going to continue this for a month, 6 months, a year??? It is hard enough to get an infant on a schedule, never mind, having to wait for a parent to come feed that infant everyday. What happens when the mother is late, and the baby is screaming. Yes, it does effect the entire daycare. If the mom wants to breastfeed, than pump and send with baby. Also, this would cause another huge adjustment to the baby, when the mom stops doing this. And the provider would have to re-train the child all over again. I am all for breastfeeding, however, from my experience, the breastfed babies are usually the hardest to get onto a schedule. The quicker they get scheduled, the happier the baby is. If the mom wants to breastfeed so desparately, then maybe she should re-consider her priorities and stay home with baby.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-18-2009, 08:49 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

This should have been discussed long before and not after the child started coming to dc. While I would have to agree with the provider here. It is a total disruption to the day when parents come in. Yes, I have an open door policy, does not mean that I want a parent in my work environment everyday.

Parents tend to forget that "this is our job". And just as "your job" would not allow someone to come in and sit for 30 to 45 minutes everyday, I don't want that either at my job.

There are ways to get around this. The mom could pump and bring the milk for the infant each day, or freeze it. I have had many a parent do this.

Please don't continue to say that this provider raises red flags because she said no to this arrangement, I totally understand how this disruption each day can turn quickly into a bad issue. If a mom forgets her things to pump at work, yes, please stop by and feed your baby, but along with this provider, I would not agree to it on a daily basis. Way too disruptive of my day and childcare business. Yes, we are a business just like your employer is.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-18-2009, 09:32 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Parents need to remember we are a busines and we have rules (whether our own or the states), and parents need to abide by them. I can only imagine the disruption when this mom shows up each day and I too would want no part of it.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-19-2009, 07:46 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I also agree that i would not want a parent coming every day to breastfeed their baby. this is when the other kids are napping and ALL kids nap at the same time. Also this is my quiet time, and when i get my housework done. i dont want someone in my house disrupting my routine. i do have an open door policy but this is not something that happens every day.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-19-2009, 10:38 PM
lilbiddapopcorn's Avatar
lilbiddapopcorn lilbiddapopcorn is offline
lilbiddapopcorn
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Northern Cali
Posts: 75
Default But wait...

I understand not wanting the disruption but hang on...cuz mom tried to compromise here. She's not disrupting anything if she's on the patio or in her car, out of sight of the other children. And the fact that she's trying to juggle work and her baby, I think her using her break to breastfeed is a great way to get that bonding time in with her little one. If this situation were presented to me, I think a compromise would've worked fine. She should be able to come breastfeed her baby, as long as she understood she had to quietly come pick the baby up, and she'd have to do it on the patio or in her car. And as far as the baby's schedule changing, it would've happened eventually anyway. Baby's schedules change. They stay up longer. Sometimes moms schedule will change and her feeding habits will change. You can't assume very day will be the exact same for this baby if you expect him/her to stay for any length of time.
__________________
Ches
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-20-2009, 07:02 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

exactly, the baby's schedule may change everyday. So does that mean the provider has to hold off the baby's feeding until mom gets there? I'm sorry, but when babys are hungry, they want it NOW. I agree that it would be extremely disruptive to the providers schedule. And I also agree, that I would not want a parent coming into my house every afternoon. When I get my kids down for nap...I fold laundry, I clean the house, I get dinner started, etc. and I wouldn't want someone there while I am trying to do these things. Also, the provider would have to be standing there at the ready for when the mom finishes, instead of going about their normal routine to keep the household and the business in order. At home providers are also moms too, and they need to get their things done too and most days, during naptime is the only time we have. I also don't like anyone interrupting my kids naptime....it is the only break I get in a twelve hour day.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 05-21-2009, 05:13 PM
sweetcinna sweetcinna is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Indiana
Posts: 43
Default

Now i do leave to option open for the mother, however the baby has to be "bottle broke" and I only allow a 15 min window, If she doesn't make it within 15 min then the baby will be fed with a bottle. What parents don't seem to realize that it is very disruptive when anyone walks through the door. I also do not allow pick up or drop off during nap. I do have a open door policy, however that doesn't mean i want a parent comming over to my house just to visit while I'm working, and i do all my new client interviews after hours. You just can't be to careful now days.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-01-2009, 10:31 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Thumbs down saddend

This is about BREASTFEEDING , not just walking in to "hang out" As a firm believer in breastfeeding , this is the best thing any mother could give. YOu should nkwo you can't expect a baby to be on a strict feeding schedule. I do know babies can be put on feeding schedules, but a nursing baby is already going to be on a less strict schedule to begin with. Whats more important a schedule,or the baby getting the best thing ? I came on this site because I have been thinknig about becoming a child care provider.
As a former nursing mother, I had both a horrible experience, as well as a wonderful experince nursing in daycares. I had my older child in a daycare's after school program. He was in 1st grade. My baby was in a home daycare. After picking up my baby I would sit and nurse him for maybe 5minutes,not more than 10 ,while i waited for my older son to get his stuff and say goodbye to his friends,etc... Another parent complained (I was covered by the way) because they felt their child shouldn't be exposed to seeing a baby being breastfed and they disdn't want their child knowing about it until 'the right time" This is what I was todl by the owner of this daycare center. I was angry because this is not sex,it is a fact of life something god gave us to use to nurish our baby. If i were sitting down at the MALL or anywhere ELSE, and this parent had her child ,well I guess her child would stil l have been exposed to it.
They demanded I use their restroom or not do it at all and threatend to kick my older son out if I didn't comply. My state law says I had a right to breatsfeed where ever I and my baby was legally allowed(so this applied). I didn't have the guts to get a lawyer and sue their butts off ,so when I refused and told them politely about my rights and no thank you I will NOT use a dirty bathroom,the chair in the after school room was worknig jsut fine,thank you... they refused to take my older child. So I didn't pay them for that week.

The home daycare I had my baby (younger son) in allowed for me to nurse hgim for those 10minutes(it was a great stress reliever for my baby) before leaving for home. it not only helped him relieve stress,but I was pretty engorged by then because my job didn't allow much time for pumping,and although I got my body used to producing milk only when he nursed,they still got full by that time of the day. She stil lencourages breastfeeding.She nursed her own baby in front of her own daycare kids. I now work for her myself(which has inspired me to want my own daycare) and she will take fully pumped milk in bottles AND?OR let the mothers nurse as well. I think it's awsome she fully supports it and whenever I take children in my own home I wilL support it 100%.
As a nursing mom, know your rights, ecause if this daycare provider is violating your rights I suggest you get her in trouble. Don't let her get away with it,like i did with that other center. I agree, find someone else. She seems to care more about herself then the welfare of a child. Children need their mommys milk daycare or not. how sad for people to be like that,all because of whatever personal hang ups they have about breastfeeding. oh by the way, the reason why I didn't just nurse him in the home daycare first, before getting my older son from the other one was because the home daycare closed before the other one did. I did not want to impose on her. Whenever I got off earlier, however, I did nurse him there, because I was more comfortable there. I couldn't use her for after school care,because she was not in the same schol district,and had no way of getting him from his school. So unfortunatley I had to use different providers. That happend too,when I had my 3rd baby. My odlest was in school, my middle one was still with her,but when I had my 3rd she had no openings for infants,and I had to find alternate care. Funny thing is I was never satisfied with anyt center,and if I ever have a 4th (which I don't plan to) he/she wil lgo to her and I will find a way. Even if I plan months in advance to save a spot.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-12-2009, 05:02 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
exactly, the baby's schedule may change everyday. So does that mean the provider has to hold off the baby's feeding until mom gets there? I'm sorry, but when babys are hungry, they want it NOW. I agree that it would be extremely disruptive to the providers schedule. And I also agree, that I would not want a parent coming into my house every afternoon. When I get my kids down for nap...I fold laundry, I clean the house, I get dinner started, etc. and I wouldn't want someone there while I am trying to do these things. Also, the provider would have to be standing there at the ready for when the mom finishes, instead of going about their normal routine to keep the household and the business in order. At home providers are also moms too, and they need to get their things done too and most days, during naptime is the only time we have. I also don't like anyone interrupting my kids naptime....it is the only break I get in a twelve hour day.
Wow...I wish my employer paid me to clean my house, cook my dinner, and fold my laundry while I was on his dime.

News flash, you're an in house daycare provider that chooses to do everything yourself to maximize profits. You do not get your two 15 minute breaks if the needs of the children do not allow it. The mother thinks its best for the baby to come in and feed at noon and offers to do it OUTSIDE of the house? She's paying you to care for the child when she is unavailable. Who are you to say what a mother can and can't do with her own child....especially when she's paying you.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-12-2009, 06:56 PM
mac60's Avatar
mac60 mac60 is offline
Advanced Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Northeast
Posts: 1,580
Default

Wow, nobody is saying the mother doesn't have the right to breastfeed. Why not pump and give thru bottle. Same milk. As far as breastfeeding at the daycare center, I don't blame them for asking you to do it somewhere beside in front of the children, doing it in a daycare in front of the kids is NOT the place to being breastfeeding.....and yes, we all know it is a natural thing, but there IS a place for it, and I don't think it is a daycare.

To unregistered and your NEWS FLASH:

Do you have any idea how much laundry I do that is DAYCARE related each day? Probably not. From towels, washcloths, sheets, blankets, that are used each day, to the cleaning up of the kitchen from 2 meals and 2 snacks, to cleaning up activities, to planning activities, to cleaning the bathroom because the toilet was peed on or the floor, to mopping the kitchen because your child threw they food on the floor, and the list goes on and on. If I am lucky, I can eat lunch by 1:30 pm.

And parents need to remember that the provider is the MANAGER/OWNER/BOSS of her daycare businsess, not the parent, and if the parent doesn't like the way the provider operates her business, maybe they should look elsewhere for care.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-13-2009, 05:17 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

For what it is worth, I would certainly "allow" a mother to breast feed in my home as long as it didn't disrupt the daily routine I have with the children. I have a schedule and routine in place so things run smoothly and so the children in my care know what will be happening next, they know what to expect and what is expected of them. If there was a mother who breast fed, she would be part of the routine. Baby X's mommy comes in and takes him to the other room at whatever time, and that's just what happens everyday. If it started to be disruptive then changes would have to be made. I have yet to do infant care so this is all hypothetical and quite honestly I don't know how it would actually work out (I breast fed my daughter for 14 months and the only person she ever took a bottle from was me, and that was once, so completely useless and we just didn't spend too much time apart, I was lucky that way)

News flash lady. If any of my parents had the same attitude that you do and felt the need to tell me about it, I would tell them to take their $2.50 an hour (not including after hour and weekend duties that must be attended to) and go find some other sucker to take care of their kid. It actually makes me a little sick to my stomach to know that there are people out there that feel that way. Go see what you can get someone off the street to do for you for that much money an hour. We choose to do this job, but we are not indentured servants that need to bow down to the sanctimonious attitudes of parents like newsflash.

Okay, I feel better now.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06-13-2009, 06:42 AM
Former Teacher's Avatar
Former Teacher Former Teacher is offline
Advanced Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 1,119
Default I have said this a million times.....

why is it the posters with the sassiest mouths are the ones that are unregistered? I think we should go to where everyone has to be registered. What about it Michael?

Anyway about breastfeeding. I agree that while breastfeeding is a beautiful thing, I don't agree with it being done at daycare in front of the children. It seems like this parent was trying to be accommodating and the provider didn't want to be.

On the flip side, at my former center, we had a father EVERYDAY spend his lunchtime with his baby. Of course he didn't feed her. He just wanted to hold her. We had to make sure she was either well rested or force her to stay up until after he left because he would come in and purposely wake her up. Funny thing is, he wouldn't play much with her. He just held her. He mainly talked with the staff. Disrupting? VERY since many times the other classrooms would hear him talk, laugh, just be loud. However we could not tell him he couldn't come in at nap time because TX law states that a parent has access to their child at ALL times. I suppose we could have told him to hold his child out on the porch. However, I would think that sounds kinda unprofessional considering he does have access to his child which also means his provider.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 06-14-2009, 10:07 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
For what it is worth, I would certainly "allow" a mother to breast feed in my home as long as it didn't disrupt the daily routine I have with the children. I have a schedule and routine in place so things run smoothly and so the children in my care know what will be happening next, they know what to expect and what is expected of them. If there was a mother who breast fed, she would be part of the routine. Baby X's mommy comes in and takes him to the other room at whatever time, and that's just what happens everyday. If it started to be disruptive then changes would have to be made. I have yet to do infant care so this is all hypothetical and quite honestly I don't know how it would actually work out (I breast fed my daughter for 14 months and the only person she ever took a bottle from was me, and that was once, so completely useless and we just didn't spend too much time apart, I was lucky that way)

News flash lady. If any of my parents had the same attitude that you do and felt the need to tell me about it, I would tell them to take their $2.50 an hour (not including after hour and weekend duties that must be attended to) and go find some other sucker to take care of their kid. It actually makes me a little sick to my stomach to know that there are people out there that feel that way. Go see what you can get someone off the street to do for you for that much money an hour. We choose to do this job, but we are not indentured servants that need to bow down to the sanctimonious attitudes of parents like newsflash.

Okay, I feel better now.
If I was paying $2.50 an hour I wouldn't have any attitude. We are paying $7.50 an hour, as thats the going rate for a center in our area (in home starts at $10/hr). We registered for the waiting list at this center a month before we even got pregnant, and the spot didn't open until my baby was seven months old. I am in a very different environment than most of you in regards to daycare services. The current wait list at our daycare has 10+ kids on it all the time, and as a result, the employees do not care about me or my child anymore than they have to by law. I apologize if I offended anyone with my previous comment. I admit to being heated over reading some of the responses from providers about this topic. My point was only that, when a family pays $1500/mo for daycare for a single child, I do not feel that its too much to ask for my own child to be breastfed on the patio everyday at a time thats convenient for me.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 06-14-2009, 08:05 PM
Chickenhauler's Avatar
Chickenhauler Chickenhauler is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: MN
Posts: 434
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Wow...I wish my employer paid me to clean my house, cook my dinner, and fold my laundry while I was on his dime.

News flash, you're an in house daycare provider that chooses to do everything yourself to maximize profits. You do not get your two 15 minute breaks if the needs of the children do not allow it. The mother thinks its best for the baby to come in and feed at noon and offers to do it OUTSIDE of the house? She's paying you to care for the child when she is unavailable. Who are you to say what a mother can and can't do with her own child....especially when she's paying you.
Here's the kicker-don't like the rules? LEAVE. Go elsewhere.

Who are you to demand that a private business owner make special arrangements to meet your choices? It's a free society, the business owner makes the rules, and if the customer does not like those rules, they are free to take their business elsewhere.

Pssst-for the BS, rigamarole, expense, risk, hard work, and headaches of operating a legal, complaint, safe daycare in one's home, the income sucks.

For us, it isn't about the money, it's about the wife being able to stay home with our kids, as I think you will find that most in home daycare providers agree. If they didn't have kids at home, most of them wouldn't open their homes like they do. If you don't believe so, go in search of an in-home daycare where the family has no kids of their own.

That dinner the provider is cooking? Some of it's going to feed your kid.
That cleaning the provider is doing? Yeah, your kid was part of the mess.
That laundry? You guessed it, your kid benefits from having clean towels, linens and blankets on hand.
__________________
Spouse of a daycare provider....which I guess makes me one too!
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 06-15-2009, 12:25 PM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Red face

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
If I was paying $2.50 an hour I wouldn't have any attitude. We are paying $7.50 an hour, as thats the going rate for a center in our area (in home starts at $10/hr). We registered for the waiting list at this center a month before we even got pregnant, and the spot didn't open until my baby was seven months old. I am in a very different environment than most of you in regards to daycare services. The current wait list at our daycare has 10+ kids on it all the time, and as a result, the employees do not care about me or my child anymore than they have to by law. I apologize if I offended anyone with my previous comment. I admit to being heated over reading some of the responses from providers about this topic. My point was only that, when a family pays $1500/mo for daycare for a single child, I do not feel that its too much to ask for my own child to be breastfed on the patio everyday at a time thats convenient for me.
$1500/mo is what I would get for 3 full time children, before food/supply costs. It sounds like most of the providers on the board live in areas where that sort of price range for one child is not even on the radar. If we take state pays so we don't get paid until way after the service is provided, sometimes have to chase parents down for their co-pays, and it just basically ends up being an out of pocket expense for us and hopefully we'll get it paid back.
I was offended by your comments because the other providers I know DO NOT do it for the money, we would have to be raving lunatics if we did. We try and do what is best for the children in our care and that includes loving them. The thought of a parent trying to tell us to suck it up and do what they tell us to do, whether we like it or not, in our own homes is going to raise some hackles.
Part of the reason I don't work in a center anymore is because trying to wrangle 12-15 children by myself didn't leave a lot of room for being a caring, loving person. Nope, just an angry, stressed out control freak who wasn't doing anyone any good.
Sooo, in my own home I do it how I want to do it with only 5 children, while my own darling daughter is at school. I love seeing the results of the work I do but I put a lot of work and money into it.
I think a lot of the other providers here would echo with similar comments. Please keep that in mind when you post. We seem to be a sensitive bunch.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 07-14-2009, 04:27 PM
SimpleMom's Avatar
SimpleMom SimpleMom is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 590
Default

I agree it was completely unprofessional and should be illegal to not allow a mother to breast feed their child. It's different than pumping that milk into a bottle. The baby loves the nuture of a mother's touch and moms as well. It's such a very close relationship when there is breastfeeding going on and essential to keep that up if at all possible.

I believe it should be a mother's right as a stay at home mom or a working mom to breast feed her child. It saddens me to hear so much controversy on the issue.

I am a provider and a mother and I did breastfeed one child and bottlefed the other. There's a difference. Staying at home is not always a choice. Breastfeeding is one of the most nutritious and comforting things for a baby and a baby and mother should never be denied the opportunity.

The daycare routine will need to adjust and become a new routine is all.
Just my two cents...
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 07-15-2009, 08:12 AM
ConcernedMotherof2's Avatar
ConcernedMotherof2 ConcernedMotherof2 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 88
Default (sigh)...

Running an in-home daycare is HARD. Depending on the area you live in and the licensing standards, a home may have to be kept IMPOSSIBLY clean and open to inspection at ANY time. Having been a stay at home mom with two babies in diapers, I know how hard it was to maintain a routine and a clean home and I can't imagine what it would have been like to add more children to the scenario. When my kids were infants and in an in-home daycare, it was a very personal experience and the provider and I worked together a lot... yes, I was very lucky to have found such a great provider at the time.

Every child is different, so the mere addition of a child to a daycare is going to disrupt the routine a little each time. Infants' schedules change daily, as was stated before, and this is something that has to be dealt with. I think the issue has more to do with differing opinions on the parent/provider's part. The parent here was right in seeking other care. As to the money lost, well, I've lost hundreds (literally) of dollars for similar circumstances, having to pull my kids from one daycare or another for various reasons. It happens, unfortunately, and I'm not one to sue. That's personal choice.

As far as breastfeeding, I applaud the mother in trying to maintain this with her child even though she has to return to work. I nursed my youngest for 18 months (yes, in front of my older child) and did everything from going to daycare on my lunches/breaks to pumping all day and providing milk (along with a haberman feeder, as opposed to a bottle because she wouldn't take a bottle). As with any issue involving leaving an infant in daycare, this requires work and communication on the part of both parent and provider. It sounds like this particular parent was willing to do anything she could to accomodate the provider's wishes while doing what she believed was best for her baby. Hopefully she will find the right situation for her baby so that she can continue to be the stellar parent that she is (working full time and still maintaining as much contact as she can with her child).
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 07-16-2009, 04:30 AM
mac60's Avatar
mac60 mac60 is offline
Advanced Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Northeast
Posts: 1,580
Default

After reading, and re-reading these post over and over, I still stand with some others here, that I could not agree to a mom coming in everyday to breastfeed. Sorry, but they are not going to sit on my patio and do it as the kids would stand on the other side of the glass and watch, what happens the first time it rains, too hot, too cold. Not going to sit in my living room or kitchen either, as there is no way for me to keep the other dc kids from hanging at the doorway, and not going to my bedroom, as that is my private space, and not going to sit in my driveway. You say sitting in the driveway is not going to disrupt, you still have to come in and get the baby, bring the baby back in, etc.

I still say there are ways to work this out, for starters pump the milk and bring it in. Then breastfeed in the mornings before coming and in the late afternoons and evenings when home. Funny the providers here are being told they are not willing to work with the mom, yet I don't see the parents willing to work with the provider either, it is kind of like my way or no way from the parents.

And the issue of the money got lost in this thread. I am not so sure that I would of given the money back either. As it was the parents choice to leave. I am sure the provider had "saved" a spot for the newborn for some time, losing money in saving the spot, and after saving this spot, the parents pulled the infant. Not only that, the provider lost the other child. I agree with the provider in not returning the money, as it was 100% the parents choice to leave, as they choose not to make this situation work, and are trying to blame it on the provider. Unfortuanately one of the things of being a working mom is compromise, which in my opinion, it doesn't sound like the mom was willing to do.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 06-20-2016, 08:42 AM
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Legal rights

It states that a mother can breastfeed her baby anywhere she is. This means if she is at the daycare by law she can breastfeed her child. So everyone can have your opinion but the law is in mom's favor not your daycare policy.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 06-20-2016, 09:09 AM
Blackcat31's Avatar
Blackcat31 Blackcat31 is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 5,449
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
It states that a mother can breastfeed her baby anywhere she is. This means if she is at the daycare by law she can breastfeed her child. So everyone can have your opinion but the law is in mom's favor not your daycare policy.
This is an old thread. (2009)

The law does not apply to all private in home family child care facilities.

In some cases, the law does not clearly address private places (such as family daycare) or has an exclusion and/or does not have wording that is applicable to individual situations.

Each state has it's own interpretation of the law.

http://www.ncsl.org/research/health/...tate-laws.aspx
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 06-22-2016, 04:01 PM
Leigh's Avatar
Leigh Leigh is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,559
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
It states that a mother can breastfeed her baby anywhere she is. This means if she is at the daycare by law she can breastfeed her child. So everyone can have your opinion but the law is in mom's favor not your daycare policy.
She can breastfeed anywhere she and the child have a legal right to be. A parent does not have a legal right to show up at my home at naptime and disrupt my kids' day by breastfeeding in my daycare room. A parent DOES have legal access to their child at any time. A parent can take that child and leave. If a provider has a policy about having a child dropped off one time per day, that's perfectly legal. My policy is if a parent shows up, they need to take their child with them and leave. I do not have to let a parent stay on my premises for an extended period of time.

I'm very supportive of a mom's right to breastfeed, but not of a parent hanging around my home in the middle of the day. I do not have an area for parents to BF away from the other children, and having a parent visit makes ALL of the kids act up. Having a parent show up and then leave makes their own child sad/angry/lose their dang mind.

My feeling is that a baby NEEDS to be able to take breastmilk from a BOTTLE at my home. Having a parent show up to BF trains that child to refuse the bottle until mom shows up. When mom tires of driving to daycare to feed, then I am stuck trying to get a BF baby to take a bottle from me.

I understand, as a mother, why someone would want to drop in at daycare to BF. As a provider, I don't allow it for the reasons listed above. And, I don't have to allow it.
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 06-29-2016, 05:33 AM
Second Home's Avatar
Second Home Second Home is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,469
Default

I don't have the regs handy right now .

But in MD we must allow a mother to breastfeed during daycare hours if they want to , we also must provide a place ( with privacy)for this to be done as well as access to running water .

Now if a mom shows up at closing then she does not have the right to stay and breastfeed after daycare hours .
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 06-29-2016, 05:59 AM
Thriftylady's Avatar
Thriftylady Thriftylady is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Ohio
Posts: 5,887
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Second Home View Post
I don't have the regs handy right now .

But in MD we must allow a mother to breastfeed during daycare hours if they want to , we also must provide a place ( with privacy)for this to be done as well as access to running water .

Now if a mom shows up at closing then she does not have the right to stay and breastfeed after daycare hours .
That would keep me from taking infants. I assume there are precious few infant spots due to that.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 06-29-2016, 09:37 AM
Second Home's Avatar
Second Home Second Home is offline
Daycare.com Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 1,469
Default

There are already few spots for infants . I had calls looking for care when the baby isn't even due for 6 months , another looking for care starting in Feb . And I see so many posts about people needing infant care .

I had thought about not accepting infants anymore but then I would have no clients or loose ones I have when a sibling comes along . So until it becomes an issue I will take infants
.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
2009, breastfeeding in daycare, snowflake

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Licensed DayCare vs. Private DayCare marylmr Daycare Center and Family Home Forum 45 09-16-2017 07:50 AM
Daycare Provider, Pre-K-3rd Grade Teacher or Nurse? Unregistered Daycare Center and Family Home Forum 4 09-04-2014 02:21 PM
No Wonder You Can't Find Daycare... blandino Daycare Center and Family Home Forum 6 08-27-2013 02:35 PM
Today Is The Last Day With Daycare Babies...Ever! cheerfuldom Daycare Center and Family Home Forum 20 02-03-2013 12:55 PM
How Do Your Older Kids Feel About Daycare? My4SunshineGirlsNY Daycare Center and Family Home Forum 21 02-24-2011 01:55 PM


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 08:06 PM.



Daycare.com         Find A Daycare         List Your Daycare         Toys & Products                 About Us

Daycare.com
Please read our Disclaimer before continuing.

Topics pertain mainly to the following States:

Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming